Smokeless Tobacco/ Risk Reduction

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Daniel L. Lurke, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. There has been some evidence that patients who switch from
    cigarette smoking to smokeless tobacco products
    substantially decrease their risk of mortality. Has anyone
    had exposure to patients who have embraced this strategy? I
    am curious about patient experiences, as well as general
    reactions to the concept.
     
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  2. Daniel L. Lurker wrote:
    > There has been some evidence that patients who switch from
    > cigarette smoking to smokeless tobacco products
    > substantially decrease their risk of mortality. Has anyone
    > had exposure to patients who have embraced this strategy?
    > I am curious about patient experiences, as well as general
    > reactions to the concept.

    This may be true, but it's not an approach I'd use.
    Smokeless tobacco is still a potent carcinogen to
    any tissues it contacts. I'm a dentist, so I'm not
    familiar with the carcinogenesis stats for upper
    respiratory cancers for inhaled snuff, but chewing
    tobacco is truly awful stuff. I've heard of oral
    cancers after just a few years of use. The other
    issue is the addiction issue--chemical dependence
    vs. the oral habit itself. Since there are
    medically supervised nicotine aids to smoking
    cessation that don't have the tars and other
    carcinogens, and since the mode of nicotine
    administration is changing anyway, why wouldn't you
    opt for a medically safer switch?

    Good luck, Steve
     
  3. Daniel L. Lurker wrote:
    > There has been some evidence that patients who switch from
    > cigarette smoking to smokeless tobacco products
    > substantially decrease their risk of mortality. Has anyone
    > had exposure to patients who have embraced this strategy?
    > I am curious about patient experiences, as well as general
    > reactions to the concept.

    This may be true, but it's not an approach I'd use.
    Smokeless tobacco is still a potent carcinogen to
    any tissues it contacts. I'm a dentist, so I'm not
    familiar with the carcinogenesis stats for upper
    respiratory cancers for inhaled snuff, but chewing
    tobacco is truly awful stuff. I've heard of oral
    cancers after just a few years of use. The other
    issue is the addiction issue--chemical dependence
    vs. the oral habit itself. Since there are
    medically supervised nicotine aids to smoking
    cessation that don't have the tars and other
    carcinogens, and since the mode of nicotine
    administration is changing anyway, why wouldn't you
    opt for a medically safer switch?

    Good luck, Steve
     
  4. Hcn

    Hcn Guest

    "Daniel L. Lurker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > There has been some evidence that patients who switch from
    > cigarette smoking to smokeless tobacco products
    > substantially decrease their risk of mortality.

    What evidence? There is nothing about that here:
    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/smokelesstobacco.html

    We have a cousin in his early forties who has had half
    of his jaw removed due to cancer (from smoking and
    smokeless tobacco)... sure, he is still alive, but in a
    great deal of pain.

    Has anyone had exposure to patients who have
    > embraced this strategy? I am curious about patient
    > experiences, as well as general reactions to the concept.
     
  5. Hcn

    Hcn Guest

    "Daniel L. Lurker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > There has been some evidence that patients who switch from
    > cigarette smoking to smokeless tobacco products
    > substantially decrease their risk of mortality.

    What evidence? There is nothing about that here:
    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/smokelesstobacco.html

    We have a cousin in his early forties who has had half
    of his jaw removed due to cancer (from smoking and
    smokeless tobacco)... sure, he is still alive, but in a
    great deal of pain.

    Has anyone had exposure to patients who have
    > embraced this strategy? I am curious about patient
    > experiences, as well as general reactions to the concept.
     
  6. Amy

    Amy Guest

    Steven Bornfeld <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Daniel L. Lurker wrote:
    > > There has been some evidence that patients who switch
    > > from cigarette smoking to smokeless tobacco products
    > > substantially decrease their risk of mortality. Has
    > > anyone had exposure to patients who have embraced this
    > > strategy? I am curious about patient experiences, as
    > > well as general reactions to the concept.
    >
    >
    > This may be true, but it's not an approach I'd use.
    > Smokeless tobacco is still a potent carcinogen to
    > any tissues it contacts. I'm a dentist, so I'm not
    > familiar with the carcinogenesis stats for upper
    > respiratory cancers for inhaled snuff, but chewing
    > tobacco is truly awful stuff. I've heard of oral
    > cancers after just a few years of use. The other
    > issue is the addiction issue--chemical dependence
    > vs. the oral habit itself. Since there are medically
    > supervised nicotine aids to smoking cessation that
    > don't have the tars and other carcinogens, and since
    > the mode of nicotine administration is changing
    > anyway, why wouldn't you opt for a medically safer
    > switch?
    >
    > Good luck, Steve

    Steve, Are there different types of smokeless tobacco and do
    any particular types offer less potential for cancer? Do you
    have any idea what in the smokeless tobacco is carcinogenic?

    Amy Lyn R.N.
     
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