Slow in the flats

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Versabar, Mar 19, 2006.

  1. Versabar

    Versabar New Member

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    What is the best way to get faster in flat sections. I am able to do really well climbing hills with the guys I ride with. But for some reason guys I pass going up hills drop me in the flat sections. Usually the guys who blow by me are bigger than I am. I am 44 y.o. and 6' 190 lb.

    I have a cyclops and the video seemed to help me, but I hate riding inside.

    Also, is it better to do one day of riding / training and one full day off?

    Thanks
     
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  2. ToffoIsMe

    ToffoIsMe New Member

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    You pass people going up hills, when you're 190 pounds? You must have a lot of power...
     
  3. roger89

    roger89 New Member

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  4. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Well, he did say the other guys (that drop him on the flats) were bigger still. Maybe this is an endurance workout for a football or rugby team... :p
     
  5. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    On the hills, it's power vs. weight that determines performance. On the flats it's power vs. aerodynamic drag. The easiest way to improve your performance on the flats would be to practice riding in a lower body position, such as using the 'drops' on the handlebars. Also, when you're riding in a group you can practice your skill drafting behind the other riders. Get comfortable riding really close behind their wheel, and practice finding the spot where the wind noise decreases if there's a cross-wind. Also, when you find yourself at the front of the paceline, make sure you pull off before your completely blown so you have enough energy left to get back on the back of the group and hold on until you recover.

    That really depends on how much and what type of riding you're doing. Most people should be able to do moderate rides of 1-2 hours on back to back days without a loss of performance, but that's mostly personal preference.
     
  6. Versabar

    Versabar New Member

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    Roger 89, read your thread. Will follow your advice. I do need to get in the drops more, and I gues, just get busy spinning.

    It just does not come as easy as climbing for me.

    For the rest of you guys who are cracking on me for my weight, I had a good laugh. We are not the 110 lb soaking wet types.

    I am trying to get in shape, and lose a couple. I am sure that would help more than anything else.

    The guys I ride with are mostly tri-athlon types in their mid forties. The are some guys in their 20's and 30's, but for the most part just old bastards like me.
     
  7. Spunout

    Spunout New Member

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    Train more on the flats. You probably train on the hills a lot because you're good at it.
     
  8. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Agree with frenchyge that reducing your aero drag is the quickest way to pick up speed on the flats. Learn to get into a comfortable position on the drops, with your elbows, knees and head tucked in. You don't need to get your chin down on your stem, but just try to make yourself look small on the bike.

    That, along with some advanced wheel sucking skills, should enable you to stay with a lot of the younger guys on the flats. As a fellow OB, I've found they don't mind, as long as I try to take my pulls at the front. Key thing is not to sprint over them at the finish....that's loads of fun, but just plain impolite:)
     
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