snapped frame repair



R

rickster

Guest
I have snapped my aluminium commuting MTB frame clean through on the
RHS chain stay just behind the "cross member" which sits behind the
BB. Must be all that power !!

Anyhoo, I am going to try and get it repaired and my first quote from
an LBS was >$ 200 if I strip the bike down myself ! (I paid $ 450
for it 2nd hand 3 years ago, it's a Merida Matts Speed). Am loking for
any one with similar experience to give a ball park figure so as to
know what is reasonable and what is not for such a repair ?

Thanks
 
You're being rather sentimental. Treat yourself to a new bike, (or see the
fine collection of not stolen items at Cash Converters). Go on, you deserve
it.
 
rickster wrote:
> I have snapped my aluminium commuting MTB frame clean through on the
> RHS chain stay just behind the "cross member" which sits behind the
> BB. Must be all that power !!
>
> Anyhoo, I am going to try and get it repaired and my first quote from
> an LBS was >$ 200 if I strip the bike down myself ! (I paid $ 450
> for it 2nd hand 3 years ago, it's a Merida Matts Speed). Am loking for
> any one with similar experience to give a ball park figure so as to
> know what is reasonable and what is not for such a repair ?
>
> Thanks


Give these guys a call

http://www.gripsport.com.au/

Parbs
 
Parbs said:
rickster wrote:
> I have snapped my aluminium commuting MTB frame clean through on the
> RHS chain stay just behind the "cross member" which sits behind the
> BB. Must be all that power !!
>
> Anyhoo, I am going to try and get it repaired and my first quote from
> an LBS was >$ 200 if I strip the bike down myself ! (I paid $ 450
> for it 2nd hand 3 years ago, it's a Merida Matts Speed). Am loking for
> any one with similar experience to give a ball park figure so as to
> know what is reasonable and what is not for such a repair ?
>
> Thanks


Give these guys a call

http://www.gripsport.com.au/

Parbs
you could pick up a new frame for close to that. I hate disposable attitude of many but the practicalities of paying $200+ on an already 2nd hand frame are a bit grey IMHO
 
"SteppenW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> You're being rather sentimental. Treat yourself to a new bike, (or see

the
> fine collection of not stolen items at Cash Converters). Go on, you

deserve
> it.


And for commuting use, make it a steel frame. Should be plenty of good
quality steel MTB frames about. They'll easily last you 20 years, no matter
how powerful you are, and if they do break or get damaged you can get them
repaired.

I've always been stunned by the concept of taking a $2000 alloy suspension
MTB, designed for competitive use on rough forest trails, and then riding it
on a tarmac commute in rainy Melbourne roads, with no mudguards. So many
seem to see this as the right tool for the job.

Cheers
Peter
 
>snapped frame repair


AlisaHomes94583

will take 20 mons.
 
"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> And for commuting use, make it a steel frame. Should be plenty of good
> quality steel MTB frames about. They'll easily last you 20 years, no

matter
> how powerful you are, and if they do break or get damaged you can get them
> repaired.


GripSport will fix alu frames too. The GT Talera I often commute
on cost me $300 with lots of extra stuff. It was showroom condition.
Get something like that, make it SS, add some stickers, done! :)

> I've always been stunned by the concept of taking a $2000 alloy suspension
> MTB, designed for competitive use on rough forest trails, and then riding

it
> on a tarmac commute in rainy Melbourne roads, with no mudguards. So many
> seem to see this as the right tool for the job.


You've got to remember that a lot of these people only
have one bike. They're either racers, who slick up their
race bike, or 'normal' folk most of whom buy mtb's..
I took me 5 years of Melbourne riding before I bought
my first mudguard.. still none for the front..

hippy
- black backside means nothing if the bike looks nice ;-)
 
"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> "SteppenW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> >
> > You're being rather sentimental. Treat yourself to a new bike, (or see

> the
> > fine collection of not stolen items at Cash Converters). Go on, you

> deserve
> > it.

>
> And for commuting use, make it a steel frame. Should be plenty of good
> quality steel MTB frames about. They'll easily last you 20 years, no matter
> how powerful you are, and if they do break or get damaged you can get them
> repaired.
>
> I've always been stunned by the concept of taking a $2000 alloy suspension
> MTB, designed for competitive use on rough forest trails, and then riding it
> on a tarmac commute in rainy Melbourne roads, with no mudguards. So many
> seem to see this as the right tool for the job.
>


Consider that such a bike is suitable for multiple roles but a nice
and stiff, strong and heavy upright steel framed job is a fine
commuter but shite for a mountain trail. Certainly my thoughts when I
purchased my MTB and the dual roles it has (had !!)
 
"rickster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message

news:<[email protected]>...

> > I've always been stunned by the concept of taking a $2000 alloy

suspension
> > MTB, designed for competitive use on rough forest trails, and then

riding it
> > on a tarmac commute in rainy Melbourne roads, with no mudguards. So many
> > seem to see this as the right tool for the job.
> >

>
> Consider that such a bike is suitable for multiple roles but a nice
> and stiff, strong and heavy upright steel framed job is a fine
> commuter but shite for a mountain trail. Certainly my thoughts when I
> purchased my MTB and the dual roles it has (had !!)


....a nice and stiff, light but fragile suspended alloy framed job is a fine
offf-road racer but shite for commuting. Certainly my thoughts when I
purchased my steel MTB (which has been used for commuting, off-road trail
riding and extended touring)

Alcan is fine for a single-use VB, and makes a nice light off-road MTB (I
have one too), but for a hard-wearing commuter steel is real, and not so
heavy.

But really, my issue is more about the lack of provision for mudguards,
lights, racks for gear etc on a bike that instead puts a focus on a
superlight alloy frame and unnecessary suspension. Translate it to the world
of racing - trackies don't ride their 20sp Campag-equipped road bike on the
velodrome, and (most) roadies don't ride a fixed gear on the road. Horses
for courses.

Cheers
Peter
 
"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "rickster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > Consider that such a bike is suitable for multiple roles but a nice
> > and stiff, strong and heavy upright steel framed job is a fine
> > commuter but shite for a mountain trail. Certainly my thoughts when I
> > purchased my MTB and the dual roles it has (had !!)

>
> ...a nice and stiff, light but fragile suspended alloy framed job is a

fine
> offf-road racer but shite for commuting. Certainly my thoughts when I
> purchased my steel MTB (which has been used for commuting, off-road trail
> riding and extended touring)


They're not THAT bad.. but my Montari isn't stupid-light and
still has provisions for racks and guards.

> Alcan is fine for a single-use VB, and makes a nice light off-road MTB (I
> have one too), but for a hard-wearing commuter steel is real, and not so
> heavy.


Yay for Surly!
http://www.surlybikes.com/spew1.html

> But really, my issue is more about the lack of provision for mudguards,
> lights, racks for gear etc on a bike that instead puts a focus on a
> superlight alloy frame and unnecessary suspension. Translate it to the

world
> of racing - trackies don't ride their 20sp Campag-equipped road bike on

the
> velodrome, and (most) roadies don't ride a fixed gear on the road. Horses
> for courses.


Mudguards and lights are often clip-on items. Rack mounts
disappear on the more pure race machines but I prefer to
use a bag than panniers and there's always seatpost racks..

I only have 18spd Shimano for the velo.. time to upgrade? ;)

It's very hard to get decent components on steel bikes and
most bikes off the shelf are alu so I can see why most
commuters are on alu bikes. Who, other than the freaks in
here, gets any pleasure from riding a shitter? If people are
going to ride they're gonna want a nice bike to impress all
da ladies wit' (or men if that's ya thing ;-) ). You're already
the office dag for wearing lycra.. don't make it worse with
the 20yo clunker from hell. ;-) At least, that's why I think
peeps ride their alu race machines..

hippy
 
"hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> It's very hard to get decent components on steel bikes and
> most bikes off the shelf are alu so I can see why most
> commuters are on alu bikes. Who, other than the freaks in
> here, gets any pleasure from riding a shitter? If people are
> going to ride they're gonna want a nice bike to impress all
> da ladies wit' (or men if that's ya thing ;-) ). You're already
> the office dag for wearing lycra.. don't make it worse with
> the 20yo clunker from hell. ;-) At least, that's why I think
> peeps ride their alu race machines..


I still love my steel MTB commuter; although I ride the crappiest bike I
own (the hybrid) as a commuter, the YAK (double-butted cromo, stx-rc
everywhere) was my first serious bike and it's lasted 6 years as my only
bike. it's becoming the SO's first bike as well.

-A
 
I have an tcr1 which cracked in the same place....Quantum cycles quoted
$400+
difficult to weld aluminum, its would have to be baked in oven after which
would ruin paint so a respray is required....so
I went and saw a mate who works in a cylinder head recon firm he put a ****
load of aluminum/weld on, didnt grind it back as first time he did a
cosmetic job it cracked in same place, this time left about 4mm raised patch
on, 40mm long so far so good...
can of white paint from bunnings looks great as weld is mostly hidden behind
chain ring..........cost a bottle of scotch & can of paint.......


"rickster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have snapped my aluminium commuting MTB frame clean through on the
> RHS chain stay just behind the "cross member" which sits behind the
> BB. Must be all that power !!
>
> Anyhoo, I am going to try and get it repaired and my first quote from
> an LBS was >$ 200 if I strip the bike down myself ! (I paid $ 450
> for it 2nd hand 3 years ago, it's a Merida Matts Speed). Am loking for
> any one with similar experience to give a ball park figure so as to
> know what is reasonable and what is not for such a repair ?
>
> Thanks
 
Parbs said:
rickster wrote:
> I have snapped my aluminium commuting MTB frame clean through on the
> RHS chain stay just behind the "cross member" which sits behind the
> BB. Must be all that power !!
>
> Anyhoo, I am going to try and get it repaired and my first quote from
> an LBS was >$ 200 if I strip the bike down myself ! (I paid $ 450
> for it 2nd hand 3 years ago, it's a Merida Matts Speed). Am loking for
> any one with similar experience to give a ball park figure so as to
> know what is reasonable and what is not for such a repair ?
>
> Thanks


Give these guys a call

http://www.gripsport.com.au/

Parbs

Second vote for GripSport. They do good work at a fair price. Get your repaired frame powdercoated too. Stealth Black is good for commuting. :p
 
rickster said:
I have snapped my aluminium commuting MTB frame clean through on the
RHS chain stay just behind the "cross member" which sits behind the
BB. Must be all that power !!

Anyhoo, I am going to try and get it repaired and my first quote from
an LBS was >$ 200 if I strip the bike down myself ! (I paid $ 450
for it 2nd hand 3 years ago, it's a Merida Matts Speed). Am loking for
any one with similar experience to give a ball park figure so as to
know what is reasonable and what is not for such a repair ?

Thanks
Hello re frame repair, take off the crank remove BB take the frame to anyone who welds Aluminium and it should cost about $20 or a carton .
This is what I do all the time for frame repairs saves all the bull from frame builders. Its not rocket science just a cracked piece or metal.
It should last for years. Cheaper and less hassle than a new one.
Good luck Ron
 
ronni50 said:
Hello re frame repair, take off the crank remove BB take the frame to anyone who welds Aluminium and it should cost about $20 or a carton .
This is what I do all the time for frame repairs saves all the bull from frame builders. Its not rocket science just a cracked piece or metal.
It should last for years. Cheaper and less hassle than a new one.
Good luck Ron
Errr... actually it IS rocket science. I'd be more than happy to discuss everything from weld techniques to metalurgy to the properties of varying aluminium alloys and that little issue of heat affected zones... let alone the actual engineering that goes into a real "repair" as opposed to a quick weld-up... but the absolute bottom line (in answer to the question posed in this thread) is NO... you can NOT simply weld up a bike frame without making the area around the break "weaker" than it was in the first place. So don't do it Rickster. Either get it repaired properly or shout yourself a new frame.

Sorry for the gravedig, but I only just came across the site and this thread and seeing my business is even mentioned in it I felt compelled to clear up the MISconception that simply welding a frame is OK.
 
"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Alcan is fine for a single-use VB, and makes a nice light off-road MTB (I
> have one too), but for a hard-wearing commuter steel is real, and not so
> heavy.


What sort of off road do you do if your hard wearing bike is for
commuting? I have done both (not MTBing any more now; gone to the dark
side of roadying) and when I was barrelling down Mount Buller ski runs
(well, traversing them on the DH runs) and seven hour epics on rock
strewn trails in Eastern Victoria I wanted a hard wearing bike. Now
I'm commuting I can't really see the need for it.
Of course, my MTB is an alu dually and, yes, the frame was broken
twice. Replaced by the diamondback distributer on both occasions.