Slow leak--arrrrrgh!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Luigi de Guzman, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. So my front tire went flat again, due to a slow leak

    I had thought that I'd fixed the puncture in question, but, no, a
    corner of the patch hadn't stuck onto the tube properly, so was
    causing a slow leak.

    I'm just annoyed as all hell, because now since it's *badly* patched,
    the leak is irreparable--the bits of the patch that I stuck on
    CORRECTLY went on when they were supposed to, and can't be torn free
    from the tube for love or money.


    Ugh. You live, you learn.

    -Luigi
     
    Tags:


  2. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 23:17:03 -0400, Luigi de Guzman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So my front tire went flat again, due to a slow leak
    >
    >I had thought that I'd fixed the puncture in question, but, no, a
    >corner of the patch hadn't stuck onto the tube properly, so was
    >causing a slow leak.
    >
    >I'm just annoyed as all hell, because now since it's *badly* patched,
    >the leak is irreparable--the bits of the patch that I stuck on
    >CORRECTLY went on when they were supposed to, and can't be torn free
    >from the tube for love or money.
    >
    >
    >Ugh. You live, you learn.
    >
    >-Luigi


    Hi, I see these posts often and I don't understand why some people
    have problems. I patched a tube today and in its place installed
    another patched tube.

    I know it has been described before, by those with more experience
    than I, but Here is how I do it. I sand an area much larger than the
    size of the patch. The same with the glue, I always cover a larger
    area. Today, because I was home and could wash up, I used my finger to
    spread the glue evenly. I wait until the glue is dry and apply the
    patch. I try to use a flat surface, where I can press the patch down
    evenly, with decent pressure. I press and hold it tight for probably
    30-60 seconds. Done!

    I have been using the Park Tool patches because that is what my LBS
    carries, although today I used the kit that came with my NashbarBig
    Tool Kit 2.

    Why do you think your patch didn't hold?

    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  3. bentbrian

    bentbrian New Member

    Joined:
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    Carry a spare tube. It is cheap insurance. If you mess up patching one you still have a spare. I've had problems of developing slow leaks in the tubes on my old Trek road bike (aluminum rims and presta valves). The leak starts where the valve stem passes through the rim. I've de-burred the rim holes. The only fix I've been able to come up with is cutting a hole in a patch and placing the patch over the valve stem before I put the stem through the hole in the rim. I leave the outside lock nut on the valve stem loose. So far no more problems. The rims on my 'bent are slightly different (still aluminum rims and presta valves), the valve stem hole is nicely machined and the valve stem fits like a glove. I've also had the presta valves leak a little even when the valve mechanism locking nut is tightened down (so far not on the 'bent though).

    'bent Brian
     
  4. On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 23:19:23 -0500, Jeff Starr <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Why do you think your patch didn't hold?


    Didn't sand a large enough area of the tube. That's easily seen.

    Yes, I know. I'm an idiot.

    -Luigi
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 21 Jul 2004 23:17:03 -0400,
    <[email protected]>, Luigi de Guzman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm just annoyed as all hell, because now since it's *badly* patched,
    >the leak is irreparable--the bits of the patch that I stuck on
    >CORRECTLY went on when they were supposed to, and can't be torn free
    >from the tube for love or money.
    >
    >
    >Ugh. You live, you learn.


    In a recent protracted thread about patches, Jobst Brandt divulged
    that patches can be removed with heat. I tried it on trashed tube and
    it works a treat.
    So, for love, your mom will let you use her iron. For money you can
    buy your own at the thrift store.
    A fairly hot setting will soften the glue sufficiently to remove the
    patch easily.
    --
    zk
     
  6. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 23:32:44 -0700, Zoot Katz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Wed, 21 Jul 2004 23:17:03 -0400,
    ><[email protected]>, Luigi de Guzman
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I'm just annoyed as all hell, because now since it's *badly* patched,
    >>the leak is irreparable--the bits of the patch that I stuck on
    >>CORRECTLY went on when they were supposed to, and can't be torn free
    >>from the tube for love or money.
    >>
    >>
    >>Ugh. You live, you learn.

    >
    >In a recent protracted thread about patches, Jobst Brandt divulged
    >that patches can be removed with heat. I tried it on trashed tube and
    >it works a treat.
    >So, for love, your mom will let you use her iron. For money you can
    >buy your own at the thrift store.
    >A fairly hot setting will soften the glue sufficiently to remove the
    >patch easily.


    How about heat gun or hair dryer?

    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  7. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    >>Why do you think your patch didn't hold?
    >
    >Didn't sand a large enough area of the tube. That's easily seen.
    >
    >Yes, I know. I'm an idiot.
    >
    >-Luigi


    A friend of mine told me that the reason you sand the tube is to remove a
    powdery chemical residue from the tube. He claims that when tubes are made,
    the chemical is put in the mold to allow the tubes to be removed easily. The
    problem is that the glue for patches will not work on the residue. The residue
    has to be removed first and that is done by sanding. I understand that you can
    also remove it by using a little acetone. I have tried it and it seem to work
    great. Of course, I still sand the tube just in case. Nothing like having a
    backup.
     
  8. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 22 Jul 2004 08:09:47 -0500,
    <[email protected]>, Jeff Starr
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>A fairly hot setting will soften the glue sufficiently to remove the
    >>patch easily.

    >
    >How about heat gun or hair dryer?


    How about you tell us?

    I used a 165 watt heat sealing iron.

    Lacking anything more sophisticated, I'd try an incandescent bulb.
    --
    zk
     
  9. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 09:30:37 -0700, Zoot Katz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Thu, 22 Jul 2004 08:09:47 -0500,
    ><[email protected]>, Jeff Starr
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>>A fairly hot setting will soften the glue sufficiently to remove the
    >>>patch easily.

    >>
    >>How about heat gun or hair dryer?

    >
    >How about you tell us?


    If I knew, why would I ask the question? I thought that you might
    know how much heat, it actually took.
    >
    >I used a 165 watt heat sealing iron.
    >
    >Lacking anything more sophisticated, I'd try an incandescent bulb.


    Wel, if you think a light bulb would work, then my guess is that a
    heat gun would do just fine.

    Life is Good!
    Jeff

    l
     
  10. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 22 Jul 2004 13:49:48 -0500,
    <[email protected]>, Jeff Starr
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>>How about heat gun or hair dryer?

    >>
    >>How about you tell us?

    >
    >If I knew, why would I ask the question? I thought that you might
    >know how much heat, it actually took.
    >>

    Uncomfortably hot to the touch.

    >>I used a 165 watt heat sealing iron.
    >>
    >>Lacking anything more sophisticated, I'd try an incandescent bulb.

    >
    >Wel, if you think a light bulb would work, then my guess is that a
    >heat gun would do just fine.


    I have neither a heat gun or hair dryer. If you do, try it.

    I just tried a 75 watt light bulb. It did the job.
    --
    zk
     
  11. SoCalMike

    SoCalMike Guest


    > A friend of mine told me that the reason you sand the tube is to remove a
    > powdery chemical residue from the tube.



    talc... talcum powder... baby powder. so the tube doesnt stick to itself
    in storage.
     
  12. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Pbwalther wrote:

    >>>Why do you think your patch didn't hold?
    >>>

    >>Didn't sand a large enough area of the tube. That's easily seen.
    >>
    >>Yes, I know. I'm an idiot.
    >>
    >>-Luigi
    >>

    >
    >A friend of mine told me that the reason you sand the tube is to remove a
    >powdery chemical residue from the tube. He claims that when tubes are made,
    >the chemical is put in the mold to allow the tubes to be removed easily. The
    >problem is that the glue for patches will not work on the residue. The residue
    >has to be removed first and that is done by sanding. I understand that you can
    >also remove it by using a little acetone. I have tried it and it seem to work
    >great. Of course, I still sand the tube just in case. Nothing like having a
    >backup.
    >

    your explanation works for me. I useta work in the fibreglass industry.
    We would treat moulds with a very thin spray of stuff that let the
    product pop away from the mould when encouraged by a shot of compressed air.
    Makes sense to me. The rubber doesn't need to be roughened. It needs
    to be chemically clean, so the glue can bond with the rubber with no
    interference from the relaeasing compound, whatever it is.
    Bernie
     
  13. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Jeff Starr" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I patched a tube today and in its place installed
    > another patched tube.
    >
    > ...I sand an area much larger than the
    > size of the patch. The same with the glue, I always cover a larger
    > area.


    Added tip: with a pen, mark around the hole at some distance from it, like
    this, where "*" is the hole:


    |

    - * -

    |

    (looks best in fixed font)

    This way, after you sand and glue a generous area like Jeff suggests, you
    can still get an accurate visual read on where the hole is and you can be
    sure to put the middle of the patch right over the hole.
     
  14. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I just tried a 75 watt light bulb. It did the job.


    Zoot! Never use a 75 watt bulb where a blowtorch could do the job with more
    style!
    Has Fabrizio taught you nothing?
     
  15. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 14:32:12 +1000, bentbrian
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Carry a spare tube. It is cheap insurance. If you mess up patching one
    >you still have a spare.


    Or, the much ballyhooed, and really quite good, strategy of using
    the spare tube for the first flat on the road, carrying the patch
    kit only for a second flat in a single ride; then, patch the tubes
    in bulk.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
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