Slow roadies

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Tamyka Bell, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. gplama

    gplama Well-Known Member

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    arh.. real racing... see its the 'team' thing I dont get.. there is no 'I' in team!.. :)


    cheers,
    GPL
    :much to learn:
     


  2. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    sinus wrote:
    >
    > Tamyka Bell Wrote:
    > > (1) Not to be confused with commuters, who ride their bikes to work,
    > > etc. Rather "commuter-types" are the ones who think their daily commute
    > > is some big important race and take all sorts of stupid risks to prove
    > > how good they are. Pretty similar to "roadie types" actually, but
    > > encompasses all types of bikes.

    > It sounds more like car driver types, to me. Stupid risks, at our
    > expense, to get to the red light 0.025 seconds faster.
    >
    > --
    > sinus


    Fair call.

    T
     
  3. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    531Aussie wrote:
    >
    > gplama Wrote:
    > > I'd even chase down my nana if she rode a bike... and she was on the
    > > same team.. and in the breakaway.. I also suffer from this silly disease :p

    >
    > Yesterday was meant to be a rest day after a tough 95km on Tuesday and
    > a moderate 90km on Sundee, so my intention was to just roll around
    > Beach Rd, working on my tan. :D
    >
    > With the headwind, I hitched a ride with a small group that wasn't
    > going too fast, but a few kms later, one of the guys cranked it up a
    > bit. There was no way I could let these guys think I was getting
    > dropped, so I sat at the back with my HR at about 75%, which obviously
    > ain't that hard, but not so good for really sore legs. :)
    >
    > Then the group of 7 started to drop off one by one, so there I was,
    > grinding along behind this one guy all the way up to Luna Park.:p So
    > much for my 'easy day': I ended up doing 100km, about a third of which
    > at ~75% max hr. Now my legs feel worse than yesterday. D'OH!!! :)
    >
    > --
    > 531Aussie


    No sympathy.

    Who cares if they think they dropped you? Good for them? They'd probably
    only brag about it on aus.bicycle anyway.

    Tam *proud of staying under 25km/h and resisting the urge to go fast*
     
  4. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    531Aussie wrote:
    >
    > gplama Wrote:
    > > heh, nice work!... though you better keep those stories in the closet or
    > > you'll be beaten up by 'those who cant hold on' around these parts! ;) I was so stooopid yesterday that now I can't race tonight coz me legs

    > are killing me!! :p
    >
    > --
    > 531Aussie


    Oh you're missing out on your race? Okay, a little bit of sympathy now.

    T
     
  5. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Tamyka Bell wrote:

    > No sympathy.


    Harsh!

    > Who cares if they think they dropped you? Good for them? They'd probably
    > only brag about it on aus.bicycle anyway.


    Herein lies one of the problems with using bunch rides for training -
    all too often they end up doing the wrong thing for your training.

    > Tam *proud of staying under 25km/h and resisting the urge to go fast*


    But <25km/h?! that's sub-recovery HR (unless it's into a howling
    headwind up a hill!) In all seriousness, what was your HR when you were
    doing this ride?
     
  6. Bikesoiler

    Bikesoiler New Member

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    A St Kilda Rd regular here at work claims by holding the right pace (ie quick) you can get in sequence with the traffic lights.
     
  7. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Bleve wrote:
    >
    > Tamyka Bell wrote:

    <snip>
    > > Tam *proud of staying under 25km/h and resisting the urge to go fast*

    >
    > But <25km/h?! that's sub-recovery HR (unless it's into a howling
    > headwind up a hill!) In all seriousness, what was your HR when you were
    > doing this ride?


    I don't wear a HR monitor. They chafe over 7 hours or more. So I've
    gotten used to judging HR zones but I don't actually know what my HR
    was. The ride intensity was more of a casual stroll along the beach at
    sunset...

    I'm not in recovery mode... I'm in rest mode. The point of today's ride
    was to get a bit of blood flow into my legs and to suss out any sore
    spots that aren't evident when I walk. I found a slight niggle in my
    left knee and at the top of my right calf, but nothing I'll worry about
    - I think both are actually related to tight hips.

    But... Over that particular ride, I'd normally only average about 29-30
    km/h anyway (there are a few hills, not too many, just rollers). I'm
    not a fast cyclist, dude. To put it in perspective, I TT'd over the
    flat part of the course before Cairns Half Ironman at the end of August
    04 and was thrilled I managed 30km/h. Back then my average speed over a
    ride was never over 27km/h, and any day over 25km/h was a happy one.

    T
     
  8. OzCableguy

    OzCableguy Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > So by EASY I mean I averaged 23.8 km/h on an almost-flat course.


    Incidentally what would a 23.8 kmh average represent on a 26" wheeled
    hybrid? Fast, slow or average?
     
  9. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    OzCableguy wrote:
    >
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > So by EASY I mean I averaged 23.8 km/h on an almost-flat course.

    >
    > Incidentally what would a 23.8 kmh average represent on a 26" wheeled
    > hybrid? Fast, slow or average?


    I'll refer this one to the experts... *looks around desperately at
    audience for someone to raise hand*...

    I'd be guessing average, but really, it depends, I have seen some people
    riding hybrids at 10km/h (and wondered how they go straight at that
    speed) and others pass me...

    Tam
     
  10. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    OzCableguy wrote:
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > So by EASY I mean I averaged 23.8 km/h on an almost-flat course.

    >
    > Incidentally what would a 23.8 kmh average represent on a 26" wheeled
    > hybrid? Fast, slow or average?


    On slick, high pressure tyres it'd be pretty slow, but it depends on
    how you're calculating your average. If it's rolling time, It's slow,
    but if it's including stops, then all bets are off.

    I'd expect a moderatly fit adult cyclist on just about anything with
    slick tyres to be able to cruise at 25-30km/h on the flat in still air,
    but averages can be deceptive. There's quite a difference between 25 &
    30km/h, especially on a hybrid where you're not exactly in a position
    to slip through the wind. On most classes of bike, anything over
    30km/h I'd consider reasonably fast in still air on flat ground, for a
    cruising (e1) speed. By cruising I mean the sort of pace you can
    comfortably ride at all day, assuming you can ride all day :) At least
    for an hour or two anyway ....
     
  11. OzCableguy

    OzCableguy Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'd be guessing average, but really, it depends, I have seen some people
    > riding hybrids at 10km/h (and wondered how they go straight at that
    > speed) and others pass me...


    Interesting. Yes, just wondering how much of a difference between a good
    road bike and good hybrid with all else being equal. I tend to think it'd be
    much of a muchness until trying to maintain speeds over 25kmh or so where
    drag starts to become more of an issue.
     
  12. OzCableguy

    OzCableguy Guest

    "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'd expect a moderatly fit adult cyclist on just about anything with
    > slick tyres to be able to cruise at 25-30km/h on the flat in still air,


    Yep, I have no worries cruising at 30+ under those conditions but a bit of a
    headwind or long slow rise and I'm back down around 20.

    > but averages can be deceptive. There's quite a difference between 25 &
    > 30km/h, especially on a hybrid where you're not exactly in a position
    > to slip through the wind.


    I'm thinking this might be the key. Maintaining a speed above 25kmh for
    longer than a few kms seems to be a bit of an ask on the hybrid. Well, for
    me anyway and I do still have quite a way to go in the weight loss dept
    which would be the main factor at the moment. ;-)
     
  13. Jono L

    Jono L Well-Known Member

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    Yeh something like that...

    Forget Anaconda, Tim and Big Mat are devising team "Le Coq Rouge", only for hawthorn TDB riders. We must work as one to win that final sprint to le coq rouge!!!!
     
  14. Euan

    Euan Guest

    Bikesoiler <[email protected]> writes:

    > EuanB Wrote:
    >> Had a rare driver's eye view of the St Kilda Rd madness @ 17:00
    >> yesterday, highly amusing.
    >> <snip>
    >>

    >
    > A St Kilda Rd regular here at work claims by holding the right pace (ie
    > quick) you can get in sequence with the traffic lights.


    Quick down St Kilda Rd sounds vaguely like attempted suicide.

    Maybe I'm too cautious...
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  15. Euan

    Euan Guest

    531Aussie <[email protected]> writes:

    > With the headwind, I hitched a ride with a small group that wasn't
    > going too fast, but a few kms later, one of the guys cranked it up a
    > bit. There was no way I could let these guys think I was getting
    > dropped, so I sat at the back with my HR at about 75%, which obviously
    > ain't that hard, but not so good for really sore legs. :)


    Oh been there! As you know I'm not a roadie but I do ride quite hard
    and have to watch that I do recover or getting in to work is no fun at
    all.

    It took me a while to learn that an ad hoc group sharing the load in a
    head wind is *not* the easiest ride home! Don't know what it is and I'm
    just as guilty of this as anyone else but when it's your turn on the
    front you just can't help yourself: you just crank it up way more than
    you would on your own 'cause you don't want to look like a woose!

    If I'm on a recovery day I'll be that woose who gets dropped. My body
    thanks me for it :)
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  16. Euan

    Euan Guest

    "OzCableguy" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> I'd be guessing average, but really, it depends, I have seen some people
    >> riding hybrids at 10km/h (and wondered how they go straight at that
    >> speed) and others pass me...

    >
    > Interesting. Yes, just wondering how much of a difference between a good
    > road bike and good hybrid with all else being equal. I tend to think it'd be
    > much of a muchness until trying to maintain speeds over 25kmh or so where
    > drag starts to become more of an issue.


    No, not the case at all.

    My wife's recently scored a very nice (wish it fit me) road bike. With
    *much* less effort she can maintain a pace 5km/h greater than on her
    hybrid.

    I've had similar experiences on my MTB, every thing's just so much more
    work than it is on a roadie.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  17. On 2006-02-09, Euan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > My wife's recently scored a very nice (wish it fit me) road bike. With
    > *much* less effort she can maintain a pace 5km/h greater than on her
    > hybrid.
    >
    > I've had similar experiences on my MTB, every thing's just so much more
    > work than it is on a roadie.


    Sounds right to me. Now, when I jump on my hybrid, it seems like a lot
    more work than the road bike. I'm not sure why ... rolling resistance,
    perhaps. But in any case, for serious commuting, it's the road bike all
    the way for me.

    Must look at getting a reasonable frame and making up a single speed
    (probably not a fixie) for travel to and from the local railway station.
    It's not far, but there are times when it's nice to be able to jump on
    the bike and cycle there, lock the bike up, and head off, reasonably
    secure in the knowledge that even if the bike gets pinched, I'm not out
    much.

    --
    My Usenet From: address now expires after two weeks. If you email me, and
    the mail bounces, try changing the bit before the "@" to "usenet".
     
  18. Bruce Graham

    Bruce Graham Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > I'm thinking this might be the key. Maintaining a speed above 25kmh for
    > longer than a few kms seems to be a bit of an ask on the hybrid. Well, for
    > me anyway and I do still have quite a way to go in the weight loss dept
    > which would be the main factor at the moment. ;-)
    >

    lots of long slower rides will get rid of the weight so no need to go too
    hard. I only lose weight quickly when I go on a tour when I ride 4-8
    hours a day 5-6 days a week. Not much of that is hard riding and I eat
    like a pig the whole time.
     
  19. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 09/02/06 at 17:37:32 Jono L somehow managed to type:


    <snip>

    > sprint to le coq rouge!!!!

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Ooh, sounds painfull - can it be treated ???


    --
    Humbug
    BE A LOOF! (There has been a recent population explosion of lerts.)
     
  20. OzCableguy

    OzCableguy Guest

    "Stuart Lamble" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2006-02-09, Euan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> My wife's recently scored a very nice (wish it fit me) road bike. With
    >> *much* less effort she can maintain a pace 5km/h greater than on her
    >> hybrid.
    >>
    >> I've had similar experiences on my MTB, every thing's just so much more
    >> work than it is on a roadie.

    >
    > Sounds right to me. Now, when I jump on my hybrid, it seems like a lot
    > more work than the road bike. I'm not sure why ... rolling resistance,
    > perhaps. But in any case, for serious commuting, it's the road bike all
    > the way for me.


    Hmmm... now I want a road bike... ;-)
     
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