Singlespeeds

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by bobbyOCR, Dec 7, 2006.

  1. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Messages:
    1,357
    Likes Received:
    0
    I love my singlespeed road and mtb bikes, but the roadies frame was free, is heavy, with extremely poor geometry sooo.

    Why are there no cheap singlespeeds in existence in Australia. I was looking at Cannondale Capos in the US and they are reasonably prices, as well as Bianchi Pistas. Why is the retail price over here close to double? I am also looking at starting track.
     
    Tags:


  2. sideshow_bob

    sideshow_bob New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Messages:
    506
    Likes Received:
    0
    ... because we in Australia get screwed. It's not the LBS's it's the sole distributor arrangements. Heaven forbid anybody legally uses the parallel import laws to bring stuff in and try to break the monopolies. Then there's threats and intimidation tactics both through the supply chain and to sources of traditional print advertizing etc.

    --brett
     
  3. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,717
    Likes Received:
    2
    You could pick up a cheap second hand track bike like mine, but one that has the holes for the brakes and waterbottle holder and simply put a front brake on it.
     
  4. Bigbananabike

    Bigbananabike Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    15
    ===========================================================
    Same here in Kiwiland. Beats me what someone would do if they wanted a new frame or whole bike for a road ready single speed - basically unavailable no matter how much $ goes over the counter.

    Apart from old timers no one knows the value of fixed gear or single speed training bikes - sadly:eek:

    Paul
     
  5. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Messages:
    1,357
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am far from old and I believe doing short hills on my singlespeed is a key part of my training, for strength and legspeed. The situation doesn't look great. If I try and take one through customs the price increases by a huge amount. :(
     
  6. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    1,615
    Likes Received:
    1
    MB is right, Bobby. The market for SS / Fixies is very small, so 2nd hand is a good option. I ride my old track bike on the road. I picked it up from Fleet down at Fremantle for AUD $500 10 years ago and, when I stopped riding track, I just continued to use it on the road. I rode it for about 3 years on the road before my wife made me stick brakes on it.
    I had it up in Malaysia for 4 years before sending it back to Perth. When I get back down there next week, I'll be pulling it out and getting it back on the road. I still love riding fixed on the road (except for horror hills).
    If you want new, have a look at the Avanti Pista. They aren't too expensive. There are usually a few 2nd hand track bikes floating around, as people tend to drift in and out of track as their circumstances change.
    Rather than just thinking about riding track, get on to Midland Cycle Club and ask them about getting a ride out at the velodrome. They used to have some club bikes out there that you could pay a few bucks to have a ride. Track is either something you love, or hate. Go and give it a go to find out. If you stick with it, you'll learn some skills that translate well to riding road.
     
  7. caferacerwanabe

    caferacerwanabe New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    0
    Apollo/Raceline & Pro-Lite both have two nicely equipped track bikes out of Taiwan for under 1600$ , they are well worth the extra dollars over the Avanti Pista.
    Bearing in mind these bikes last much times longer than their road equivalent 1600$ is peanuts really.
     
  8. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,945
    Likes Received:
    1,036
    i'm not familiar with your country's import taxation scheme, but here there are greatly differing rates between importing a 'new' and a 'used' bicycle.
     
  9. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,717
    Likes Received:
    2
    Anything under AU$1000 you can usually get in tax free. After that theres various compounding costs. Second hand in theory is 5% less, but in reality, it would probably slip under the radar and get in tax free.

    If you are going overseas, then I'd simply bring the bike back as luggage and it should slip under the the radar.
     
  10. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Messages:
    1,357
    Likes Received:
    0
    This may be true, but customs loves hitting big packages with duty fees and whatever else they do. A good friend ordered an orbea orca frame and got hit with I think it was 50% of its value, so he ended up paying $4,500 for a $3000 frame.
     
  11. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    A common kludge (no matter where you are in the world) is to take an OLD 10-speed which has 120mm rear spacing (e.g., Raleigh Record, Grand Prix, etc. ... gotta be under $100AU, used), pull the freewheel & derailleurs, and install a BMX freewheel ($10US-to-$80US+, depending on whether the BMX freewheel is a single-pawl Taiwanese unit or a high-zoot competition freewheel).

    Of course, the well-heeled opt for a flip-flop hub so that they can either run as a fixie with a track cog & a freewheel on the other side OR have two different BMX cog sizes on the same hub.

    The least expensive steel framed "racing" bike from the 70s & 80s can't be more than a pound heavier than the best frames of that era ... the geometry is generally pretty rider-friendly (72ยบ angles are common). So, just start to scour the thrift stores and/or adverts for used 10-speeds + get a BMX freewheel (deciding the number of cogs is probably the hardest part), and you should be good-to-go for a modest amount of money ...
     
  12. Sando

    Sando New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm about to go and test ride (literally this morning) an Allegro at a bike shop in Melbourne.

    I have spoken to a bike mechanic who has one for commuting to and from work each day and he loves his. I'll just have to put a flip/flop hub on the back of it.

    Allegro does not have a website but the company is run by one dude who imports frames from Taiwan and they cost around $800 fully built. And yes the frame has holes for a front and rear break if you require!

    I'll let you know how it goes!
     
  13. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Messages:
    1,357
    Likes Received:
    0
    I went one better already. I took a new steel frame (Which is kinda crap) which was free as a complete bike for the Great WA Bike Ride, Pulled the freewheel and everything unnecessary off it. Redished the wheels. Bought new stem and handlebars for $20. Bought some track cranks off Ebay for $20, BMX freewheel and Izumi track chain for $30, put some parts I had laying around on with a 42t biopace chainring and there you go, cheap singlespeed. If I can find a worthwhile old steel frame I'll get it though, but I want it to be legal for track.
     
  14. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,717
    Likes Received:
    2
    Sounds like a nice bike. You may have to change the free wheel for a fixed one to ride on the track and when you get that replacement frame, get one with a raised bottom bracket.
     
  15. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    1,615
    Likes Received:
    1
    A high BB is an advantage riding fixed on the road. I ride with a set of old Dura-Ace 165mm cranks, which are pissy to ride, but seldom hit. The right side now has 2 cracks in it, so is due to be replaced. I plan on 170mm's or 172.5's - depends what's available cheap. The 165's make it feel like a bloody circus bike.
     
  16. Phill P

    Phill P New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    0
    New upstart here in Australia is allegro http://www.allegrobikes.com.au/bikes/onya/

    The onya looks interesting, not seen one but seen a few of thier other bikes. Website doesn't say much about spec.

    Being that this guy is new and probably desperate for sales, why not try to get a forum buyer group together and approach allegro to see if you could get a group bulk buy deal directly? You just need somebody to organise it and collect money (paypal??)
     
  17. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    What are the qualifications to make a bike legal for track?

    Is it BB height?

    IF SO, what is the minimum requirement?

    Are there any other requirements (presuming BB height is the primary one!)?

    BTW. What are THE Keirin specs, anyway? Do they differ from OTHER track specifications?
     
  18. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    1,615
    Likes Received:
    1
    If it is a UCI-sanctioned event, the BB spindle height must be between 24cm and 30cm.
    Ref. http://www.uci.ch/imgArchive/Rules/1gene-E.pdf
     
  19. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    Thanks. I didn't read ALL the pages ... I found the one which had the same info you noted -- it seems as though almost anything other than Penny-Farthings and recumbents are "okay" with regard to BB height!
     
  20. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Messages:
    1,357
    Likes Received:
    0
    The local 'trackies' also say track stay-ends. (the rear-opening horizontal ones.)
     
Loading...
Loading...