Slipped disc runners please contact me - need help!

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Lawrence Bestow, Feb 1, 2004.

  1. My daughter is a keen runner, but has a slipped disc and has been unable to run for months.

    She would love to hear from anyone who has had a similar problem, to share experiences and hopefully
    get back on track!

    Many thanks.
     
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  2. Gentolm

    Gentolm Guest

    friend of mine had same prob . she went to a chiro plodzilla

    Lawrence Bestow wrote:
    >
    > My daughter is a keen runner, but has a slipped disc and has been unable to run for months.
    >
    > She would love to hear from anyone who has had a similar problem, to share experiences and
    > hopefully get back on track!
    >
    > Many thanks.
     
  3. On 1 Feb 2004 12:45:20 -0800, [email protected] (Lawrence
    Bestow) wrote:

    >My daughter is a keen runner, but has a slipped disc and has been unable to run for months.
    >
    >She would love to hear from anyone who has had a similar problem, to share experiences and
    >hopefully get back on track!

    I am not a doctor, so take this with all the appropriate disclaimers.

    Suffered a back injury a little over four years ago, initial diagnosis was ruptured disc, and it may
    have been that, but it later turned out that there was also a dislocated SI-joint. Before the injury
    I was what you could characterize as a casual athlete - besides running (up to ~8 miles runs), I
    played soccer and squash. The next four years I saw a number of doctors, specialists, and physical
    therapists. I had several attempts at getting back to my previous level of exercise. Everytime
    causing my back problems to reappear, typically after a couple of weeks to a month of exercise. My
    last attempt has been much better, but still not without problems. I have made it through 5 months,
    to about ~30 miles/week. The most important advice I can offer, based on my own personal experience,
    is starting very slow. The main difference between this time and the previous was starting extremely
    slow. The first two months I never made even at attempt at running more than 3 or 3.5 miles.
    Obviously, that becomes very easy very fast, even after four years of inactivity in terms of
    exercise, but it seems to have payed off. Another piece of advice I can offer is to work closely
    with the physical therapist and/or the doctor. I also think I benefitted from a lot of targeted
    stretches and exercises to strengthen abdomen and lower back. The strength helps stabilize the back
    and body, important if you have back problems. On advice from my physical therapists, I have stayed
    away from workouts that involves compression or twists of the back. I have focused on exercises that
    are symmetrical.

    Finally, stationary bikes can be a good supplement to the running in the initial phases. My
    experience is that the type where you sit upright with your legs in front of you is the least strain
    on the back. It is low-impact exercise that may also help getting started on an exercise regimen
    again. When it comes to running, treadmills is a better option than running on paved roads or bike
    paths. Again, the issue it impact.

    Again, this is entirely based on personal experience, and should in no way be construed as
    professional medical advice. Your daughter should really consult with her doctor and physical
    therapist, who know her specific case.

    Best of luck to her.

    Tom

    --
    A society that will trade a little liberty for a little order will lose both, and deserve neither -
    Thomas Jefferson
     
  4. Miss-G-

    Miss-G- Guest

  5. Gentolm

    Gentolm Guest

    have you tried a chiro for the si injury i hurt mine by lifting 150-200 pound stump my chiro put me
    back afer 3 months of manipulation plodzilla

    "T. Liljeberg" wrote:
    >
    > On 1 Feb 2004 12:45:20 -0800, [email protected] (Lawrence Bestow) wrote:
    >
    > >My daughter is a keen runner, but has a slipped disc and has been unable to run for months.
    > >
    > >She would love to hear from anyone who has had a similar problem, to share experiences and
    > >hopefully get back on track!
    >
    > I am not a doctor, so take this with all the appropriate disclaimers.
    >
    > Suffered a back injury a little over four years ago, initial diagnosis was ruptured disc, and it
    > may have been that, but it later turned out that there was also a dislocated SI-joint. Before the
    > injury I was what you could characterize as a casual athlete - besides running (up to ~8 miles
    > runs), I played soccer and squash. The next four years I saw a number of doctors, specialists, and
    > physical therapists. I had several attempts at getting back to my previous level of exercise.
    > Everytime causing my back problems to reappear, typically after a couple of weeks to a month of
    > exercise. My last attempt has been much better, but still not without problems. I have made it
    > through 5 months, to about ~30 miles/week. The most important advice I can offer, based on my own
    > personal experience, is starting very slow. The main difference between this time and the previous
    > was starting extremely slow. The first two months I never made even at attempt at running more
    > than 3 or 3.5 miles. Obviously, that becomes very easy very fast, even after four years of
    > inactivity in terms of exercise, but it seems to have payed off. Another piece of advice I can
    > offer is to work closely with the physical therapist and/or the doctor. I also think I benefitted
    > from a lot of targeted stretches and exercises to strengthen abdomen and lower back. The strength
    > helps stabilize the back and body, important if you have back problems. On advice from my physical
    > therapists, I have stayed away from workouts that involves compression or twists of the back. I
    > have focused on exercises that are symmetrical.
    >
    > Finally, stationary bikes can be a good supplement to the running in the initial phases. My
    > experience is that the type where you sit upright with your legs in front of you is the least
    > strain on the back. It is low-impact exercise that may also help getting started on an exercise
    > regimen again. When it comes to running, treadmills is a better option than running on paved roads
    > or bike paths. Again, the issue it impact.
    >
    > Again, this is entirely based on personal experience, and should in no way be construed as
    > professional medical advice. Your daughter should really consult with her doctor and physical
    > therapist, who know her specific case.
    >
    > Best of luck to her.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    > --
    > A society that will trade a little liberty for a little order will lose both, and deserve neither
    > - Thomas Jefferson
     
  6. Tom

    Many thanks - my daughter read your message with interest and sent you an email, but it
    bounced back.
     
  7. On 3 Feb 2004 01:01:30 -0800, [email protected] (Lawrence
    Bestow) wrote:

    >Tom
    >
    >Many thanks - my daughter read your message with interest and sent you an email, but it
    >bounced back.

    I munged my e-mail address to avoid spam and virus. The correct address is: [email protected]

    Tom

    --
    Faber quisque fortunae suae.
    - Appius Claudius
     
  8. Martin

    Martin Guest

    [email protected] (Lawrence Bestow) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > My daughter is a keen runner, but has a slipped disc and has been unable to run for months.
    >
    > She would love to hear from anyone who has had a similar problem, to share experiences and
    > hopefully get back on track!
    >
    > Many thanks.

    I began active running again abt. 3 months ago after 2 years of casual running. And allthough I have
    been very good I started out too ambitious. It gave me sheen splint pains. Your daughter must
    understand that each foot-strike delivers a shockwave that travels up the leg. This energy must be
    absorbed by the musculoskeletal system. The harder the running surface the greater the shockwave. So
    as a follow-up on Tom´s posting I strongly advice your daughter to primarily run on soft ground, no
    asphalt. Cross-training is also good as it´s just as hard training as long distance on asphalt, and
    the shockwaves are not as damaging. Another alternative is to run in knee-deep water. Finally I
    would check the shoes. As running is a rather cheap sport (no expensive club fees), don´t save on
    the shoes. After 600 miles - get new ones, and NOT from the hypermarket, but a specialist store that
    can monitor your running and recommend appropriate shoes. And keep a _runners log_. It´s comforting
    to follow your progress.

    B/R Martin
     
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