Skipping and bouncing to cure shin splints?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Apr 10, 2006.

  1. Owen Anderson and Walt Reynolds are prescribing a lot of skipping and
    bouncing exercises for shin splints. Is this smart?
     
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  2. Dot

    Dot Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Owen Anderson and Walt Reynolds are prescribing a lot of skipping and
    > bouncing exercises for shin splints. Is this smart?
    >


    You might want to post a link. In particular, are they saying to "cure"
    or "prevent" shin splints. What are the protocols and what assumptions
    about basic strength / conditioning are they making?

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people"
    -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  3. bluezfolk

    bluezfolk Guest

    I've found that running on a softer surface helps.

    Eric
     
  4. Kaz Kylheku

    Kaz Kylheku Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Owen Anderson and Walt Reynolds are prescribing a lot of skipping and
    > bouncing exercises for shin splints. Is this smart?


    No, it's completely moronic.
     
  5. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Dot wrote:
    > sl[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Owen Anderson and Walt Reynolds are prescribing a lot of skipping and
    >> bouncing exercises for shin splints. Is this smart?
    >>

    >
    > You might want to post a link. In particular, are they saying to "cure"
    > or "prevent" shin splints. What are the protocols and what assumptions
    > about basic strength / conditioning are they making?
    >
    > Dot
    >


    I assume this is the link:
    http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0161.htm

    Note the exercises are primarily for prevention. However,

    "If you have a mild case of MTSS (your shin hurts moderately, and only
    after workouts), immediately cut your weekly mileage by about 30 per
    cent, and start doing our recommended exercises (we're assuming that
    your busy schedule prevented you from carrying out the routines
    faithfully, allowing MTSS to crop up). Start easily with the exercises,
    doing only one set of each, and stop if you feel any pain. Ice the
    affected area down thoroughly after activity, and of course keep the
    whole area as loose and flexible as possible."

    "If you have a somewhat tougher case of MTSS (mild pain crops up during
    workouts but doesn't seem to slow you down much), trim weekly mileage by
    around 50 per cent, ice and stretch religiously, consider taking
    non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (but only if you are not
    prone to the gastrointestinal upsets which have been linked with these
    compounds), and become a devotee of our shin-strengthening exercises
    (start gradually with them, though, since they can further inflame
    tender shins if overdone)."

    Note the cautions: "stop if you feel any pain" and "start gradually with
    them, though, since they can further inflame tender shins if overdone".


    I've done some, but not all of their exercises, and I do find they help
    strengthen my legs. (as temperatures warm and ground thaws, I'll
    probably resume some of them) As their article suggests, I think some of
    the exercises can probably be done if mild shin splints AND they don't
    cause any pain. But chances are a person got shin splints by not
    listening to their body, which means they may not listen to it during
    rehab - or haven't developed good communications with their body yet.

    Some gentle exercises can help healing. Wall shin raises (#1), maybe
    heel step downs (#2), toe and heel walking (#1 and #2) look reasonable
    for rehab, keeping reps low and following directions. I wouldn't
    progress beyond those while still healing. You might also consider
    exercises to strengthen achilles and make it more flexible, as that
    could become an issue if you eventually (after shin splints healed)
    progress into bounding and skipping. BUT use caution with your
    progression rates.

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people"
    -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
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