Smorgasbord - Stort Koldt Bord

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Tank, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. Tank

    Tank Guest

    I ran across a reference to these phrases in a finction book
    I was reading. I tried Google, but everything that came back
    was in Danish!

    Can anyone give me some basic info as to the differences in
    the meanings of these phrases? I infer that Koldt Bord could
    roughly be translated as "cold board", meaning a cold
    buffet, but I am not familiar with the modifier "Stort".

    What does Stort Koldt Bord consist of, and how does it
    differ from Smorgasbord?

    --
    Tank

    This Space To Let
     
    Tags:


  2. Jacqui{Jb}

    Jacqui{Jb} Guest

    "Tank" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I ran across a reference to these phrases in a finction
    > book I was reading. I tried Google, but everything that
    > came back was in Danish!

    Probably because they *are* Danish, well stort koldt bord is
    anyway. Smorgasbord -- more properly smorgåsbrod -- is
    Swedish. Smorgåsbord *used* to be the Danish equivalent (or
    vice versa) of smørrebrød, a collection of open-faced
    sandwiches, very often on coarse black bread spread with
    fedt (rendered pork fat which has been seasoned with salt,
    crackling and/or crisp onion bits) or butter, but has
    basically been bastardized to mean any kind of buffet.

    In Sweden, you'll also find sandwiches made on crisp bread
    -- knäckebrod. Traditional Danish sandwich toppings include
    shrimps with mayonnaise (generally only on white bread), egg
    and shrimp with mayonnaise (again, on white bread); cold
    fried fish; a wide variety of pickled herring, cold smoked
    salmon, hot smoked salmon (although I more often see hot
    smoked salmon served as a course of its own, rather than as
    a sandwich), cold pork roast with or without the crispy
    skin, cold roast beef, warm smoked eel with scrambled egg,
    smoked mackerel with a raw egg yolk and snipped chives ...
    all of which are beautifully garnished.

    > Can anyone give me some basic info as to the differences
    > in the meanings of these phrases? I infer that Koldt Bord
    > could roughly be translated as "cold board", meaning a
    > cold buffet, but I am not familiar with the modifier
    > "Stort".

    Stort means large -- so you've basically got a big
    cold buffet.

    > What does Stort Koldt Bord consist of, and how does it
    > differ from Smorgasbord?

    As noted above, a traditional Swedish smorgåsbord confines
    itself mainly to sandwiches (or sandwich-making items);
    ditto Danish smørrebrød. A cold buffet would include a
    variety of cold dishes *and* a couple of hot ones (don't
    complain to me, I didn't make the rules! :)), such as: cold
    cuts, herring of various types, smoked fish, cheeses,
    vegetables, salads, condiments, breads (including crisp
    breads) and hot dishes such as frickadeller (similar to
    swedish meatballs but generally not served with a sauce or
    gravy), roast pork, fried fish (sometimes warm pickled fried
    fish, which is a treat), and maybe a hot vegetable dish such
    as stewed cabbage.

    I'm sure I've left something out, but I'm sure you get the
    idea.

    -Jacqui [going into my fourth year in Denmark]
     
  3. Tank

    Tank Guest

    "jacqui{JB}" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Stort means large -- so you've basically got a big
    > cold buffet.
    >
    > > What does Stort Koldt Bord consist of, and how does it
    > > differ from Smorgasbord?
    >

    Hi Jacqui,

    I can't thank you enough! I wanted to employ the term Stort
    Koldt Bord in a menu for a church function, and wanted to
    make sure I was using it correctly. Turns out, I am! I am
    going to feature some of the food items you mentioned, and I
    am gratified to learn it is appropriate.

    Thanks so very much!

    --
    Tank

    This Space To Let
     
Loading...