Skillet Cornbread---- need recipie

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ron G, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. Ron G

    Ron G Guest

    Hi--
    My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in a cast
    iron skillet.
    It seemed to have a nice crispy top to it, was not gooey moist in the
    center, yet not dried out.
    Just right, just a slab of butter on top, and it was super good.

    I'm about as newbie cook as you've ever met, but I would like to make this
    for me and my wife (her daughter).
    It would be a great "memory trip" for both of us.


    Are any cornbread box stuff any good at the grocery store?
    Or is home-made the best from scratch?
    Does it need a cover on the skillet to cook right but not end up gooey soft
    (I like kinda crusty crunchy top).
    Any good recipies, and tips or proceedures to make it come out good?

    Thanks----
    Ron :)
     
    Tags:


  2. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    http://bread.allrecipes.com/az/SkilltCrnBrd.asp

    Skillet Corn Bread


    INGREDIENTS:

    * 3 tablespoons margarine
    * 1/2 cup chopped onion
    * 1/2 cup chopped celery
    * 1 cup all-purpose flour
    * 1 cup yellow cornmeal
    * 3 tablespoons white sugar
    * 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
    * 1 teaspoon rubbed sage
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1 cup skim milk
    * 1 large eggs, lightly beaten
    * 1 (11 ounce) can no-salt-added whole-kernel corn, drained

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
    2. Melt margarine in a 9-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat.
    Add onion and celery; saute 3 minutes.
    3. Combine flour and the next 5 ingredients (flour through salt) in
    a large bowl. Add milk, egg, and onion mixture, stirring just until
    moist. Stir in corn. Pour batter into skillet.
    4. Bake at 425 degrees for 25 minutes or until a wooden pick
    inserted in center comes out clean.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://bread.allrecipes.com/az/ThBstCrnbrdYouEverEat.asp

    The Best Corn Bread You'll Ever Eat


    INGREDIENTS:

    * 1 egg
    * 1 1/3 cups milk
    * 1/4 cup vegetable oil
    * 2 cups self-rising corn meal mix
    * 1 (8 ounce) can cream-style corn
    * 1 cup sour cream

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. Heat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Grease a 9 inch iron
    skillet.
    2. In a large bowl, beat the egg. Add milk, oil, sour cream, cream
    corn, and cornmeal mix; stir until cornmeal is just dampened. Pour
    batter into greased skillet.
    3. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until knife inserted in center
    comes out clean.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://bread.allrecipes.com/az/AmsmntPrkCrnbrd.asp

    Amusement Park Cornbread


    INGREDIENTS:

    * 2/3 cup white sugar
    * 1 teaspoon salt
    * 1/3 cup butter, softened
    * 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    * 2 eggs
    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 3/4 cup cornmeal
    * 1 1/3 cups milk

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Lightly grease an
    8 inch skillet.
    2. In a large bowl, beat together sugar, salt, butter and vanilla
    until creamy. Stir in eggs one at a time, beating well after each
    addition. In a separate bowl, mix together flour, baking powder and
    cornmeal. Stir flour mixture into egg mixture alternately with the
    milk. Beat well until blended.
    3. Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until golden brown.
    Serve warm.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://bread.allrecipes.com/az/Cornbread.asp

    Cornbread I


    INGREDIENTS:

    * 1 cup buttermilk
    * 1 cup stone ground cornmeal
    * 1 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    * 1 egg
    * 1 tablespoon shortening

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). Melt the
    shortening in one 9 inch round iron skillet in the heating oven.
    2. Stir the cornmeal, salt and baking soda together. Add the egg and
    buttermilk and mix well.
    3. Remove skillet from the oven and pour the batter into the
    skillet, stirring the melted shortening into the batter.
    4. Bake at 450 degrees F (230 degrees C) for 30 to 40 minutes.
    Remove from oven when top of cornbread is brown and turn out on to a
    serving plate. Cut into wedges and serve immediately with butter.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://bread.allrecipes.com/az/RealSouthernCornbread.asp

    Real Southern Cornbread


    INGREDIENTS:

    * 2 cups cornmeal
    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 2 tablespoons baking powder
    * 2 eggs
    * 1 cup margarine, melted
    * 4 cups buttermilk

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. In a large bowl mix together the corn meal, flour, salt, and
    baking powder.
    2. In a separate bowl mix together the eggs, butter, and buttermilk.
    Add to the dry ingredients and stir until well blended.
    3. Heat a dry 12 inch cast iron skillet over high heat for 2
    minutes. Add corn oil to skillet, swirl oil around to coat bottom and
    sides. Leave remaining oil in pan. Return to high heat for 1 minute.
    4. Pour the cornbread batter into the skillet and cook on high heat
    until bubbles start to form in the center. Remove from stove.
    5. Bake in a preheated 400 degree F (200 degree C) oven for 40 to 50
    minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.
    Serve warm.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Rusty
     
  3. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    Stove Top Cornbread (using two skillits of the same size)

    2 tablespoon bacon drippings or Crisco
    3/4 cup flour
    3/4 cup corn meal
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    1/4 teaspoon baking soda
    1 egg, beaten
    1 buttermilk

    Place 1 tablespoon bacon drippings in each of 2 skillets and heat both
    over low heat. Combine flour, cornmeal, salt, baking powder and baking
    soda, egg and buttermilk. Heat #1 skillet to high, pour in batter;
    reduce heat to low and cook 10 to 15 minutes. Heat #2 skillet to high,
    flip bread to second pan; cover and cook on medium heat for 10 to 15
    minutes.

    Rusty
     
  4. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    http://www.marthastewart.com/page.jhtml?type=content&id=recipe1041&catid=cat249&navLevel=2&site=kids

    Skillet Cornbread

    Serves 8
    Here's a cornbread baked the old-fashioned way-on top of the stove.


    3/4 cup all-purpose flour

    2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

    5 tablespoons sugar

    1 teaspoon salt

    1 1/4 cups yellow cornmeal

    1/4 cup instant nonfat dry milk

    1 large egg

    3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

    Vegetable oil, for skillet


    1. Over low heat, heat a 9-inch cast-iron skillet with a cover.
    Mix flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, cornmeal, and nonfat dry milk in
    a large bowl.

    2. In a small bowl, whisk together egg, 3/4 cup water, and melted
    butter. Make a well in the center of dry ingredients, and pour the egg
    mixture into it. Stir until just combined.

    3. Brush bottom, sides, and inside of skillet lid with vegetable
    oil; pour in the batter. Cover, and cook over low heat until top feels
    almost dry, about 35 minutes (check the bottom occasionally to make
    sure it's not burning; lower heat if necessary). Invert onto the
    skillet cover; oil pan bottom again. Slide bread back into pan, and
    cook 5 minutes more, until dry and light brown. Transfer to a plate,
    let cool slightly, and cut into wedges.
     
  5. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    STOVE-TOP FRY-PAN CORN BREAD

    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    1 cup whole wheat flour
    2 tablespoons sugar (optional)
    1 tablespoon baking powder
    1 egg (or 2 tablespoons powdered eggs blended with a little water)
    1 cup milk (fresh or reconstituted milk powder)
    1/3 cup cooking oil

    Mix the dry ingredients. Beat the egg, milk, and oil together, then
    pour the liquid mixture into the dry mixture and blend with a spoon to
    batter consistency.

    Pour the batter into an oiled and preheated 10" cast-iron frying pan
    and cook, covered, on a slow stove. If you're using wood heat, elevate
    the fry pan slightly above the stove's surface by setting it atop the
    ring from a canning-jar lid. If you're using a gas or electric range,
    set the burner on low.

    Cook for 40 minutes (on a gas or electric appliance) to 2 hours (a
    slow-burning, woodfired stove can sometimes take that long) until the
    bread is done, or-if you're anything like us-until you grow tired
    of waiting and decide to eat it right now, done or not.
     
  6. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Ron G wrote:
    > Hi--
    > My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in
    > a cast iron skillet.


    I've never heard of baking cornbread on top of the stove. In a dutch oven
    with coals scooped over the top, yes (like camping outdoors). Or cornmeal
    pancakes. But not a pan of cornbread. Are you sure about this?

    Jill
     
  7. jmcquown wrote:
    > Ron G wrote:
    > > Hi--
    > > My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in
    > > a cast iron skillet.

    >
    > I've never heard of baking cornbread on top of the stove. In a dutch oven
    > with coals scooped over the top, yes (like camping outdoors). Or cornmeal
    > pancakes. But not a pan of cornbread. Are you sure about this?
    >
    > Jill



    Reckon she was making hoe cakes instead of a pan of cornbread?

    Rusty gave some fairly good cornbread recipes except not a darn one had
    any bacon grease in the recipe. All called for Crisco. :-(
     
  8. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    itsjoannotjoann wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Ron G wrote:
    >>> Hi--
    >>> My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in
    >>> a cast iron skillet.

    >>
    >> I've never heard of baking cornbread on top of the stove. In a
    >> dutch oven with coals scooped over the top, yes (like camping
    >> outdoors). Or cornmeal pancakes. But not a pan of cornbread. Are
    >> you sure about this?


    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    >
    > Reckon she was making hoe cakes instead of a pan of cornbread?
    >
    > Rusty gave some fairly good cornbread recipes except not a darn one
    > had
    > any bacon grease in the recipe. All called for Crisco. :-(


    I did bake cornbread on a charcoal grill when the electricity was out but it
    was in a cast iron skillet and I covered the grill... no idea what the OP is
    really talking about. I suppose it could be done uncovered on top of the
    stove but even 'quick breads' (unless they are pancake-type things) are
    baked, aren't they?

    Jill
    Jill
     
  9. "itsjoannotjoann" <[email protected]> hitched up their panties
    and posted news:[email protected]:

    >
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Ron G wrote:
    >> > Hi--
    >> > My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove,
    >> > in a cast iron skillet.

    >>
    >> I've never heard of baking cornbread on top of the stove. In a dutch
    >> oven with coals scooped over the top, yes (like camping outdoors).
    >> Or cornmeal pancakes. But not a pan of cornbread. Are you sure
    >> about this?
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    >
    > Reckon she was making hoe cakes instead of a pan of cornbread?
    >
    > Rusty gave some fairly good cornbread recipes except not a darn one
    > had any bacon grease in the recipe. All called for Crisco. :-(
    >
    >


    Bacon grease is good. Especially in cornbread recipes.

    Michael <- pork fat rules

    --
    “It requires a certain kind of mind to see beauty in a hamburger bun.”
    _Ray Kroc, creator of the McDonald's franchise
     
  10. On Tue 07 Feb 2006 08:52:05p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    itsjoannotjoann?

    >
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Ron G wrote:
    >> > Hi--
    >> > My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in
    >> > a cast iron skillet.

    >>
    >> I've never heard of baking cornbread on top of the stove. In a dutch
    >> oven with coals scooped over the top, yes (like camping outdoors). Or
    >> cornmeal pancakes. But not a pan of cornbread. Are you sure about
    >> this?
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    >
    > Reckon she was making hoe cakes instead of a pan of cornbread?
    >
    > Rusty gave some fairly good cornbread recipes except not a darn one had
    > any bacon grease in the recipe. All called for Crisco. :-(


    I use about 1/3 cup melted bacon fat in the batter for a 9-inch skillet of
    cornbread.



    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  11. Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    >
    > I use about 1/3 cup melted bacon fat in the batter for a 9-inch skillet of
    > cornbread.
    >
    >
    >


    I use wayne's recipe, and it rocks :)

    --

    saerah

    http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  12. Ron G wrote:
    > Hi--
    > My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in a cast
    > iron skillet.
    > It seemed to have a nice crispy top to it, was not gooey moist in the
    > center, yet not dried out.
    > Just right, just a slab of butter on top, and it was super good.
    >
    > I'm about as newbie cook as you've ever met, but I would like to make this
    > for me and my wife (her daughter).
    > It would be a great "memory trip" for both of us.
    >
    >
    > Are any cornbread box stuff any good at the grocery store?
    > Or is home-made the best from scratch?
    > Does it need a cover on the skillet to cook right but not end up gooey soft
    > (I like kinda crusty crunchy top).
    > Any good recipies, and tips or proceedures to make it come out good?
    >
    > Thanks----
    > Ron :)


    The quality of the cornmeal will make a better tasting cornbread. But,
    and I might get fussed at here, I just use pretty close to the recipe
    on the back of the cornmeal box (Perkin's I think).

    Oil up the iron skillet and get it hot in the oven first for 10 minutes
    (can't remember, but 400 maybe, whatever's on the box), before you put
    in the ingredients. Later, when its done, hopefully when you turn the
    skillet upside down the whole cornbread will come out. This gives a
    crunchy top. No goo. No top.

    - John
     
  13. On Wed 08 Feb 2006 01:08:30a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sarah
    bennett?

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I use about 1/3 cup melted bacon fat in the batter for a 9-inch skillet of
    >> cornbread.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I use wayne's recipe, and it rocks :)
    >


    Thank you, Saerah. I'm glad you like it!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  14. On Tue, 7 Feb 2006 21:10:26 -0600, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Ron G wrote:
    >> Hi--
    >> My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in
    >> a cast iron skillet.

    >
    >I've never heard of baking cornbread on top of the stove. In a dutch oven
    >with coals scooped over the top, yes (like camping outdoors). Or cornmeal
    >pancakes. But not a pan of cornbread. Are you sure about this?


    A method I've used is to pre-heat a greased cast iron skillet in the
    oven, pour the cornbread batter into the hot skillet and finish off in
    the oven. This gives a crisp bottom crust to the cornbread.

    If you were to try to cook the cornbread only on top off the stove, I
    assume you would have to pre-heat the skillet, add the batter, then,
    at some point, flip the cornbread to finish the top. Seems like more
    trouble than it's worth.
     
  15. On Wed 08 Feb 2006 05:36:28a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it J. Eric
    Durbin?

    > On Tue, 7 Feb 2006 21:10:26 -0600, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Ron G wrote:
    >>> Hi--
    >>> My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in a
    >>> cast iron skillet.

    >>
    >>I've never heard of baking cornbread on top of the stove. In a dutch
    >>oven with coals scooped over the top, yes (like camping outdoors). Or
    >>cornmeal pancakes. But not a pan of cornbread. Are you sure about
    >>this?

    >
    > A method I've used is to pre-heat a greased cast iron skillet in the
    > oven, pour the cornbread batter into the hot skillet and finish off in
    > the oven. This gives a crisp bottom crust to the cornbread.
    >
    > If you were to try to cook the cornbread only on top off the stove, I
    > assume you would have to pre-heat the skillet, add the batter, then,
    > at some point, flip the cornbread to finish the top. Seems like more
    > trouble than it's worth.


    That's the method I use, but I also flip the cornbread after it's done and
    bake an additional 5-7 minutes or so to give it an even crisper top.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  16. Switch

    Switch Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > That's the method I use, but I also flip the cornbread after it's done and
    > bake an additional 5-7 minutes or so to give it an even crisper top.


    I like the cornbread pans that have wedge shaped partitions in them
    makes a whole lot more corner :)

    don't forget to bring the pepper rings to the table

    and real butter is healthier than fake butter.
    *even roaches won't eat fake butter
     
  17. dodis

    dodis Guest

    I don't have a recipe, but the key is to have a preheated cast iron
    skillet with a cast iron lid. It is enclosed and keeps the heat in to
    'bake' just like in a dutch oven. I'm sure that the flip in the last 5
    minutes would help crisp up the top. We usually get cornbread when we
    visit the in-laws in Reynosa, Mexico. A small corner store makes it
    fresh in covered skillets all day long, usually using freshly trimmed &
    scraped corn, real lard, etc. It sure is difficult to stay low-carb in
    Mexico, but the high-fat portion of the diet is easy...

    Dodis
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, "Ron G" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Hi--
    > My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in a cast
    > iron skillet.
    > It seemed to have a nice crispy top to it, was not gooey moist in the
    > center, yet not dried out.
    > Just right, just a slab of butter on top, and it was super good.
    >
    > I'm about as newbie cook as you've ever met, but I would like to make this
    > for me and my wife (her daughter).
    > It would be a great "memory trip" for both of us.
    >
    >
    > Are any cornbread box stuff any good at the grocery store?
    > Or is home-made the best from scratch?
    > Does it need a cover on the skillet to cook right but not end up gooey soft
    > (I like kinda crusty crunchy top).
    > Any good recipies, and tips or proceedures to make it come out good?


    This is not stovetop, but I like it. It's from my Arkansas grandmother,
    and in the southern sytle, it has no sugar. That makes it great not only
    for eating, but also for making cornbread dressing.

    On New Year's day, it's nice to split open a piece and top it with
    black-eye peas cooked with a ham hock -- and don't forget a good dollop
    of the "pot liquor" from the peas.

    Corn Bread

    1-1/2 C corn meal (white or yellow)
    1 t baking soda
    1 t salt
    1 egg
    2 C buttermilk ("fake" buttermilk, from adding vinegar to fresh milk,
    will work too)

    Mix thoroughly. The batter will be thin. Mix just before the pan is
    ready.

    In hot oven (400 F), heat heavy pan (I use a cast-iron skillet) with 2 T
    bacon fat (anything else is _not_authentic_) until almost smoking. Add
    batter and bake until brown. When the bread pulls away from the sides of
    the pan, it's probably ready. Test it with a toothpick.

    Isaac
     
  19. On Wed 08 Feb 2006 09:28:01p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Isaac
    Wingfield?

    > In article <[email protected]>, "Ron G" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Hi--
    >> My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in a
    >> cast iron skillet.
    >> It seemed to have a nice crispy top to it, was not gooey moist in the
    >> center, yet not dried out.
    >> Just right, just a slab of butter on top, and it was super good.
    >>
    >> I'm about as newbie cook as you've ever met, but I would like to make
    >> this for me and my wife (her daughter).
    >> It would be a great "memory trip" for both of us.
    >>
    >>
    >> Are any cornbread box stuff any good at the grocery store?
    >> Or is home-made the best from scratch?
    >> Does it need a cover on the skillet to cook right but not end up gooey
    >> soft (I like kinda crusty crunchy top).
    >> Any good recipies, and tips or proceedures to make it come out good?

    >
    > This is not stovetop, but I like it. It's from my Arkansas grandmother,
    > and in the southern sytle, it has no sugar. That makes it great not only
    > for eating, but also for making cornbread dressing.
    >
    > On New Year's day, it's nice to split open a piece and top it with
    > black-eye peas cooked with a ham hock -- and don't forget a good dollop
    > of the "pot liquor" from the peas.
    >
    > Corn Bread
    >
    > 1-1/2 C corn meal (white or yellow)
    > 1 t baking soda
    > 1 t salt
    > 1 egg
    > 2 C buttermilk ("fake" buttermilk, from adding vinegar to fresh milk,
    > will work too)
    >
    > Mix thoroughly. The batter will be thin. Mix just before the pan is
    > ready.
    >
    > In hot oven (400 F), heat heavy pan (I use a cast-iron skillet) with 2 T
    > bacon fat (anything else is _not_authentic_) until almost smoking. Add
    > batter and bake until brown. When the bread pulls away from the sides of
    > the pan, it's probably ready. Test it with a toothpick.


    And very like my Mississippi grandmother's recipe. Best cornbread I've
    ever eaten or made.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  20. Patches

    Patches Guest

    Ron G wrote:
    > Hi--
    > My MIL (now deceased) used to make cornbread on top of the stove, in a cast
    > iron skillet.


    Im sure you're not hungry for it anymore

    maybe next time...

    just get creative. put things you like in it.

    like a can of BRAND NAME corn...
    sour cream
    bacon
    jalepenos

    if you add bacon, you can always grease the pan with the bacon
    drippings.
     
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