Slow-Speed Injuries Hurt Too

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by B. Sanders, Apr 24, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    I'm just going to say it: Mountain biking is dangerous. I hate falling; but it's usually not too
    bad. I just hop off the bike on sections that I'm not ready for (the ones that say "Danger!
    Extremely Technical Terrain!"). Eventually I'll learn them; but at my own pace. I've ridden every
    trail at least 5 or 6 times, but some of them were white-knuckle rides, and I biffed several times.
    Learning to fall is part of this sport, isn't it?

    I've been trying to get my wife to ride some of the technical MTB trails for years. Last year, she
    finally went with me. The trails had more whoop-de-doo's cut into them than in previous years, and
    were much more difficult than I remembered. She did OK, but was petrified and not having any fun at
    all. We were in a pretty easy flat, winding singletrack section in a wooded area and she biffed on a
    root. She fell hard and hit her head (with helmet on, thank goodness). The fall twisted her neck,
    apparently. This happened at about a walking pace; but she was in pain for a week! She thought she
    had a concussion from it. I was worried. There was a little bit of trail rash; but nothing bad.
    Again, this happened on a flat trail at a walking pace.

    I'm Mr. Safety Conscious, and this kinda shook me up. I really didn't expect this. We had dismounted
    and walked all of the trails that were too hard for her - just to make sure that she didn't feel
    intimidated. She has sworn never to return to the trails. That's it - once out, and she's done. I
    can't really blame her. She could give a damn about MTB'ing in the first place (but loves road
    riding). I tried my best to make sure that her bike, clothing, pedals, shoes, etc were trail-worthy
    (they were fine).

    I wish I had more time to ride trails, so I could get used to them. There are still quite a few
    sections that I won't ride (washed-out, deeply rutted babyhead creek crossings; cliff-edge
    singletrack that is eroded to nothing, etc) Hard core riders think I'm a wimp. I don't care. I have
    insurance; but don't feel like bleeding for my sport. I respect the more skilled riders. I just wish
    they'd respect me for choosing not to be reckless.

    -Barry
     
    Tags:


  2. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    B. Sanders wrote:
    >
    > I wish I had more time to ride trails, so I could get used to them. There are still quite a few
    > sections that I won't ride (washed-out, deeply rutted babyhead creek crossings; cliff-edge
    > singletrack that is eroded to nothing, etc) Hard core riders think I'm a wimp. I don't care. I
    > have insurance; but don't feel like bleeding for my sport. I respect the more skilled riders. I
    > just wish they'd respect me for choosing not to be reckless.
    >
    > -Barry

    In all seriousness, riders do what: call you names, point and laugh? One of the beauties of this
    sport is that there isn't a "right" level of difficulty, it's whatever feels appropriate for you.
    Granted as I've ridden more, I WANT to try harder stuff but if I choose to ride doubletrack for the
    rest of my life, it's no body's business but my own.

    Penny

    p.s. sorry about the wife.
     
  3. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > B. Sanders wrote:
    > >
    > > I wish I had more time to ride trails, so I could get used to them. There are still quite a few
    > > sections that I won't ride (washed-out, deeply rutted babyhead creek crossings; cliff-edge
    > > singletrack that is eroded to nothing, etc) Hard core riders think I'm a wimp. I don't care. I
    > > have insurance; but don't feel like bleeding for my sport. I respect the more skilled riders. I
    > > just wish they'd respect me for choosing not to be reckless.
    > >
    > > -Barry
    >
    > In all seriousness, riders do what: call you names, point and laugh?

    Something like that.

    > One of the beauties of this sport is that there isn't a "right" level of difficulty, it's whatever
    > feels appropriate for you.

    For guys it may be a little different. I feel a great deal of pressure to "go for it" when I'm with
    groups of testosterone-pumped males on the trails. That's why I avoid those situations almost
    completely and try to ride solo as much as possible (even though it's less safe).

    > Granted as I've ridden more, I WANT to try harder stuff but if I choose to ride doubletrack for
    the
    > rest of my life, it's no body's business but my own.

    Again, in an ideal world, perhaps. That's *exactly* what I mean about respect: The male riders I
    know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about how extreme they are, and
    haven't a shred of respect for anybody who shys away from the most difficult trails. It's none of
    their business; but they make it their business. Maybe it's different for women. I hope so.

    Thanks for the reply, Penny. I appreciate your respectful attitude, and wish I could meet people
    like you on the trails.

    -Barry

    PS: My wife still rides with me on the easy singletrack - just not on technical trails.
     
  4. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    B. Sanders wrote:
    > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> B. Sanders wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I wish I had more time to ride trails, so I could get used to them. There are still quite a few
    >>> sections that I won't ride (washed-out, deeply rutted babyhead creek crossings; cliff-edge
    >>> singletrack that is eroded to nothing, etc) Hard core riders think I'm a wimp. I don't care. I
    >>> have insurance; but don't feel like bleeding for my sport. I respect the more skilled riders. I
    >>> just wish they'd respect me for choosing not to be reckless.
    >>>
    >>> -Barry
    >>
    >> In all seriousness, riders do what: call you names, point and laugh?
    >
    > Something like that.
    >
    >> One of the beauties of this sport is that there isn't a "right" level of difficulty, it's
    >> whatever feels appropriate for you.
    >
    > For guys it may be a little different. I feel a great deal of pressure to "go for it" when I'm
    > with groups of testosterone-pumped males on the trails. That's why I avoid those situations almost
    > completely and try to ride solo as much as possible (even though it's less safe).
    >
    >> Granted as I've ridden more, I WANT to try harder stuff but if I choose to ride doubletrack for
    >> the rest of my life, it's no body's business but my own.
    >
    > Again, in an ideal world, perhaps. That's *exactly* what I mean about respect: The male riders I
    > know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about how extreme they are,
    > and haven't a shred of respect for anybody who shys away from the most difficult trails. It's none
    > of their business; but they make it their business. Maybe it's different for women. I hope so.
    >
    > Thanks for the reply, Penny. I appreciate your respectful attitude, and wish I could meet people
    > like you on the trails.
    >
    > -Barry
    >
    > PS: My wife still rides with me on the easy singletrack - just not on technical trails.

    harumpph, sounds like you need new riding pals.

    penny
     
  5. Gary In Va

    Gary In Va Guest

    "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Again, in an ideal world, perhaps. That's *exactly* what I mean about
    > respect: The male riders I know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag
    > about how extreme they are, and haven't a
    shred
    > of respect for anybody who shys away from the most difficult trails. It's none of their business;
    > but they make it their business. Maybe it's different for women. I hope so.

    I've gone riding with guys who have a lot of attitude. When they start talking smack I always
    just laugh at them and say I'm not trying to impress anyone. Most of the time they don't know
    how to react.

    Gary in VA
     
  6. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Thu, 24 Apr 2003 16:33:25 -0700, Penny S. wrote:

    > harumpph, sounds like you need new riding pals.

    "Hey, I didn't get a harumpph from that guy"

    "Harumpph!"

    "Better."

    If you've ridden a number of years, you get comfortable with the fact that people have different
    skill levels and don't feel the need to belittle others. We all had a point where the obstacles made
    us nervous. Some still make me nervous!

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  7. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Stephen Baker wrote:

    >>The male riders I know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about how
    >>extreme they are, and haven't a shred of respect for anybody who shys away from the most
    >>difficult trails.
    >
    >
    > That sounds like a dictionary definition of "A$$hole". The ones that make the most noise are
    > prob-babbly the biggest Barneys of the bunch. Drop 'em, do what you want to do, and don't
    > look back.

    If that's the way things truly are then I agree, but I think it may well be different and our friend
    here has gossamer-like skin.

    Firstly, if they're your mates, then you should realise that they're going to give you stick if you
    don't ride stuff. Friends often have a better idea of your strengths anyway, and banter amongst
    friends is par for the course. Friends egging on each other is a very good way of progressing too,
    and people are often surprised by their own abilities. Quite frankly, having someone of a similar
    ability who complained that "it's too hard" every time we got to a technical bit of trail would get
    right on my tits.

    I think it's a good idea that people are aware of their limits, but what about people who don't even
    get close to their limits and then complain about their friends encouraging them?

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  8. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Stephen Baker wrote:
    >
    > >>The male riders I know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about how
    > >>extreme they are, and haven't a
    shred
    > >>of respect for anybody who shys away from the most difficult trails.
    > >
    > >
    > > That sounds like a dictionary definition of "A$$hole". The ones that
    make the
    > > most noise are prob-babbly the biggest Barneys of the bunch. Drop 'em, do what you want to do,
    > > and don't look back.
    >
    > If that's the way things truly are then I agree, but I think it may well be different and our
    > friend here has gossamer-like skin.
    >
    > Firstly, if they're your mates, then you should realise that they're going to give you stick if
    > you don't ride stuff. Friends often have a better idea of your strengths anyway, and banter
    > amongst friends is par for the course. Friends egging on each other is a very good way of
    > progressing too, and people are often surprised by their own abilities. Quite frankly, having
    > someone of a similar ability who complained that "it's too hard" every time we got to a technical
    > bit of trail would get right on my tits.
    >
    > I think it's a good idea that people are aware of their limits, but what about people who don't
    > even get close to their limits and then complain about their friends encouraging them?
    >
    > --
    > a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm
    >
    > a.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
    >

    I had a mate like that when we were in our early twenties. Had bought himself a Honda CBR600 and
    wouldn't even go near the red line on the rev counter. "Didn't like hearing the engine" is what he
    said. He might as well have bought himself a nifty fifty for all he ever did with it. It was almost
    embarrassing in some funny way, because he was cabable of riding it better (he used to ride his
    Suzuki GN250 harder). We were always waiting for him to catch up. A waste of a bike in some other
    ways... I still can't figure out what the problem was even now.
    --
    Westie
     
  9. Tom Walker

    Tom Walker Guest

    "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    <Tales of woe snipped>

    First off, get some new riding buddies with mental capacities that would at least match those of a
    16 year old. I've ridden with a lot of different people with skill levels all over the map and
    although some may push me to try new, difficult things harder than others, none have ever
    disrespected me for declining the challenge. That's unacceptable and NOT common.

    It sounds like you both need a little more confidence on technical trails. Usually, we get that
    confidence by rider with people who are better than us and courteous enough show us a thing or two.
    since you don't have those people around you, I would suggest you both take a beginner mountain
    biking class. The local advocacy group in my area (www.nemba.org) hold several, and I've tought a
    few. They cover very basic mountain biking skills like obstacle clearing, downhill riding, and the
    importance of basic balance skills. It usually takes a couple of hours and you'll learn a TON. I
    guarantee you'll feel more confident after a similar class. If your local club doesn't offer this,
    try to find a decent, skilled rider who will go over the basics with you.

    I've seen plenty of people in these classes who were on the verge of quiting the sport after a few
    too many episodes like yours. After learning the basics they looked at mtbing with a lot more
    enthusiasm.

    [email protected]
     
  10. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:

    >Barry says:
    >
    >>The male riders I know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about how
    >>extreme they are, and haven't a shred of respect for anybody who shys away from the most
    >>difficult trails.
    >
    >That sounds like a dictionary definition of "A$$hole". The ones that make the most noise are
    >prob-babbly the biggest Barneys of the bunch. Drop 'em, do what you want to do, and don't
    >look back.

    A lot of riders will ride one particular difficult trail almost exclusively and then judge everyone
    else by their ability to ride that particular trail. They become one-trick ponies, and normally get
    dropped like yesterday's newspaper if they ride anywhere else.

    Now where's the fun in that?

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  11. The Ogre

    The Ogre Guest

    "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > >
    > > > I wish I had more time to ride trails, so I could get used to them. There are still quite a
    > > > few sections that I won't ride (washed-out, deeply rutted babyhead creek crossings; cliff-edge
    > > > singletrack that is eroded to nothing, etc) Hard core riders think I'm a wimp. I don't care. I
    > > > have insurance; but don't feel like bleeding for my sport. I respect the more skilled riders.
    > > > I just wish they'd respect me for choosing not to be reckless.
    > > >
    > > > -Barry
    > > One of the beauties of this sport is that there isn't a "right" level of difficulty, it's
    > > whatever feels appropriate for you.
    >
    > For guys it may be a little different. I feel a great deal of pressure to "go for it" when I'm
    > with groups of testosterone-pumped males on the trails. That's why I avoid those situations almost
    > completely and try to ride solo as much as possible (even though it's less safe).

    I'm not certain that I buy this, I don't recall any group rides where people have pressured me to
    push myself beyond my limits. About the only pressure I do feel is when I am slowing a group up.
    When I have passed on technical sections noone bothers me.

    > > Granted as I've ridden more, I WANT to try harder stuff but if I choose to ride doubletrack for
    > > the rest of my life, it's no body's business but my own.
    -=(Go Penny ! )=-

    > Again, in an ideal world, perhaps. That's *exactly* what I mean about respect: The male riders I
    > know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about how extreme they are,
    > and haven't a shred of respect for anybody who shys away from the most difficult trails. It's none
    > of their business; but they make it their business. Maybe it's different for women. I hope so.

    Again I just don't get this kind of attitude. Perhaps you are just riding with a bunch of Cool
    Mountain Dewds. Try hooking up with a mountain biking club or ride group in your area rather than
    your normal buds and you will probably see an entirely different attitude.

    The other possibility is as bomba suggested. Perhaps you just aren't pushing your limits. If you
    don't push your limits you will never improve.

    -- The Ogre http://ogrehut.com
     
  12. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Tom Walker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > <Tales of woe snipped>
    >
    > First off, get some new riding buddies with mental capacities that would at least match those of a
    > 16 year old. I've ridden with a lot of different people with skill levels all over the map and
    > although some may push me to try new, difficult things harder than others, none have ever
    > disrespected me for declining the challenge. That's unacceptable and NOT common.

    Here in Illinois, I think many of the riders use attitude to prove to themselves that they're the
    equal of the hardcore riders they read about in the magazines. This is not mountain country. There
    aren't many trails. These guys haven't been humbled by epic lung-busting climbs and insanely twisty
    super-fast downhills. They're racer boy wannabe's, and they need desperately to pound their chests.

    Knuckledraggers are pathetic; but around here, they are in abundance.

    > It sounds like you both need a little more confidence on technical trails.

    That comes with experience, which I hope to get more of.

    > Usually, we get that confidence by rider with people who are better than us and courteous enough
    > show us a thing or two. since you don't have those people around you, I would suggest you both
    > take a beginner mountain biking class. The local advocacy group in my area (www.nemba.org) hold
    > several, and I've tought a few. They cover very basic mountain biking skills like obstacle
    > clearing, downhill riding, and the importance of basic balance skills. It usually takes a couple
    > of hours and you'll learn a TON. I guarantee you'll feel more confident after a similar class. If
    > your local club doesn't offer this, try to find a decent, skilled rider who will go over the
    > basics with you.

    Thank you for the excellent suggestion. I'm sure it would help a lot. I'm not such a klutz, y'know.
    Good balance, decades of riding experience. I just have very little desire to "go extreme". I have
    nothing to prove, and I wish others would respect that. Sure, I'd like to progress; but not for any
    particular purpose (such as racing).

    > I've seen plenty of people in these classes who were on the verge of quiting the sport after a few
    > too many episodes like yours. After learning the basics they looked at mtbing with a lot more
    > enthusiasm.

    What I need is a respectful peer group. My cycling club friends - who are very respectful and
    helpful - are completely intimidated by offroad biking. They've done it enough to know they'll never
    try it again. "I almost killed myself" and "I fell 5 times and almost broke my collar bone" are the
    kind of comments I get from them.

    I didn't post this to whine. I posted it to offer a new perspective that isn't common on this NG: A
    non-beginner with moderate skills who feels disrespect for not wanting to be "extreme." I'll bet I'm
    not the only guy who has had this experience.

    -Barry
     
  13. Spider

    Spider Guest

    [email protected] (Tom Walker) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > <Tales of woe snipped>
    >
    > First off, get some new riding buddies with mental capacities that would at least match those of a
    > 16 year old. I've ridden with a lot of different people with skill levels all over the map and
    > although some may push me to try new, difficult things harder than others, none have ever
    > disrespected me for declining the challenge. That's unacceptable and NOT common.
    >
    > It sounds like you both need a little more confidence on technical trails. Usually, we get that
    > confidence by rider with people who are better than us and courteous enough show us a thing or
    > two. since you don't have those people around you, I would suggest you both take a beginner
    > mountain biking class. The local advocacy group in my area (www.nemba.org) hold several, and I've
    > tought a few. They cover very basic mountain biking skills like obstacle clearing, downhill
    > riding, and the importance of basic balance skills. It usually takes a couple of hours and you'll
    > learn a TON. I guarantee you'll feel more confident after a similar class. If your local club
    > doesn't offer this, try to find a decent, skilled rider who will go over the basics with you.
    >
    > I've seen plenty of people in these classes who were on the verge of quiting the sport after a few
    > too many episodes like yours. After learning the basics they looked at mtbing with a lot more
    > enthusiasm.

    Agreed.

    A gentle razzing is no big deal. Laying on the insults and catcalls is just shitty.

    But "MTB-Camp" would be cool. Heck I've learned a ton by watching others ride. I say to myself "that
    didn't look too bad - I'll try
    it." Next thing you know, I'm unconscious and bleeding...ooops, I meant to say, clearing the
    obstacle I thought was insurmountable. But then again, I'm not gonzo, but quite cautious in my
    riding. Too cautious, sometimes. Sometimes you have to "go for it" to clear it. But the guys the
    OP is talking about don't sound like they are looking to encourage skills. :(

    Spider
     
  14. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > B. Sanders wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I wish I had more time to ride trails, so I could get used to them. There are still quite a
    > > > few sections that I won't ride (washed-out, deeply rutted babyhead creek crossings; cliff-edge
    > > > singletrack that is eroded to nothing, etc) Hard core riders think I'm a wimp. I don't care. I
    > > > have insurance; but don't feel like bleeding for my sport. I respect the more skilled riders.
    > > > I just wish they'd respect me for choosing not to be reckless.
    > > >
    > > > -Barry
    > >
    >
    > -Barry
    >
    > PS: My wife still rides with me on the easy singletrack - just not on technical trails.

    Buddy, you need to find some new riding pals. The guys you describe, even if only half of what you
    say is true, are jerks. Why don't you recruit your existing friends into the sport, so that your
    friendship will be the focus, not some macho, who's got the biggest unit contest?

    Paladin
     
  15. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Stephen Baker wrote:
    > >
    > > >>The male riders I know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about
    > > >>how extreme they are, and haven't a
    > shred
    > > >>of respect for anybody who shys away from the most difficult trails.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > That sounds like a dictionary definition of "A$$hole". The ones that
    > make the
    > > > most noise are prob-babbly the biggest Barneys of the bunch. Drop 'em, do what you want to do,
    > > > and don't look back.
    > >
    > > If that's the way things truly are then I agree, but I think it may well be different and our
    > > friend here has gossamer-like skin.

    Meaning what, exactly?

    > > Firstly, if they're your mates, then you should realise that they're going to give you stick if
    > > you don't ride stuff. Friends often have a better idea of your strengths anyway, and banter
    > > amongst friends is par for the course. Friends egging on each other is a very good way of
    > > progressing too, and people are often surprised by their own abilities.

    I agree. Respectful banter can be good. Teaching skills to your friends is even better (much
    better). Maybe if I was 19 instead of 41, I'd have more tolerance for that kind of pushiness. Maybe
    I'd have more of an invincibility syndrome that would allow me to "go for it." Things change as you
    age. (Anybody here over 30?)

    > > Quite frankly, having someone of a similar ability who complained that "it's too hard" every
    > > time we got to a technical bit of trail would get right on my tits.

    Ok, fair enough. Why do you ride with other people if they get on your nerves?

    > > I think it's a good idea that people are aware of their limits, but what about people who don't
    > > even get close to their limits and then complain about their friends encouraging them?

    What about them? They like companionship; but don't like to be pushed. Is that wrong? It's difficult
    to find male friends who aren't pushy and competitive, often to recklessness. That's exactly what
    I'm trying to say.

    > I had a mate like that when we were in our early twenties. Had bought himself a Honda CBR600 and
    > wouldn't even go near the red line on the rev counter. "Didn't like hearing the engine" is what he
    > said. He might as well have bought himself a nifty fifty for all he ever did with it.

    That's his choice, and you should respect that.

    > It was almost embarrassing in some funny way, because he was cabable of riding it better (he used
    > to ride his Suzuki GN250 harder). We were always waiting for him to catch up. A waste of a bike in
    > some other ways... I still
    can't
    > figure out what the problem was even now.

    And so for you, life is a race, is that right? If you're not racing, then you're not having fun?
    "Pushing it harder" isn't the ultimate life goal for many people (even though that ethos is very
    popular nowadays, according to the media.)

    You and I are from different planets. I respect your views and skills; but do not share them.

    -Barry
     
  16. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Paladin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > B. Sanders wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > I wish I had more time to ride trails, so I could get used to them. There are still quite a
    > > > > few sections that I won't ride (washed-out, deeply rutted babyhead creek crossings;
    > > > > cliff-edge singletrack that is eroded to nothing, etc) Hard core riders think I'm a wimp. I
    > > > > don't care. I have insurance; but don't feel like bleeding for my sport. I respect the more
    > > > > skilled riders. I just wish they'd respect me for choosing not to be reckless.
    > > > >
    > > > > -Barry
    > > >
    > >
    > > -Barry
    > >
    > > PS: My wife still rides with me on the easy singletrack - just not on technical trails.
    >
    > Buddy, you need to find some new riding pals. The guys you describe, even if only half of what you
    > say is true, are jerks. Why don't you recruit your existing friends into the sport, so that your
    > friendship will be the focus, not some macho, who's got the biggest unit contest?

    Great advice, Palidin.

    Thanks to everybody who replied. I'm encouraged by all of your supportive responses.

    -Barry
     
  17. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    B. Sanders wrote:
    > I agree. Respectful banter can be good. Teaching skills to your friends is even better (much
    > better). Maybe if I was 19 instead of 41, I'd have more tolerance for that kind of pushiness.
    > Maybe I'd have more of an invincibility syndrome that would allow me to "go for
    > it." Things change as you age. (Anybody here over 30?)

    most of us I think.

    penny
     
  18. "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > The male riders I know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about how
    > extreme they are, and haven't a shred of respect for anybody who shys away from the most
    > difficult trails. It's none of their business; but they make it their business.

    Jeez. Just quit riding with Fagerlin...

    CC
     
  19. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Spider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Tom Walker) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > > <Tales of woe snipped>
    > >
    > > First off, get some new riding buddies with mental capacities that would at least match those of
    > > a 16 year old. I've ridden with a lot of different people with skill levels all over the map and
    > > although some may push me to try new, difficult things harder than others, none have ever
    > > disrespected me for declining the challenge. That's unacceptable and NOT common.
    > >
    > > It sounds like you both need a little more confidence on technical trails. Usually, we get that
    > > confidence by rider with people who are better than us and courteous enough show us a thing or
    > > two. since you don't have those people around you, I would suggest you both take a beginner
    > > mountain biking class. The local advocacy group in my area (www.nemba.org) hold several, and
    > > I've tought a few. They cover very basic mountain biking skills like obstacle clearing,
    > > downhill riding, and the importance of basic balance skills. It usually takes a couple of hours
    > > and you'll learn a TON. I guarantee you'll feel more confident after a similar class. If your
    > > local club doesn't offer this, try to find a decent, skilled rider who will go over the basics
    > > with you.
    > >
    > > I've seen plenty of people in these classes who were on the verge of quiting the sport after a
    > > few too many episodes like yours. After learning the basics they looked at mtbing with a lot
    > > more enthusiasm.
    >
    > Agreed.
    >
    > A gentle razzing is no big deal. Laying on the insults and catcalls is just shitty.
    >
    > But "MTB-Camp" would be cool. Heck I've learned a ton by watching others ride. I say to myself
    > "that didn't look too bad - I'll try
    > it." Next thing you know, I'm unconscious and bleeding...ooops, I meant to say, clearing the
    > obstacle I thought was insurmountable. But then again, I'm not gonzo, but quite cautious in my
    > riding. Too cautious, sometimes. Sometimes you have to "go for it" to clear it. But the guys
    > the OP is talking about don't sound like they are looking to encourage skills. :(
    >
    > Spider

    Yeah, a camp'd be cool. I think that I'd really enjoy going over some of the "basics" and some of
    the "no so basics" I've enquired in the past and there isn't too much around my area unfortunately.
    --
    Westie
     
  20. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > Stephen Baker wrote:
    > > >
    > > > >>The male riders I know are all about showing off and being hardcore. They love to brag about
    > > > >>how extreme they are, and haven't
    a
    > > shred
    > > > >>of respect for anybody who shys away from the most difficult trails.
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > That sounds like a dictionary definition of "A$$hole". The ones
    that
    > > make the
    > > > > most noise are prob-babbly the biggest Barneys of the bunch. Drop 'em, do what you want to
    > > > > do, and don't look back.
    > > >
    > > > If that's the way things truly are then I agree, but I think it may
    well
    > > > be different and our friend here has gossamer-like skin.
    >
    > Meaning what, exactly?
    >
    > > > Firstly, if they're your mates, then you should realise that they're going to give you stick
    > > > if you don't ride stuff. Friends often have a better idea of your strengths anyway, and banter
    > > > amongst friends is
    par
    > > > for the course. Friends egging on each other is a very good way of progressing too, and people
    > > > are often surprised by their own
    abilities.
    >
    > I agree. Respectful banter can be good. Teaching skills to your friends
    is
    > even better (much better). Maybe if I was 19 instead of 41, I'd have more tolerance for that kind
    > of pushiness. Maybe I'd have more of an invincibility syndrome that would allow me to "go for it."
    > Things change
    as
    > you age. (Anybody here over 30?)
    >
    > > > Quite frankly, having someone of a similar ability who complained
    that
    > > > "it's too hard" every time we got to a technical bit of trail would
    get
    > > > right on my tits.
    >
    > Ok, fair enough. Why do you ride with other people if they get on your nerves?
    >
    > > > I think it's a good idea that people are aware of their limits, but
    what
    > > > about people who don't even get close to their limits and then
    complain
    > > > about their friends encouraging them?
    >
    > What about them? They like companionship; but don't like to be pushed.
    Is
    > that wrong? It's difficult to find male friends who aren't pushy and competitive, often to
    > recklessness. That's exactly what I'm trying to
    say.
    >
    > > I had a mate like that when we were in our early twenties. Had bought himself a Honda CBR600 and
    > > wouldn't even go near the red line on the rev counter. "Didn't like hearing the engine" is what
    > > he said. He might as well have bought himself a nifty fifty for all he ever did with it.
    >
    > That's his choice, and you should respect that.
    >

    And while I never really understood it, Yes, I did respect it. You will notice that later in
    the post I mention that we always had to wait for him, but not once did we not invite him
    because of that...

    > > It was almost embarrassing in some funny way, because he was cabable of riding
    it
    > > better (he used to ride his Suzuki GN250 harder). We were always
    waiting
    > > for him to catch up. A waste of a bike in some other ways... I still
    > can't
    > > figure out what the problem was even now.
    >
    > And so for you, life is a race, is that right? If you're not racing, then you're not having fun?
    > "Pushing it harder" isn't the ultimate life goal
    for
    > many people (even though that ethos is very popular nowadays, according to the media.)
    >

    I don't particularly push the boundaries on my bike/s either - be they motor or mountain bikes -
    never have. Life a race? I don't consider myself highly competitive and never have. But having said
    that, if my friends didn't push me sometimes, and if I didn't push myself, then I might as well just
    pack up and go home because mountainbiking is just _too_ hard for lil' ol' me.

    I'll give a friend a push and a ribbing if needed ( isn't that one of the things friends are for?)
    but I would never push someone beyond their skill level just to prove something. And if they don't
    appreciate the pushing after a couple of times, you, as a friend, learn to lay off it. One should,
    equally, be able to take some pushing. There are levels of abuse and I'm not sure that your friends
    are being insensitive. You shouldn't be surprised if your friends push you to take risks. It's a
    risky sport. Just getting on a bike is dangerous for some (when was the last time you fell off on
    the way home from the Pub, Shaun?). Likewise, if you're a boxer don't complain if people are
    surprised when you refuse to take _any_ punches. Tell your friends to lay off and leave you to ride
    the way you want to. You can always go for help when they break their necks.
    --
    Westie

    > You and I are from different planets. I respect your views and skills; but do not share them.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...