Size Advice - Giant OCR1 for 5' 5" lady



adapshine

New Member
Sep 12, 2006
4
0
0
Greetings. I have decided to buy a rd bike for daily cummuting and touring. I am having a hard time deciding what size Giant OCR 1 to get - a small or extra small. At the store I had several people look at me and essentially say I could go with either and comfort is paramount, although I don't trust my "comfort" judgment as I haven't had enough rd experience. I am 5' 5" and coming from a mountain bike. Here is my experience with both sizes:

Small (53.1 Top Tube): I feel a bit too stretched out on the small so the suggestion was to exchange the stem for a 70 (the one I tried is a 90) and exchange the handle bars for something narrower to suit my shoulder width better. The seat is at approximately the same height as the handle bars and is pushed as far forward as it will go (with the new stem I would probably push it back a bit). With these changes, if i ride for a month and decide I'm still stretched out, I'm essentially screwed because there would be no more room for more changes to make reaching distance seem shorter.

XSmall (51.1 Top Tube): I am probably an inch closer to the handle bars, and my hands seem to naturally fall on the hoods, so I feel less strteched out than on the size Small. However, the saddle is approx 1 inch (possibly a bit more) higher than the handle bars, and there is no way to raise the handle bars to be level. So basically..the advantages of the extra small is that i can adjust seat, get a larger stem should I decide I want to stretch out more. BUT there is no room to raise the handle bars should I decide I would rather have my seat and my handle bars level. I don't know if a higher seat means I will be less comfortable.

Does anyone have any advice as to which would be the better size for me? I don't want to wind up with a bike size that is a bit big with no margin for adjustments, nor do i want to wind up regretting my decison of a bike that's too small! I'm sorta roped into one or the other at this point.

..I should mention I feel a bit of pull in my back by my neck when riding both sizes (although more when I was riding the small). I am assuming some discomfort would be normal when first getting a bike though?

Thanks for any advice you can provide!!
 

gclark8

Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,522
6
0
73
You have answered your own question. Your size falls between the two.

Have a look at a Felt 52cm. I am 5'7" and ride a Felt 53cm. My GF is 4'11" and rides a Felt F100 47cm, top tube is 50.5cm. She also has a Giant Upland Ladies bike, it is an XS (520mmTT), we had to turn the seat post head around the other way to shorten the top tube measurement (480mm).

If you decide to go with the Giant, then the XS will fit you better, use a 100mm adjustable stem. I hope the bike comes with 165mm cranks. ;)
 

adapshine

New Member
Sep 12, 2006
4
0
0
Thanks for the feedback!

Unfortunately there are very few stores around here so I am limited to what I can try.

Would you be concerned about the seat being higher than the handle bars in terms of comfort?

The other thing is that the seat post is close to it's max height - its still within it's limits, but I've heard there's some "ideal" seat post measure.

Thanks again for your comments.

gclark8 said:
You have answered your own question. Your size falls between the two.

Have a look at a Felt 52cm. I am 5'7" and ride a Felt 53cm. My GF is 4'11" and rides a Felt F100 47cm, top tube is 50.5cm. She also has a Giant Upland Ladies bike, it is an XS (520mmTT), we had to turn the seat post head around the other way to shorten the top tube measurement (480mm).

If you decide to go with the Giant, then the XS will fit you better, use a 100mm adjustable stem. I hope the bike comes with 165mm cranks. ;)
 

gclark8

Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,522
6
0
73
adapshine said:
Thanks for the feedback!

Unfortunately there are very few stores around here so I am limited to what I can try.

Would you be concerned about the seat being higher than the handle bars in terms of comfort?

The other thing is that the seat post is close to it's max height - its still within it's limits, but I've heard there's some "ideal" seat post measure.

Thanks again for your comments.
I still have both Jackie's bikes here. Her Felt is exactly the right size for her, BUT, she had a sore neck and too much weight on her hands to be comfortable. I fitted a 15mm LONGER (85->100mm) adjustable angle stem, set the up angle of the stem to 30 degrees and slid the seat forward 10mm. The top of the bars where they meet the stem are now 40mm above the centre of the saddle. She no longer has hand, sore neck or shoulder problems.

It sounds like the XS will be too small, try the S with the seat post turned around or look for a Zero Offset Seat Post (Thomson).
Try not to go under 90mm for the stem, some bikes get unstable if the Centre of Gravity is moved too far back. If you are raising the bars, bring the seat forward and try to bring the bars forward also.
 

adapshine

New Member
Sep 12, 2006
4
0
0
Thanks gclark8. What would the benefits of a offset seat post be? If I did this or switched the seat post, should I be concerned about the angle of my legs in relation to the pedals? When the guy at the store checked for the right angle for me, he found I should basically have my saddle in centre, not forward, despite the fact this makes me closer to the bars and therefore more comfortable.

--------------------

gclark8 said:
I still have both Jackie's bikes here. Her Felt is exactly the right size for her, BUT, she had a sore neck and too much weight on her hands to be comfortable. I fitted a 15mm LONGER (85->100mm) adjustable angle stem, set the up angle of the stem to 30 degrees and slid the seat forward 10mm. The top of the bars where they meet the stem are now 40mm above the centre of the saddle. She no longer has hand, sore neck or shoulder problems.

It sounds like the XS will be too small, try the S with the seat post turned around or look for a Zero Offset Seat Post (Thomson).
Try not to go under 90mm for the stem, some bikes get unstable if the Centre of Gravity is moved too far back. If you are raising the bars, bring the seat forward and try to bring the bars forward also.
 

gclark8

Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,522
6
0
73
adapshine said:
Thanks gclark8. What would the benefits of a offset seat post be? If I did this or switched the seat post, should I be concerned about the angle of my legs in relation to the pedals? When the guy at the store checked for the right angle for me, he found I should basically have my saddle in centre, not forward, despite the fact this makes me closer to the bars and therefore more comfortable.

--------------------
This "right angle" is only his opinion. More comfortable is right. The angle can be from 70 to 80 degrees, mostly its personal preference. The steeper angles usually mean a higher cadence and suit runners. I use 75.5 on one bike and 77.5 on the other, Jackie is up to 78.5 on her Upland, she spins at over 90rpm on 152mm cranks. It is a shame you are limited to only two bikes to choose from. If I had you and the bike here, I would bring you forward (seat and bars) and up (stem angle) at the front.
 

adapshine

New Member
Sep 12, 2006
4
0
0
Thanks for your advice George. I have decided on the Small size with smaller width handle bars (they are currently a 42 so will get 40 or 38). I'm really looking forward to getting out there! Thanks again!
 

melslur

New Member
Oct 31, 2005
146
0
16
adapshine said:
Thanks for your advice George. I have decided on the Small size with smaller width handle bars (they are currently a 42 so will get 40 or 38). I'm really looking forward to getting out there! Thanks again!
FYI, in the Cycling Equipment forum, there is a thread of something like "List your height and frame size". Four people 5'5" listed their sizes as follows:1)48, 2)48, 3)49 and 4)52. So based on 4 other people, you probably should be on a 48-50. Of course a fitting at a bike shop may be more exact.