Smart Cycle Computer/Alarm Clock instructions required

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by lottos, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. lottos

    lottos New Member

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    My son's bike computer (speedo) had a flat battery.

    I have replaced the battery but cannot find the original instructions and am hoping someone will have them available. I know how to attach the magnet etc. on the wheel, I need the set up for setting km/h rather than mph, setting the wheel size etc.

    It was bought from Dick Smith Electronics and looks identical to this (although the one we have has the 'Smart' brand name on the top of the unit, but I figure it all comes from the same factory):

    http://www.dse.com.au/isroot/dse/images/products/y4116~lge.jpg

    Your help will be appreciated by myself and my son!
     
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  2. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    I have the manual for the one from DSE. It should be possible to scan or photocopy some of the pages. Where do you live? Are you in Sydney?

    Mike
     
  3. lottos

    lottos New Member

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    wow thanks!

    I'm in Hobart unfortunately - if you're able to scan them do you have web space you could upload to, or if you prefer, pls send me a message and I'll provide my email address.... I'd really appreciate it!
     
  4. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    I am scanning the settings pages now

    I can put them up on my home pages

    Mike
     
  5. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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  6. lottos

    lottos New Member

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  7. lottos

    lottos New Member

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    one thing that is interesting with these cycle odometers etc. is how they say to get the circumference of the wheel for inputting into the unit, yet when it comes to placing the censor on the wheel, it's no where near the circumference of the wheel - it's placed on the spokes which has a much smaller circumference than the outside of the wheel!

    :)
     
  8. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    The sensor counts the revolutions and adds the wheel circumference to the distance each revolution.

    The technique I use to determine the circumfirence of the tyre is:-

    Pump tyres to normal riding pressure

    with the rider on the bike

    (I use a straight length of footpath)

    mark start position with tyre valve stem at bottom of wheel

    roll the bike in as straight line as possible for 10 wheel revolutions with the bike taking the weight of the rider.

    mark the end position after 10 revolutions.

    measure the distance between start and end positions in cm.

    Enter the distance for 10 revolutions, for example 2050cm, as 2050mm as wheel circumference in mm.

    A 25 to 30 metre tape is required.

    if sensor is on rear wheel, rear wheel must be measured, for 10 revolutions of rear wheel.

    Other number of wheel revolutions can be used(2, 4, 5, 8 etc), but distance
    measured must be divided by the number of wheel revolutions.

    10 is the easiest if you have the longer tape measure.

    Mike
     
  9. rockmanwa

    rockmanwa New Member

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    Hey,

    I found myself in the same position with a cyclocomputer with a battery at the end of its life, and in need of the instructions when a replacement battery was purchased (it is one of the few times that I have not been able to find the original instructions for an item [I am not too bad normally at retaining things like this] ).

    Anyway, big thanks to Mike for posting the instructions (ironically for such a simple device, the programming is a bit complicated for the cyclocomputer).

    Also a thanks to the original father and son team that put the request out there, which resulted in the helpful posting.

    By the way, there are easier ways to measure circumference of a wheel (for the item to calculate travel speed and distance on a bike).

    Why not just use a short tape measure (5m) and lay it along the tyre surface of the wheel so tht it goes all the way around? Presto, a result. Circumference of the unweighted wheel. Alternatively, lay the tape on the ground and align the wheel valve at the bottom with the start of the tape, push the bike forward until the wheel and valve have done a complete turn. That point on the tape is the circumference. Presto.

    Another method: Use a tape to measure the height (diameter) of the standing wheel. Mulitply the diametre by Pi (3.1415926...) to get the circumference. Easy. :) The method I use.

    If you want to allow for weight on the wheels (not much of an issue with thin road bike wheel due to high pressure), which may be a consideration for MTB or hybrids, then just estimate the loss of height when the bike is weighted (say 2 cm lower than the original axis point, the axle, and therefore a loss in radius), then double this figure (to say 4cm, the reduction [change] in overall diameter of the turning wheel, and therefore circumference). Use this new diametre figure, then mutiply by Pi. Easy

    Conrad






     
  10. thereistruth

    thereistruth New Member

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    The computer only needs to know the circumference of the surface of the wheel. It does not matter where the sensor is, because the sensor is only there to measure revolutions, and it will calculate the same revolutions whether it is close to the center or out near the tire. Let's say the circumference is 30 inches; the computer will now know that with one revolution, the bike will have traveled 30 inches, and that is how it computes speed. So it doesn't matter where the sensor is placed on the tire.
     
  11. john_perth

    john_perth New Member

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    i realise the last post on this thread was made a few years ago but im hoping someone will be able to reply to me. i have the same 'smart cyclecomputer/alarm clock' and i hav lost the instruction manual, hence how i found this site in the first place. i cant work out how to reset all the data values, like average speed and the odometre reading and so forth. any help would be muchly appreciated
     
  12. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I have a new one (boxed) here, you are welcome to call in with your computer..
     
  13. john_perth

    john_perth New Member

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    Thanks George, i hav actually worked out how to do it, u just need to press the mode and the s/s buttons at the same time, this clears everything except the odometre and the max speed. i actually live in Bassendean too by the way, and my dads name is George, initially i thought u were him playing a joke on me, but then i noticed u have been a member for some time. thanks for the offer of help.
     
  14. cyclenz

    cyclenz New Member

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    I appreciate this thread has been inactive for a while.

    I've the same problem, I don't suppose anyone has any instructions for the lian cycle computer?
     
  15. cyclenz

    cyclenz New Member

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    I don't suppose you still have the lian cycle computer instructions?
     
  16. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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