Sitting or Standing

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Peter Rollason, Feb 19, 2003.

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  1. What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?

    When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle

    Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?

    [email protected]
     
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  2. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    >When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle

    >Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    >sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    >encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?

    Many issues and many different individuals. Pantani climbs seated for a while then standing for a
    while, gives those muscles a change. Heart rate may be a tad higher standing.

    Bottomline is you have to discover what works best for you as an an individual.

    jon isaacs
     
  3. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Peter Rollason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?
    >

    Sitting is slightly more cardio-vascular efficient. Standing uses slightly different muscles. Many
    people stand for part of a long climb to change the muscle loading, some climb entirely seated, a
    few entirely standing. I don't think there's a right or wrong way, it's a personal thing.
     
  4. Panda

    Panda Guest

    i remember watching the tour de france in 2001 (i think) and they interviewed jan ulrich about
    armstrong. ulrich (who climbs mainly seated - i think) said that if he tried to climb like armstrong
    (ie out of the saddle) his heart rate went up 10bpm without any increase in speed. so i think the
    answer is its whatever works best for u.

    panda

    "Peter Rollason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?
    >
    > [email protected]
    >
     
  5. Raymo853

    Raymo853 Guest

    Panda is very correct, it is what works for you. I stand allot more than most folks, but just for
    periods. When I stand I usually upshift, slow down my cadence and maintain about the same speed.
    Yes my heart rate goes up but when I sit back down I usually stay in that gear and then
    accelerate a tad.

    "panda" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > i remember watching the tour de france in 2001 (i think) and they interviewed jan ulrich about
    > armstrong. ulrich (who climbs mainly seated -
    i
    > think) said that if he tried to climb like armstrong (ie out of the
    saddle)
    > his heart rate went up 10bpm without any increase in speed. so i think the answer is its whatever
    > works best for u.
    >
    > panda
    >
    >
    > "Peter Rollason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    > >
    > > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    > >
    > > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > > encourage
    downward
    > > power - but would seem to be faster ?
    > >
    > > [email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  6. "Peter Rollason" <peter[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?
    >
    > [email protected]

    Staying in the saddle is the most efficient way to ride.

    However, I don't always do that. When I am climbing for more than about 20 minutes I need to stand
    to stretch my legs and back. I also seem to be able to catch my breath slightly. And I also shift up
    a gear or two while standing, shifting back when I sit back down.

    Tom
     
  7. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Thomas Reynolds) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > Staying in the saddle is the most efficient way to ride.
    >
    > However, I don't always do that. When I am climbing for more than about 20 minutes I need to stand
    > to stretch my legs and back. I also seem to be able to catch my breath slightly. And I also shift
    > up a gear or two while standing, shifting back when I sit back down.

    Sitting for long periods of time when crawling in a low gear also creates pressure on your tail bone
    (and other things rubbing your saddle). Standing helps get your blood flowing again, reducing
    friction and numbness. Mixing sitting and standing will also get you to the top of the hill faster.

    Ken
     
  8. Corey Green

    Corey Green Guest

    I agree with the other posters concerning standing versus seated when climbing - it depends on what
    you personally prefer.

    However, if you try standing and it doesn't work for you the first time, don't immediately abandon
    it. You still have to train to have the ability to stand and withstand the changes in muscle use and
    heartrate. I imagine that Ullrich has never really trained in a standing position while climbing,
    and maybe never even had the need or interest.

    I know the Armstrong trains the ability to climb standing and seated. It doesn't automatically work.

    Corey

    "Peter Rollason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?
    >
    > [email protected]
    >
     
  9. "Peter Rollason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?
    >
    > [email protected]

    If you are Jobst Brandt ;-) or have been riding the Alps since you were a wee lad, stand up. If you
    are a mere mortal like Lance or Jan sitting down works too. Sitting down may require somewhat lower
    gearing. Mashing is not good on the knees. If you are not racing do what feels comfortable, remember
    a lot of advice is written by folks training for racing, non racers can just listen to their bodies.

    Scott G. Remember the knees you save, may be your own.
     
  10. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Scott Goldsmith) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > If you are Jobst Brandt ;-) or have been riding the Alps since you were a wee lad, stand up. If
    > you are a mere mortal like Lance or Jan sitting down works too.

    Jan sits down almost all the time. That's why everytime Lance stands up, he easily dumps Jan.
    Standing allows you to generate alot more power than sitting, but more power requires more energy,
    especially for heavier riders.
     
  11. Peter Rollason wrote:

    > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?

    Depends how you define "best."

    Seated is more efficient. Standing is faster but more tiring.

    > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?

    That's correct.

    Sheldon "Depends On Your Priority" Brown +-------------------------------------------------+
    | What is good for you is what is good for you. | --Peter Chisholm |
    +-------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone
    617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  12. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > Peter Rollason wrote:
    >
    > > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    > Depends how you define "best."

    Best for me means a balance between speed and comfort (legs and lungs). Switching often between
    seated and standing works well for me to balance the two. Rarely do I see someone doing one or the
    other exclusively, but if my cadence drops below about 60, I will stand exclusively. Turning cranks
    in the saddle up a hill at a low cadence is uncomfortable, while the same cadence is quite
    comfortable while standing.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  13. Tango

    Tango Guest

    "Peter Rollason" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    >
    > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?
    >
    > [email protected]
    >
    >
    >
    >

    i prefer to mix it up but changes in gradient and wind can affect the way you climb.i went over
    snake pass in Derbyshire UK in driving hailstone 2 weeks ago and it was impossible to stay
    seated.that ride was very character building indeed !!
     
  14. > >What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?

    We've got an article on climbing on our website, at-

    http://www.chainreaction.com/hills.htm

    It doesn't much address the issue of standing vs sitting though. In general, you'll be more
    efficient while sitting, and you'll run considerably less risk of going anaerobic. You'll also find
    it easier to breathe at a "natural" pace while seated; when standing, one tends to syncronize their
    breathing with their pedal stroke, and that's *not* a good thing. The key, even while standing, is
    to be relaxed, and part of that involves breathing deeper and more slowly, as opposed to breathing
    shallow and gasping for breath.

    However... even though it may be more efficient being seated, it's generally not a good idea to
    remain in the saddle on a long, hard climb. Best to stand up once in a while and stretch yourself
    out a bit. Otherwise, you may find that your back begins to talk to you (and when your back talks to
    you, it's rarely a pleasant conversation). Maybe stand up and move around a bit on the bike every
    mile or so and you'll find yourself able to ride longer without difficulty.

    But, having said that, if I'm out of shape (frequently the case) and trying to get up a big hill as
    fast as possible, I need to force myself to stay in the saddle. Every time I stand up I find my
    speed dropping quite a bit when I sit back down, well below where it would have been had I stayed
    seated... and it takes a bit of time to recover from the anaerobic spurt, so your speed doesn't come
    back up as quickly as you'd like.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReaction.com

    "Jon Isaacs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    > >
    > >When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    >
    > >Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > >sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > >encourage downward power - but would seem to be faster ?
    >
    > Many issues and many different individuals. Pantani climbs seated for a
    while
    > then standing for a while, gives those muscles a change. Heart rate may
    be a
    > tad higher standing.
    >
    > Bottomline is you have to discover what works best for you as an an
    individual.
    >
    > jon isaacs
     
  15. In article <%[email protected]>, Mike Jacoubowsky
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >But, having said that, if I'm out of shape (frequently the case) and trying to get up a big hill as
    >fast as possible, I need to force myself to stay in the saddle. Every time I stand up I find my
    >speed dropping quite a bit when I sit back down, well below where it would have been had I stayed
    >seated... and it takes a bit of time to recover from the anaerobic spurt, so your speed doesn't
    >come back up as quickly as you'd like.

    I have had some similar experiences but found climbing out of the saddle a lot easier when I learned
    reduce the cadence a lot. Now I often shift 3-4 cogs from the low end of a 13-26 9spd cluster when I
    stand up for a stretch. (That's a stretch, not a sprint for the top!) Before I only shifted 1-2 cogs
    to stand up.

    The point is to keep from red-lining your engine by spinning too fast while standing. I try to keep
    the effort the same as when seated. The HRM helps tell you if you got it right. I don't worry about
    the speed as much as my ability to stand up without increasing my effort.

    When seated I tend to be a fast spinner which I think encouraged me to have a standing cadence
    that was too fast - if the gear is too low when you stand, it's just a lot more work, this is
    somewhat counter-intuitive for a die-hard spinner. Also, having ridden 5-7 speed clusters for many
    years, I learned to "shift up one" when I stand to climb. But now the gearing jumps are smaller
    (eg, 9-speed cassette with the same range as your old 6-speed freewheel) so that learned behavior
    is no longer correct.

    --Paul
     
  16. Cy Galley

    Cy Galley Guest

    I have a friend that doesn't even have a saddle on his bike so he is always standing. Since he is
    always standing, he can't spin so his large ring is a 60 tooth. Works for him as he commutes to work
    every day regardless of the weather.

    Cy Galley - Webmaster www.qcbc.org

    "tango" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Peter Rollason" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > What the best way to get up an hill (road bike)?
    > >
    > > When I started cycling I read somewhere to stay in your saddle
    > >
    > > Now I have mastered this - although I do feel I could get up the hills faster out of the saddle,
    > > sitting gives a more controlled ride, and encourages you to pull up - where as standing seems to
    > > encourage
    downward
    > > power - but would seem to be faster ?
    > >
    > > [email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > i prefer to mix it up but changes in gradient and wind can affect the way you climb.i went over
    > snake pass in Derbyshire UK in driving hailstone 2 weeks ago and it was impossible to stay
    > seated.that ride was very
    character
    > building indeed !!
     
  17. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%9V4a.32760$A%[email protected]...

    > I have had some similar experiences but found climbing out
    of the
    > saddle a lot easier when I learned reduce the cadence a
    lot. Now
    > I often shift 3-4 cogs from the low end of a 13-26 9spd
    cluster
    > when I stand up for a stretch. (That's a stretch, not a
    sprint for
    > the top!) Before I only shifted 1-2 cogs to stand up.

    That's what I do too -- shift up 3 gears and stand. On steep, bumpy climbs off road, I frequently
    stand over the bumpier bits, leaving the rear cogs the same but shifting between the small and
    middle chainrings (which is about three gears' worth too).

    > The point is to keep from red-lining your engine by
    spinning too
    > fast while standing. I try to keep the effort the same as
    when
    > seated. The HRM helps tell you if you got it right. I
    don't worry
    > about the speed as much as my ability to stand up without
    increasing
    > my effort.

    I don't use an HRM, but that's exactly what I feel.

    Matt O.
     
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