skinny cow update

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Joyce, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    tempt us. <G>

    When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable icecream
    in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry cheesecake and
    maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is really
    a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added icecreams,
    the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!

    Joyce
     
    Tags:


  2. Laura

    Laura Guest

    How did the price compare to the other low fat brands? Laura <hooked on the fudge bars>

    "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need
    another
    > new item to tempt us. <G>
    >
    > When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow
    items ...
    > scoopable icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip,
    > strawberry cheesecake and maybe another variety that is
    not coming
    > to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is really a nice switch
    from the
    > sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added
    icecreams, the
    > skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >
    > Joyce
     
  3. Isabela

    Isabela Guest

    Thanks for posting this....i am going to keep my eyes open for this.
    Your post did make me smile...when i first started trying to find the
    Skinny Cow produts, i made the huge mistake of getting 'Brown
    Cow'.....needless to say, the Brown Cow products have ALOT MORE
    POINTS! :)

    isabela

    Joyce <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    > tempt us. <G>
    >
    > When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable icecream
    > in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry cheesecake and
    > maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is
    > really a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added
    > icecreams, the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >
    > Joyce
     
  4. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    To tell the truth Laura, I didn't notice. <g> I am a horrid grocery shopper, tend to just buy what I
    want/need. It also didn't help that my grocer had a special ... buy one get one free. I believe it
    was right up there with the price of Breyer's/Edy's, etc. Definitely more expensive than the
    generic/cheaper brands
    - but right in the price range of most other brands. It sure is good though.

    Joyce

    On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 15:24:24 GMT, "Laura" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How did the price compare to the other low fat brands? Laura <hooked on the fudge bars>
    >
    >"Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need
    >another
    >> new item to tempt us. <G>
    >>
    >> When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow
    >items ...
    >> scoopable icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip,
    >> strawberry cheesecake and maybe another variety that is
    >not coming
    >> to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is really a nice switch
    >from the
    >> sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added
    >icecreams, the
    >> skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >>
    >> Joyce
     
  5. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    LOL! I haven't seen any Brown Cow products, guess I was lucky in that department. This new product
    wasn't in the same section as the bars and ice cream sandwiches, but the carton is so unique (the
    cow print again) that it really did stand out. I'm sure people thought I was nuts because I was so
    excited over silly icecream.

    Joyce

    On 3 Jan 2004 13:33:42 -0800, [email protected] (isabela) wrote:

    >Thanks for posting this....i am going to keep my eyes open for this. Your post did make me
    >smile...when i first started trying to find the Skinny Cow produts, i made the huge mistake of
    >getting 'Brown Cow'.....needless to say, the Brown Cow products have ALOT MORE POINTS! :)
    >
    >isabela
    >
    >
    >
    >Joyce <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    >> tempt us. <G>
    >>
    >> When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable
    >> icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry
    >> cheesecake and maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a
    >> vanilla, is really a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no
    >> sugar added icecreams, the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >>
    >> Joyce
     
  6. Fred

    Fred Guest

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/20040103/ap_on_he_me/food_portions

    That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!

    But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)

    Food Portions

    Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn, professor
    Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.

    The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    people are given, the more they will eat — regardless of whether they are full or think the food
    tastes good.

    "In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the University
    of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take responsibility
    because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."

    Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles to
    burn it off.

    His experiments — which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips — target the visual
    clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.

    In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are rigged
    with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.

    Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more than
    test subjects with regular bowls.

    "I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."

    James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences Department,
    who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a quart of soup.

    "I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    Painter said.

    Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.

    Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those with
    the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.

    Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to what an
    adequate portion should be.

    An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips in
    which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.

    The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much to
    eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every seventh
    chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.

    Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.

    For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those who
    used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.

    "The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on the
    study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they never say,
    'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."

    ___

    On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    >tempt us. <G>
    >
    >When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable icecream
    >in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry cheesecake and
    >maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is really
    >a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added icecreams,
    >the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >
    >Joyce
     
  7. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    Hey, thanks for sharing the article - I found it very interesting reading! Ok, guess that's where my
    analness comes into play. I don't have a problem with the tubs of icecream ... I weigh the scoops.
    <G> Yup, each and every danged time I have any - regardless as to a sundae or a float ... cup or
    bowl goes on the scale, every bit is accounted for.

    Funny, I no longer weigh or measure many things - but that danged icecream is one that I do.
    Probably a good thing, huh?

    Joyce

    On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:47:15 -0800, Fred <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/20040103/ap_on_he_me/food-
    >_portions
    >
    >
    >That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    >discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    >portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    >
    >But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)
    >
    >
    >Food Portions
    >
    >Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET
    >
    >CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn, professor
    >Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.
    >
    >The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    >people are given, the more they will eat — regardless of whether they are full or think the food
    >tastes good.
    >
    >"In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the University
    >of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take responsibility
    >because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."
    >
    >Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    >friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    >granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles to
    >burn it off.
    >
    >His experiments — which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips — target the visual
    >clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.
    >
    >In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are rigged
    >with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.
    >
    >Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more than
    >test subjects with regular bowls.
    >
    >"I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    >experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."
    >
    >James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences Department,
    >who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a quart of soup.
    >
    >"I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    >Painter said.
    >
    >Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    >moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    >containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.
    >
    >Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those with
    >the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.
    >
    >Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to what
    >an adequate portion should be.
    >
    >An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips in
    >which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.
    >
    >The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much to
    >eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every seventh
    >chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.
    >
    >Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.
    >
    >For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those who
    >used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.
    >
    >
    >
    >"The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on the
    >study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they never
    >say, 'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."
    >
    >___
    >
    >On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    >>tempt us. <G>
    >>
    >>When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable icecream
    >>in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry cheesecake and
    >>maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is
    >>really a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added
    >>icecreams, the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >>
    >>Joyce
     
  8. Schmoopie

    Schmoopie Guest

    > That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    > discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    > portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!

    I agree completely! The single portion servings make life easier. It's too hard to control scooping
    out of a quart or gallon container. Your bowl needs a lot to look full :)

    --
    Hugs, Schmoopie
     
  9. Julieb

    Julieb Guest

    I'm the same with pasta and rice. I can eyeball a piece of meat or breakfast cereal, but I don't
    trust myself with those starches. If I ever let myself buy a full carton of icecream again rather
    than single serve tubs, I may have to go the weighing option for that as well.

    --
    Julie.
    93.5/72.7/74 (WW)/72 (Personal) kg
    93.5/72.7/1.8 (WW)/158 (Personal) lb

    "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hey, thanks for sharing the article - I found it very interesting reading!
    Ok,
    > guess that's where my analness comes into play. I don't have a problem
    with the
    > tubs of icecream ... I weigh the scoops. <G> Yup, each and every danged
    time I
    > have any - regardless as to a sundae or a float ... cup or bowl goes on
    the scale,
    > every bit is accounted for.
    >
    > Funny, I no longer weigh or measure many things - but that danged icecream
    is one
    > that I do. Probably a good thing, huh?
    >
    > Joyce
    >
    > On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:47:15 -0800, Fred <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    > >
    >
    >http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/2004
    94/ap_on_he_me/food_portions
    > >
    > >
    > >That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    > >discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    > >portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    > >
    > >But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)
    > >
    > >
    > >Food Portions
    > >
    > >Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET
    > >
    > >CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn, professor
    > >Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.
    > >
    > >The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    > >people are given, the more they will eat - regardless of whether they are full or think the food
    > >tastes good.
    > >
    > >"In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the
    > >University of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take
    > >responsibility because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."
    > >
    > >Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    > >friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    > >granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles to
    > >burn it off.
    > >
    > >His experiments - which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips - target the visual
    > >clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.
    > >
    > >In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are
    > >rigged with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.
    > >
    > >Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more
    > >than test subjects with regular bowls.
    > >
    > >"I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    > >experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."
    > >
    > >James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences Department,
    > >who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a quart of soup.
    > >
    > >"I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    > >Painter said.
    > >
    > >Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    > >moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    > >containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.
    > >
    > >Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those with
    > >the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.
    > >
    > >Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to what
    > >an adequate portion should be.
    > >
    > >An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips in
    > >which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.
    > >
    > >The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much to
    > >eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every seventh
    > >chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.
    > >
    > >Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.
    > >
    > >For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those who
    > >used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >"The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on the
    > >study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they never
    > >say, 'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."
    > >
    > >___
    > >
    > >On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need
    another
    > >>new item to tempt us. <G>
    > >>
    > >>When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow
    items ...
    > >>scoopable icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla,
    mint
    > >>chocolate chip, strawberry cheesecake and maybe another variety that is
    not coming
    > >>to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is really a nice
    switch from the
    > >>sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added
    icecreams, the
    > >>skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    > >>
    > >>Joyce
     
  10. This is going to sound really stupid, but weighing my ice cream as the the means of measure is not
    something that had ever occurred to me before. It makes perfect sense since ice cream doesn't fit
    nicely in a measuring cup. Thanks so much for the tip. Honestly. I mean, this might be just the
    trick to help me not cheat. Or if I do, to know exactly by how much I'm cheating.

    The things I learn from this group.

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 02:59:32 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hey, thanks for sharing the article - I found it very interesting reading! Ok, guess that's where
    >my analness comes into play. I don't have a problem with the tubs of icecream ... I weigh the
    >scoops. <G> Yup, each and every danged time I have any - regardless as to a sundae or a float ...
    >cup or bowl goes on the scale, every bit is accounted for.
    >
    >Funny, I no longer weigh or measure many things - but that danged icecream is one that I do.
    >Probably a good thing, huh?
    >
    >Joyce
    >
    >On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:47:15 -0800, Fred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/20040103/ap_on_he_me/food_-
    >>portions
    >>
    >>
    >>That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    >>discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    >>portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    >>
    >>But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)
    >>
    >>
    >>Food Portions
    >>
    >>Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET
    >>
    >>CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn, professor
    >>Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.
    >>
    >>The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    >>people are given, the more they will eat — regardless of whether they are full or think the food
    >>tastes good.
    >>
    >>"In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the University
    >>of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take responsibility
    >>because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."
    >>
    >>Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    >>friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    >>granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles to
    >>burn it off.
    >>
    >>His experiments — which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips — target the visual
    >>clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.
    >>
    >>In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are rigged
    >>with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.
    >>
    >>Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more
    >>than test subjects with regular bowls.
    >>
    >>"I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    >>experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."
    >>
    >>James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences Department,
    >>who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a quart of soup.
    >>
    >>"I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    >>Painter said.
    >>
    >>Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    >>moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    >>containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.
    >>
    >>Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those with
    >>the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.
    >>
    >>Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to what
    >>an adequate portion should be.
    >>
    >>An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips in
    >>which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>
    >>The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much to
    >>eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every seventh
    >>chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>
    >>Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.
    >>
    >>For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those who
    >>used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>"The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on the
    >>study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they never
    >>say, 'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."
    >>
    >>___
    >>
    >>On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    >>>tempt us. <G>
    >>>
    >>>When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable
    >>>icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry
    >>>cheesecake and maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a
    >>>vanilla, is really a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no
    >>>sugar added icecreams, the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >>>
    >>>Joyce

    Prairie Roots
    232/167/WW goal 145 joined WW Online 22-Feb-2003
     
  11. Fred

    Fred Guest

    Yeah, but I can see _ME_ - aw, what's another spoonful. At the moment, tubs of skinny cow are
    exiled. My secretary agrees with you - it tastes really great. Weighing or measuring volume - no
    way. Plus with the ice cream sandwiches, I don't have to dirty a dish and spoon and meaure (G)

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 02:59:32 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hey, thanks for sharing the article - I found it very interesting reading! Ok, guess that's where
    >my analness comes into play. I don't have a problem with the tubs of icecream ... I weigh the
    >scoops. <G> Yup, each and every danged time I have any - regardless as to a sundae or a float ...
    >cup or bowl goes on the scale, every bit is accounted for.
    >
    >Funny, I no longer weigh or measure many things - but that danged icecream is one that I do.
    >Probably a good thing, huh?
    >
    >Joyce
    >
    >On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:47:15 -0800, Fred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/20040103/ap_on_he_me/food_-
    >>portions
    >>
    >>
    >>That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    >>discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    >>portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    >>
    >>But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)
    >>
    >>
    >>Food Portions
    >>
    >>Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET
    >>
    >>CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn, professor
    >>Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.
    >>
    >>The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    >>people are given, the more they will eat — regardless of whether they are full or think the food
    >>tastes good.
    >>
    >>"In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the University
    >>of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take responsibility
    >>because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."
    >>
    >>Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    >>friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    >>granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles to
    >>burn it off.
    >>
    >>His experiments — which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips — target the visual
    >>clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.
    >>
    >>In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are rigged
    >>with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.
    >>
    >>Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more
    >>than test subjects with regular bowls.
    >>
    >>"I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    >>experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."
    >>
    >>James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences Department,
    >>who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a quart of soup.
    >>
    >>"I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    >>Painter said.
    >>
    >>Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    >>moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    >>containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.
    >>
    >>Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those with
    >>the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.
    >>
    >>Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to what
    >>an adequate portion should be.
    >>
    >>An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips in
    >>which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>
    >>The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much to
    >>eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every seventh
    >>chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>
    >>Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.
    >>
    >>For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those who
    >>used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>"The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on the
    >>study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they never
    >>say, 'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."
    >>
    >>___
    >>
    >>On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    >>>tempt us. <G>
    >>>
    >>>When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable
    >>>icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry
    >>>cheesecake and maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a
    >>>vanilla, is really a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no
    >>>sugar added icecreams, the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >>>
    >>>Joyce
     
  12. Fred

    Fred Guest

    agree

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 19:40:42 GMT, Schmoopie <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    >> discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    >> portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    >
    >I agree completely! The single portion servings make life easier. It's too hard to control scooping
    >out of a quart or gallon container. Your bowl needs a lot to look full :)
     
  13. I have trouble with pasta and rice too. Now that I have an electronic kitchen scale keeping
    track of those items will be easier. Up until now I've been just measuring the cooked items in a
    1 cup measure.

    "JulieB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    berlin.de...
    > I'm the same with pasta and rice. I can eyeball a piece of meat or breakfast cereal, but I don't
    > trust myself with those starches. If I ever let myself buy a full carton of icecream again rather
    > than single serve tubs, I may have to go the weighing option for that as well.
    >
    > --
    > Julie.
    > 93.5/72.7/74 (WW)/72 (Personal) kg
    > 205.7/159.9/162.8 (WW)/158 (Personal) lb
    >
    > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Hey, thanks for sharing the article - I found it very interesting
    reading!
    > Ok,
    > > guess that's where my analness comes into play. I don't have a problem
    > with the
    > > tubs of icecream ... I weigh the scoops. <G> Yup, each and every danged
    > time I
    > > have any - regardless as to a sundae or a float ... cup or bowl goes on
    > the scale,
    > > every bit is accounted for.
    > >
    > > Funny, I no longer weigh or measure many things - but that danged
    icecream
    > is one
    > > that I do. Probably a good thing, huh?
    > >
    > > Joyce
    > >
    > > On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:47:15 -0800, Fred <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
    >http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/2004
    > 0103/ap_on_he_me/food_portions
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    > > >discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    > > >portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    > > >
    > > >But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >Food Portions
    > > >
    > > >Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET
    > > >
    > > >CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn,
    > > >professor Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.
    > > >
    > > >The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    > > >people are given, the more they will eat - regardless of whether they are full or think the
    > > >food tastes good.
    > > >
    > > >"In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the
    > > >University of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take
    > > >responsibility because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."
    > > >
    > > >Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    > > >friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    > > >granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles
    > > >to burn it off.
    > > >
    > > >His experiments - which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips - target the visual
    > > >clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.
    > > >
    > > >In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are
    > > >rigged with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.
    > > >
    > > >Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more
    > > >than test subjects with regular bowls.
    > > >
    > > >"I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    > > >experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."
    > > >
    > > >James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences
    > > >Department, who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a
    > > >quart of soup.
    > > >
    > > >"I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    > > >Painter said.
    > > >
    > > >Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    > > >moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    > > >containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.
    > > >
    > > >Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those
    > > >with the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.
    > > >
    > > >Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to
    > > >what an adequate portion should be.
    > > >
    > > >An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips
    > > >in which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.
    > > >
    > > >The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much
    > > >to eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every
    > > >seventh chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.
    > > >
    > > >Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.
    > > >
    > > >For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those
    > > >who used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >"The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on
    > > >the study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they
    > > >never say, 'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."
    > > >
    > > >___
    > > >
    > > >On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >>I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we
    need
    > another
    > > >>new item to tempt us. <G>
    > > >>
    > > >>When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow
    > items ...
    > > >>scoopable icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla,
    > mint
    > > >>chocolate chip, strawberry cheesecake and maybe another variety that
    is
    > not coming
    > > >>to my mind at the moment. I picked up a vanilla, is really a nice
    > switch from the
    > > >>sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no sugar added
    > icecreams, the
    > > >>skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    > > >>
    > > >>Joyce
    >
     
  14. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    That's exactly why I started doing it ... wasn't about to dirty up a measuring cup, as well as a
    bowl - and didn't feel like eating out of a measuring cup. <G> But I know icecream is one of those
    items I could get in trouble with, so onto the scale it went. I still stick with it now. At least if
    I feel like I want a bigger serving, I know what I have to do to accomodate it.

    Joyce

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 19:30:11 -0600, Prairie Roots <[email protected]> wrote:

    >This is going to sound really stupid, but weighing my ice cream as the the means of measure is not
    >something that had ever occurred to me before. It makes perfect sense since ice cream doesn't fit
    >nicely in a measuring cup. Thanks so much for the tip. Honestly. I mean, this might be just the
    >trick to help me not cheat. Or if I do, to know exactly by how much I'm cheating.
    >
    >The things I learn from this group.
    >
    >On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 02:59:32 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Hey, thanks for sharing the article - I found it very interesting reading! Ok, guess that's where
    >>my analness comes into play. I don't have a problem with the tubs of icecream ... I weigh the
    >>scoops. <G> Yup, each and every danged time I have any - regardless as to a sundae or a float ...
    >>cup or bowl goes on the scale, every bit is accounted for.
    >>
    >>Funny, I no longer weigh or measure many things - but that danged icecream is one that I do.
    >>Probably a good thing, huh?
    >>
    >>Joyce
    >>
    >>On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:47:15 -0800, Fred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/20040103/ap_on_he_me/food-
    >>>_portions
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    >>>discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    >>>portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    >>>
    >>>But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Food Portions
    >>>
    >>>Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET
    >>>
    >>>CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn, professor
    >>>Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.
    >>>
    >>>The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    >>>people are given, the more they will eat — regardless of whether they are full or think the food
    >>>tastes good.
    >>>
    >>>"In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the
    >>>University of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take
    >>>responsibility because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."
    >>>
    >>>Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    >>>friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    >>>granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles to
    >>>burn it off.
    >>>
    >>>His experiments — which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips — target the visual
    >>>clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.
    >>>
    >>>In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are
    >>>rigged with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.
    >>>
    >>>Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more
    >>>than test subjects with regular bowls.
    >>>
    >>>"I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    >>>experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."
    >>>
    >>>James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences Department,
    >>>who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a quart of soup.
    >>>
    >>>"I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    >>>Painter said.
    >>>
    >>>Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    >>>moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    >>>containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.
    >>>
    >>>Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those with
    >>>the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.
    >>>
    >>>Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to what
    >>>an adequate portion should be.
    >>>
    >>>An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips in
    >>>which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>>
    >>>The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much to
    >>>eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every seventh
    >>>chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>>
    >>>Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.
    >>>
    >>>For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those who
    >>>used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>"The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on the
    >>>study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they never
    >>>say, 'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."
    >>>
    >>>___
    >>>
    >>>On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    >>>>tempt us. <G>
    >>>>
    >>>>When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable
    >>>>icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry
    >>>>cheesecake and maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a
    >>>>vanilla, is really a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no
    >>>>sugar added icecreams, the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >>>>
    >>>>Joyce
    >
    >Prairie Roots
    >232/167/WW goal 145 joined WW Online 22-Feb-2003
     
  15. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    I guess for *me* worrying about one extra spoonful doesn't come into play very much. I am not really
    an icecream person. I have had one bowl since I brought the tub home last week. Those skinny cow
    sandwiches that were bought before Christmas ... are still in the freezer, only 1 removed from the
    package. Don't get me wrong, I do like icecream - but it isn't one of those items I tend to crave on
    a daily basis ... more of something that I really have to be in the mood for. I'm still going to
    stick with weighing it. <G>

    Joyce

    On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 19:43:08 -0800, Fred <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yeah, but I can see _ME_ - aw, what's another spoonful. At the moment, tubs of skinny cow are
    >exiled. My secretary agrees with you - it tastes really great. Weighing or measuring volume - no
    >way. Plus with the ice cream sandwiches, I don't have to dirty a dish and spoon and meaure (G)
    >
    >On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 02:59:32 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Hey, thanks for sharing the article - I found it very interesting reading! Ok, guess that's where
    >>my analness comes into play. I don't have a problem with the tubs of icecream ... I weigh the
    >>scoops. <G> Yup, each and every danged time I have any - regardless as to a sundae or a float ...
    >>cup or bowl goes on the scale, every bit is accounted for.
    >>
    >>Funny, I no longer weigh or measure many things - but that danged icecream is one that I do.
    >>Probably a good thing, huh?
    >>
    >>Joyce
    >>
    >>On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:47:15 -0800, Fred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=541&ncid=751&e=6&u=/ap/20040103/ap_on_he_me/food-
    >>>_portions
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>That's why I will NOT buy this new item. Funny, just this morning (when it was MINUS 14F) I was
    >>>discussing the info on the above link and that certain things, including Skinny Cows, limited
    >>>portions and that was why they were "good!" A TUB will make me a TUB!!!!
    >>>
    >>>But for this who want instant info rather than a link (sorry for length and copyright)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Food Portions
    >>>
    >>>Sat Jan 3, 3:07 PM ET
    >>>
    >>>CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With self-refilling bowls of soup and jumbo buckets of stale popcorn, professor
    >>>Brian Wansink has identified one culprit for U.S. obesity: excessive food portions.
    >>>
    >>>The University of Illinois researcher has set up several food experiments that show the more
    >>>people are given, the more they will eat — regardless of whether they are full or think the food
    >>>tastes good.
    >>>
    >>>"In the obesity war, portion size is the first casualty," said Wansink, who founded the
    >>>University of Illinois' Food & Brand Lab. "It's easy to point at, and we don't have to take
    >>>responsibility because we can blame the restaurant or the packaged food manufacturer."
    >>>
    >>>Wansink and other researchers hope the results can help the federal government devise more user-
    >>>friendly nutrition labels for packaged foods. For example, instead of stating that a handful of
    >>>granola has 200 calories, the label instead could say the consumer would have to walk 2 miles to
    >>>burn it off.
    >>>
    >>>His experiments — which have included tomato soup, popcorn and potato chips — target the visual
    >>>clues people use to tell them it's time to stop eating.
    >>>
    >>>In the soup experiment, participants come to the lab expecting a taste test. Some bowls are
    >>>rigged with hidden tubes that keep them full, while others are not.
    >>>
    >>>Over two years of the experiment, students with bottomless bowls tended to eat 40 percent more
    >>>than test subjects with regular bowls.
    >>>
    >>>"I wasn't aware of it," said Nina Huesgen, one of the students who got a trick bowl in a recent
    >>>experiment. "That's why I feel so filled up, I guess."
    >>>
    >>>James Painter, chairman of Eastern Illinois University's Family and Consumer Sciences Department,
    >>>who collaborated with Wansink on the experiment, said one student drank almost a quart of soup.
    >>>
    >>>"I said, 'What were you doing?' And he said, 'I was trying to reach the bottom of the bowl,'"
    >>>Painter said.
    >>>
    >>>Another telling experiment came outside Philadelphia, where Wansink offered free popcorn to
    >>>moviegoers at a $1 movie theater. Half the audience was given fresh popcorn, either in small
    >>>containers or in jumbo buckets; half received 14-day-old popcorn in small and jumbo containers.
    >>>
    >>>Even though 82 percent of the people with the old popcorn reported it tasted terrible, those with
    >>>the jumbo buckets ate 33 percent more than those with the smaller container.
    >>>
    >>>Wansink has come up with ways the food industry could help, such as offering visual clues to what
    >>>an adequate portion should be.
    >>>
    >>>An experiment with Lay's Stax potato chips gave one group regular chips, a second group chips in
    >>>which every seventh chip was red, and a third group chips in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>>
    >>>The groups weren't told the reason for the red chips but still used them to determine how much to
    >>>eat, Wansink said. The participants who ate the least had the potato chips in which every seventh
    >>>chip was red, followed by the group in which every 14th chip was red.
    >>>
    >>>Such research has produced commonsense tips for the weight-conscious.
    >>>
    >>>For example, people who drank out of short, fat glasses consumed considerably more than those who
    >>>used tall, skinny glasses, even though the glasses held the same amount.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>"The tendency we have is to focus on heights instead of widths," Wansink wrote in a report on the
    >>>study. "That's why, for instance, people say, 'Boy, is the St. Louis Arch high.' But they never
    >>>say, 'Boy, is it wide,' even though the dimensions are identical."
    >>>
    >>>___
    >>>
    >>>On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 04:11:09 -0600, Joyce <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I'm sure you all are just holding your breath on this one - like we need another new item to
    >>>>tempt us. <G>
    >>>>
    >>>>When at the store the other day I noticed a display of new skinny cow items ... scoopable
    >>>>icecream in quart sized tubs! My local store had vanilla, mint chocolate chip, strawberry
    >>>>cheesecake and maybe another variety that is not coming to my mind at the moment. I picked up a
    >>>>vanilla, is really a nice switch from the sandwiches and bars. As much as I like the no fat/no
    >>>>sugar added icecreams, the skinny cow stuff is definitely better!
    >>>>
    >>>>Joyce
     
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