Slow swimmer )))topdog +

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Bernard, Jun 17, 2003.

  1. Bernard

    Bernard Guest

    Hi topdog,

    First thanks to all of them who made time to answer.

    It was an open water swim: My time was 34 min for 1.3 km.

    At my opinion are my swim workouts very amateuristic : just get to the pool as much as I can and
    swim, just swim, that is all. This compared to my running where I am in an athletic club, and follow
    my personal schedule. What do I have to do? Do you have training schedules for swimming? I have 3 to
    4 times a week one half an hour time to train swimming, or even a litle more if I leave biking a bit
    a side. Sorry for my bad English (I do not have time to train that more).

    Please advice.

    Bernard

    PS : Why is my mail disapaered from the newsgroep after less than 24 hours???
     
    Tags:


  2. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Bernard" <bernard> wrote:

    > Hi topdog,
    >
    > First thanks to all of them who made time to answer.
    >
    > It was an open water swim: My time was 34 min for 1.3 km.
    >
    > At my opinion are my swim workouts very amateuristic : just get to the pool as much as I can and
    > swim, just swim, that is all. This compared to my running where I am in an athletic club, and
    > follow my personal schedule. What do I have to do? Do you have training schedules for swimming? I
    > have 3 to 4 times a week one half an hour time to train swimming, or even a litle more if I leave
    > biking a bit a side. Sorry for my bad English (I do not have time to train that more).
    >
    > Please advice.
    >
    > Bernard
    >
    > PS : Why is my mail disapaered from the newsgroep after less than 24 hours???
    >
    >

    Hey Bernard,

    If it makes you feel any better, you're faster than me! So don't worry about being last in a race...
    there'll always be someone slower than you
    :)

    Best of luck.

    Cam

    --
    Not every race can be a perfect experience, but every race can be a learning experience.
     
  3. Bernard wrote:
    >
    > Hi topdog,
    >
    > First thanks to all of them who made time to answer.
    >
    > It was an open water swim: My time was 34 min for 1.3 km.
    >
    > At my opinion are my swim workouts very amateuristic : just get to the pool as much as I can and
    > swim, just swim, that is all. This compared to my running where I am in an athletic club, and
    > follow my personal schedule. What do I have to do? Do you have training schedules for swimming? I
    > have 3 to 4 times a week one half an hour time to train swimming, or even a litle more if I leave
    > biking a bit a side.

    Take yourself to a book store and buy a book on swimming - or search the Internet for swimming
    workouts. Or, try this:

    3/4 of the way through your usual workout, stop, rest, then swim 100 meters at what feels like a
    brisk, but not all-out, pace, and take note of the time. If I do the math right, your
    above-mentioned swim is at a pace of about 2:36 per 100 meters, so let's guess that you can,
    giving a little extra effort, cover 100 meters in 2:10. Do that, then rest until you feel ready to
    try it again, and try it a second time. Once you're completed these two 100 meter brisk swims,
    resume your workout at your normal pace if you can - if you're too tired, that's OK, just swim a
    little to cool down and call it a day.

    The next workout at which you feel ready, try the same thing again, and this time take note of the
    recovery time. Perhaps, if you start your first 100 meters on an even minute on the clock, then 4:00
    after you started the first one, you'll be able to start the second one. Finish your workout as you
    did before.

    Gradually try to incorporate this speed session into every workout or at least 3x/week, but only
    once or twice per week is fine at the start, and gradually try to improve the quality of the workout
    by doing any or all of the following: lowering the swim time, lowering the recovery time, increasing
    the number of repetitions. You may find, as time passes, that you get bored swimming repeat 100
    meters so vary the distance as well - try 50 meters some times, going for faster than half your
    regular 100 meter time, or try 75 meters or evern 150 or 200 meters once in a while. Keep the
    following guideline in mind - you eventually want to find a pace for these sessions where the
    required recovery time is significantly less than the swim time, e.g., if you get the swim time down
    to 2:00, try to take only :30 rest before starting the next repetition. If you find you need a long
    recovery between each 100 meters, you're probably swimming too fast for this sort of workout. An
    all-out effort every once in a while is fun, and educational, too, but work mostly on a pace that
    you can do for anywhere from 3-10 repeats with relatively short rest periods. If you attend a swim
    team workout, you might find them swimming repeat 100 meters starting every 1:45 or even every 1:30,
    with the swimming time being such that only a :10 or so rest is allowed between repeats.

    > Sorry for my bad English (I do not have time to train that more).

    Your English is sufficient - no need to apologize.

    -S-

    > Please advice.
    >
    > Bernard
    >
    > PS : Why is my mail disapaered from the newsgroep after less than 24 hours???
     
  4. Topdog

    Topdog Guest

    "Bernard" <bernard> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi topdog,
    >
    > First thanks to all of them who made time to answer.
    >
    > It was an open water swim: My time was 34 min for 1.3 km.
    >
    > At my opinion are my swim workouts very amateuristic : just get to the pool as much as I can and
    > swim, just swim, that is all. This compared to my running where I am in an athletic club, and
    > follow my personal schedule. What do I have to do? Do you have training schedules for swimming? I
    > have 3 to 4 times a week one half an hour time to train swimming, or even a litle more if I leave
    > biking a bit a side. Sorry for my bad English (I do not have time to train that more).
    >
    > Please advice.
    >
    > Bernard
    >

    Actually, if you have just half an hour for your swims, it's hard to add much more. It would be nice
    if you could have at least one workout a week where you can put in more distance. That's one area
    where you can likely make a quick improvement on your overall time.

    As for your 1/2 hr swims, there's several things that you can do here. Probably, you can vary
    things, and try the following.

    - 1 time a week, work on your stroke. You should have some stroke drills and all from your time
    with the swim instructor.

    - 1 time a week, do some intervals. Go out and get warmed up first. Based on your open water time,
    I'm assuming that you put in about 1000+ yds in your 1/2 hr? With that in mind, take the speed
    that you do 100yds moderately at. Add 10 secs to that, and use it as a base time. Do say 4x100yds
    on that time, then 4x100yds on a time 5 sec faster, then 4x100yds 5 sec faster again. For
    example, let's say that you can do the 100 in 2:00. Your first interval would be 2:10 - do 4x100
    on 2:10, then 4x100 on 2:05, then 4x100 on 2:00. See how that works - you can adjust it
    accordingly. You want the last set to be hard work, where you can barely make the time. If you
    can't do all of them, that's fine too.
    - 1 time a week, add some sprints. Just go out and do your normal workout, but add this (again,
    based on 2:00 100 times - adjust accordingly) - end your workout with 6x50 on 1:45. Do the first
    25 easy, and rest 15 sec at the far wall. Sprint the last 25yds all out. At the end of 1:45
    repeat. The next week, do the same, but every other 50, do the whole 50 as a sprint. You then
    will be doing 1x25 easy, 1x25 sprint followed by 1x50 sprint, repeat twice.

    See how that works, and drop me a line if you have any questions.
     
  5. Jim Gosse

    Jim Gosse Guest

    May be time to hook up with a masters group. I saw great improvement when I got over the
    intimidation factor, and jumped into the masters lane. The coaches were excellent.

    34 minutes for 1.3km is not bad at all. Just keep working.

    --
    Jim Gosse OERC Wave Tank Memorial University
    (709)737-3221 [email protected]

    "Bernard" <bernard> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi topdog,
    >
    > First thanks to all of them who made time to answer.
    >
    > It was an open water swim: My time was 34 min for 1.3 km.
    >
    > At my opinion are my swim workouts very amateuristic : just get to the
    pool
    > as much as I can and swim, just swim, that is all. This compared to my running where I am in an
    > athletic club, and follow my personal schedule. What do I have to do? Do you have training
    > schedules for swimming? I have
    3
    > to 4 times a week one half an hour time to train swimming, or even a litle more if I leave biking
    > a bit a side. Sorry for my bad English (I do not have time to train that more).
    >
    > Please advice.
    >
    > Bernard
    >
    > PS : Why is my mail disapaered from the newsgroep after less than 24 hours???
     
  6. Topdog

    Topdog Guest

    "Jim Gosse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > May be time to hook up with a masters group. I saw great improvement when I got over the
    > intimidation factor, and jumped into the masters lane. The coaches were excellent.
    >
    > 34 minutes for 1.3km is not bad at all. Just keep working.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Jim Gosse OERC Wave Tank Memorial University
    > (709)737-3221 [email protected]
    >

    Agreed on both of those. 34 min is not a bad time. If you have the time and the ability to be free
    an evening or two, a masters group is a great way to go for ANYONE. You will likely get some
    coaching, plus workouts with a group are almost always more productive.

    I forgot to mention it again above, but low weight\high rep weight training is also a very good
    thing to work on. Here's what I would work on -

    biceps curls triceps extension bent over rows bench press lat pull military press knee extension
    hamstring curls upright rows
     
  7. Mark J

    Mark J Guest

    Something that I do not see mentioned in these discussions. For pool swimmers, the turnaround can be
    a significant part of the swim portion effort. A good clean pushoff can give you a significant boost
    on every length.

    I frequently gain several feet on people I swim with. Each turnaround, I get close to the wall, flip
    turn, and give a healthy shove. Then I pretend that I am superman, and glide and stretch until
    almost all my momentum is gone, then take my first stroke. One my second stroke, which is a
    breathing stroke, I look up and can see the flags are at my waist. By this time most other swimmers
    have done three or four strokes.

    This gives me a nice little rest period, and well as gliding a significant portion of the pool
    length. This would not be a good idea for someone racing 200m, but for tri distances, I think it
    works well, both for speed and energy conservation.

    I think the concept can be applied to flip turners and non flippers.

    mark
     
  8. [email protected] (Mark J) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Something that I do not see mentioned in these discussions. For pool swimmers, the turnaround can
    > be a significant part of the swim portion effort. A good clean pushoff can give you a significant
    > boost on every length.
    >
    > I frequently gain several feet on people I swim with. Each turnaround, I get close to the wall,
    > flip turn, and give a healthy shove. Then I pretend that I am superman, and glide and stretch
    > until almost all my momentum is gone, then take my first stroke. One my second stroke, which is a
    > breathing stroke, I look up and can see the flags are at my waist. By this time most other
    > swimmers have done three or four strokes.
    >
    > This gives me a nice little rest period, and well as gliding a significant portion of the pool
    > length. This would not be a good idea for someone racing 200m, but for tri distances, I think it
    > works well, both for speed and energy conservation.
    >
    > I think the concept can be applied to flip turners and non flippers.
    >
    > mark
    >

    Just keep in mind that the only benefit to improving your pool turns for an open water swim is that
    it makes your longer sets more continous than an open turn. You mention that you gain distance on
    other swimmer because of your turns, and this will help you in a swim meet. However, one of the guys
    that I swim with is faster than me, but doesn't come off the wall as fast due to back problems. I
    can keep up with him on any swim up to 400yd in a 25 yd pool. In open water, there's no way I could
    hang with him.

    Since most tris are open water, don't count on your "wall skills" to make a difference.
     
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