Slightly OT: Its amazing we survived...

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bb, Sep 24, 2003.

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  1. Bb

    Bb Guest

    According to today's American regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 30's,
    40's, 50's, 60's, 70's or even the early 80's, probably shouldn't have survived.

    Our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paint.

    We had no childproof lids or locks on medicine bottles, doors, or cabinets, and when we rode our
    bikes, we had no helmets.

    Not to mention the risks we took hitchhiking ...

    As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pickup
    truck on a warm day was always a special treat.

    We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle. Horrors!

    We ate cupcakes, bread and butter, and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we were never overweight
    because we were always outside playing.

    We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle, and no one actually died from this.

    We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then rode down the hill, only to
    find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve
    the problem.

    We would leave home in the morning and play all day , as long as we were back when the street lights
    came on. No one was able to reach us all day. No cell phones. Unthinkable!

    We did not have Play stations, Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable,
    video tape movies, surround sound, personal cell phones, personal computers, or Internet chat rooms.

    We had friends! We went outside and found them.

    We played dodge ball, and sometimes, the ball would really hurt. We fell out of trees, got cut and
    broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. They were accidents. No one
    was to blame but us. Remember accidents?

    We had fights and punched each other and got black and blue and learned to get over it.

    We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen, we did not
    put out any eyes.

    We rode bikes or walked to a friend's home and knocked on the door, or rang the bell or just walked
    in and talked to them.

    Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with
    disappointment.

    Some students weren't as smart as others, so they failed a grade and were held back to repeat the
    same grade. Horrors!

    Tests were not adjusted for any reason.

    Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected.

    The idea of parents bailing us out if we got in trouble in school or broke a law was unheard of.
    They actually sided with the school or the law. Imagine that!

    This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers, and inventors, ever.

    We had freedom, failure, success, and responsibility --- and we learned how to deal with it. And
    you're one of them!

    Congratulations.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
    Tags:


  2. Greg P.

    Greg P. Guest

    Awesome post dude. I totally agree. This is some funny but true shit. What is up with this new
    generation? Oops, I touched you...how much will that suit cost me?

    Anyway, great post!

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | According to today's American regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 30's,
    | 40's, 50's, 60's, 70's or even the early 80's,
    probably
    | shouldn't have survived.
    |
    | Our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paint.
    |
    | We had no childproof lids or locks on medicine bottles, doors, or cabinets, and when we rode our
    | bikes, we had no helmets.
    |
    | Not to mention the risks we took hitchhiking ...
    |
    | As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pickup
    | truck on a warm day was always a special treat.
    |
    | We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle. Horrors!
    |
    | We ate cupcakes, bread and butter, and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we were never
    | overweight because we were always outside playing.
    |
    | We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle, and no one actually died from this.
    |
    | We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then rode down the hill, only to find
    | out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the
    | problem.
    |
    | We would leave home in the morning and play all day , as long as we were back when the street
    | lights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. No cell phones. Unthinkable!
    |
    | We did not have Play stations, Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on
    | cable, video tape movies, surround sound, personal cell phones, personal computers, or Internet
    | chat rooms.
    |
    | We had friends! We went outside and found them.
    |
    | We played dodge ball, and sometimes, the ball would really hurt. We fell out of trees, got cut and
    | broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. They were accidents. No
    | one was to blame but us. Remember accidents?
    |
    | We had fights and punched each other and got black and blue and learned to get over it.
    |
    | We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen, we did
    | not put out any eyes.
    |
    | We rode bikes or walked to a friend's home and knocked on the door, or rang the bell or just
    | walked in and talked to them.
    |
    | Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal
    | with disappointment.
    |
    | Some students weren't as smart as others, so they failed a grade and were held back to repeat the
    | same grade. Horrors!
    |
    | Tests were not adjusted for any reason.
    |
    | Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected.
    |
    | The idea of parents bailing us out if we got in trouble in school or broke a law was unheard of.
    | They actually sided with the school or the law. Imagine that!
    |
    | This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers, and inventors, ever.
    |
    | We had freedom, failure, success, and responsibility --- and we learned how to deal with it. And
    | you're one of them!
    |
    | Congratulations.
    |
    | --
    | -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  3. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >According to today's American regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 30's,
    >40's, 50's, 60's, 70's or even the early 80's, probably shouldn't have survived.

    Some didn't...
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  4. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > According to today's American regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 30's,
    > 40's, 50's, 60's, 70's or even the early 80's,
    probably
    > shouldn't have survived.

    Some of us have even been around long enough to see this is the 3rd time or so this chainmail has
    been posted to a.m-b? ;)
     
  5. BB says:

    <snip>

    >Some students weren't as smart as others, so they failed a grade and were held back to repeat the
    >same grade. Horrors!

    <snip>

    And the English have just decided that the "F" grade for failure in an exam is too harsh, and it has
    been replaced by "N" for "Nearly".

    You couldn't make this stuff up...

    Steve
     
  6. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Greg P." <[email protected]> top-posted in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Awesome post dude. I totally agree. {rest and original below snipped}

    I don't think Blaine is claiming authorship, as this was an e-mail that's been around at
    least a year.

    Bill "born in the Free 50's" S.
     
  7. Gman

    Gman Guest

    On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 01:53:54 GMT, (Pete Cresswell) <[email protected]> wrote:
    > RE/
    >>According to today's American regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 30's,
    >>40's, 50's, 60's, 70's or even the early 80's, probably shouldn't have survived.
    >
    > Some didn't...
    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell

    That's what my wife (a nurse) reminds me of whenever the grandparents get on this kind of rant.

    Why do we wear helmets? I raced BMX as a kid and almost never practiced with a helmet...oh yeah, and
    my buddy was air-lifted to Phoenix after a bad crash without a helmet...but we survived! :)

    G
     
  8. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 22:20:30 -0400, John Harlow wrote:

    > Some of us have even been around long enough to see this is the 3rd time or so this chainmail has
    > been posted to a.m-b? ;)

    I've been in this NG (and r.b.o prior to moderation) since 1995. You?

    Try a Google search of a.m-b for some of the phrases used in this "chain mail". You won't find them.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  9. Michael Paul

    Michael Paul Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > According to today's American regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 30's,
    > 40's, 50's, 60's, 70's or even the early 80's,
    probably
    > shouldn't have survived.
    >
    > Our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paint.
    >
    > We had no childproof lids or locks on medicine bottles, doors, or cabinets, and when we rode our
    > bikes, we had no helmets.
    >
    > Not to mention the risks we took hitchhiking ...
    >
    > As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pickup
    > truck on a warm day was always a special treat.
    >
    > We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle. Horrors!
    >
    > We ate cupcakes, bread and butter, and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we were never
    > overweight because we were always outside playing.
    >
    > We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle, and no one actually died from this.
    >
    > We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then rode down the hill, only to find
    > out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the
    > problem.
    >
    > We would leave home in the morning and play all day , as long as we were back when the street
    > lights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. No cell phones. Unthinkable!
    >
    > We did not have Play stations, Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on
    > cable, video tape movies, surround sound, personal cell phones, personal computers, or Internet
    > chat rooms.
    >
    > We had friends! We went outside and found them.
    >
    > We played dodge ball, and sometimes, the ball would really hurt. We fell out of trees, got cut and
    > broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. They were accidents. No
    > one was to blame but us. Remember accidents?
    >
    > We had fights and punched each other and got black and blue and learned to get over it.
    >
    > We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen, we did
    > not put out any eyes.
    >
    > We rode bikes or walked to a friend's home and knocked on the door, or rang the bell or just
    > walked in and talked to them.
    >
    > Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal
    > with disappointment.
    >
    > Some students weren't as smart as others, so they failed a grade and were held back to repeat the
    > same grade. Horrors!
    >
    > Tests were not adjusted for any reason.
    >
    > Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected.
    >
    > The idea of parents bailing us out if we got in trouble in school or broke a law was unheard of.
    > They actually sided with the school or the law. Imagine that!
    >
    > This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers, and inventors, ever.
    >
    > We had freedom, failure, success, and responsibility --- and we learned how to deal with it. And
    > you're one of them!
    >
    > Congratulations.
    >
    > --
    > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)

    As a proud new daddy, I'm absolutely amazed that any of us have lived this long. Everything I read
    now about what's good and bad for a baby or child while good for the child seems to be about 180
    degrees from what I experienced as a kid.
     
  10. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > > Some of us have even been around long enough to see this is the 3rd time
    or
    > > so this chainmail has been posted to a.m-b? ;)
    >
    > I've been in this NG (and r.b.o prior to moderation) since 1995. You?
    >
    > Try a Google search of a.m-b for some of the phrases used in this "chain mail". You won't
    > find them.

    It wasn't too hard.

    http://tinyurl.com/onaf

    It was only 3 months ago. Your memory is getting as bad as mine! ;)

    I thought Shawny posted this last year too, but I can't find it.
     
  11. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Stephen Baker wrote:

    > And the English have just decided that the "F" grade for failure in an exam is too harsh, and it
    > has been replaced by "N" for "Nearly".

    "Just"? They had 'N' and 'U' (for unclassified) when I did my A-levels all those years ago...
     
  12. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 12:03:58 -0400, John Harlow wrote:

    >> Try a Google search of a.m-b for some of the phrases used in this "chain mail". You won't
    >> find them.
    >
    > It wasn't too hard.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/onaf

    I see, this was was fairly close, but different enough that the searches I used all failed. I picked
    phrases that wouldn't show up much on a.m-b, like "dodge ball" and "little league".

    My bad; I was out of the country when that last thread was running.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  13. The Ogre

    The Ogre Guest

    [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > BB says:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > >Some students weren't as smart as others, so they failed a grade and were held back to repeat the
    > >same grade. Horrors!
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > And the English have just decided that the "F" grade for failure in an exam is too harsh, and it
    > has been replaced by "N" for "Nearly".

    From the ?good? ole' USA where they still have F's, they just don't give them out because it
    demoralizes the kids.

    -- The Ogre
     
  14. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Stephen Baker wrote:

    >>"Just"? They had 'N' and 'U' (for unclassified) when I did my A-levels all those years ago...
    >
    >
    > Holy Cr$p, I've been away too long.......
    >
    > It was in the Daily Telegraph last week as though it was a new thing. Maybe it was for the 11-yr
    > old tests they all seem to have to do now.

    Possibly. I think they still have 'F' for GCSE (old O-Levels), but N and U have been around A-Levels
    for about the last ten years or so.

    > Steve "getting more American by the day...."

    My thoughts are with you...
     
  15. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Stephen Baker wrote:
    >
    > >>"Just"? They had 'N' and 'U' (for unclassified) when I did my A-levels all those years ago...
    > >
    > >
    > > Holy Cr$p, I've been away too long.......
    > >
    > > It was in the Daily Telegraph last week as though it was a new thing.
    Maybe it
    > > was for the 11-yr old tests they all seem to have to do now.
    >
    > Possibly. I think they still have 'F' for GCSE (old O-Levels), but N and U have been around
    > A-Levels for about the last ten years or so.
    >
    > > Steve "getting more American by the day...."
    >
    > My thoughts are with you...

    Poor sod - first "getting more American by the day...." than that........

    Shaun aRe
     
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