Some rice noodles are not meant for pan frying

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Mar 24, 2005.

  1. Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice vermicelli
    (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in Lipton
    chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked the
    noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full of
    meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.

    Can't remember what I bought these for originally, but I know what
    *not* to use them for in the future. I guess they're really meant for
    soup.

    June
     
    Tags:


  2. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice vermicelli
    > (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in Lipton
    > chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked the
    > noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full of
    > meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    > centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.
    >
    > Can't remember what I bought these for originally, but I know what
    > *not* to use them for in the future. I guess they're really meant for
    > soup.
    >
    > June


    I thnk you skipped a step before frying.

    rice vermicelli = sen mee (Thai) = mi fen (Chinese) = mei fun (Chinese) =
    mai fun (Japanese) = maifun (Japanese) = mee fun (Chinese) = pancit bijon
    (Tagalog) = pancit bihon (Tagalog) = bijon (Tagalog) = bihon (Tagalog) =
    bihoon (Tagalog) = banh hoi (Vietnamese) = bee hoon (Malay) = beehoon
    (Malay) Notes: These are used throughout Asian in soups, spring rolls,
    cold salads, and stir-fries. They're similar to bean threads, only they're
    longer and made with rice flour instead of mung bean starch. Before using,
    soak the dried noodles in hot water until they're soft (about 15 minutes),
    then boil them briefly (from 1 to 3 minutes) and rinse with hot water. You
    can also deep-fry the dried noodles until they're crunchy and then use them
    in Chinese chicken salad, or as a garnish or bed for sauces.
    Substitutes: thin rice sticks OR bean threads OR flat rice noodles (wider)
    OR vermicelli
     
  3. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice

    vermicelli
    > (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in

    Lipton
    > chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked

    the
    > noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full

    of
    > meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    > centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.
    >
    > Can't remember what I bought these for originally, but I know what
    > *not* to use them for in the future. I guess they're really meant

    for
    > soup.
    >
    > June


    Actually you soaked them way too long. I don't know the Oriental name
    but those very thin rice noodles (probably many varieties) but they can
    either be soaked until just soft (2-3 minutes? and used cold as for a
    salad, no cooking)or cook by placing in a colander and dipping into hot
    water very briefly (like 20 seconds) to barely soften and then can be
    stir fried or placed into a soup at serving. They can also be deep
    fried straight from the package, whereas they will *instantly* puff for
    use as an edible garnish. There are very few procedures in Oriental
    cooking requiring more than 3 minutes, anytime you encounter some
    procedure lasting longer become vely, vely suspicious.

    Sheldon
     
  4. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice vermicelli
    > (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in Lipton
    > chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked the
    > noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full of
    > meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    > centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.
    >
    > Can't remember what I bought these for originally, but I know what
    > *not* to use them for in the future. I guess they're really meant for
    > soup.
    >

    Most of the japchae (or chap chae, depending on who does the
    translating) I've had used cellophane noodles. They're more resilient
    than rice vermicelli. Our experience with rice noodles has been all
    over the map. The very thin ones aren't good for much beyond soup,
    because they congeal into a single mass when drained. Even the ribbons
    (pad thai noodles) have that quality. The ones that seem to work the
    best for me are the ones that are as thick as spaghetti. Often these
    are designated as noodles for bun bo Hue.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  5. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 16:19:24 GMT, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice vermicelli
    >> (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in Lipton
    >> chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked the
    >> noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full of
    >> meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    >> centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.
    >>
    >> Can't remember what I bought these for originally, but I know what
    >> *not* to use them for in the future. I guess they're really meant for
    >> soup.
    >>
    >> June

    >
    >I thnk you skipped a step before frying.
    >
    >rice vermicelli = sen mee (Thai) = mi fen (Chinese) = mei fun (Chinese) =
    >mai fun (Japanese) = maifun (Japanese) = mee fun (Chinese) = pancit bijon
    >(Tagalog) = pancit bihon (Tagalog) = bijon (Tagalog) = bihon (Tagalog) =
    >bihoon (Tagalog) = banh hoi (Vietnamese) = bee hoon (Malay) = beehoon
    >(Malay) Notes: These are used throughout Asian in soups, spring rolls,


    chapchae (Korean) = rubber bands (English) ;>

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice vermicelli
    > (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in Lipton
    > chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked the
    > noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full of
    > meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    > centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.
    >
    > Can't remember what I bought these for originally, but I know what
    > *not* to use them for in the future. I guess they're really meant for
    > soup.
    >
    > June
    >


    I'll bet if you'd actually cooked them first they would have been fine.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  7. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice vermicelli
    > (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in Lipton
    > chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked the
    > noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full of
    > meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    > centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.
    >
    > Can't remember what I bought these for originally, but I know what
    > *not* to use them for in the future. I guess they're really meant for
    > soup.
    >
    > June
    >

    I always use bean threads or rice threads for this.
    Goomba
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Last night, I made some japchae with a package of dried rice vermicelli
    > > (very thin strands - like the thickness of noodles that come in Lipton
    > > chicken noodle soup pouches) that I had in the cupboard. I soaked the
    > > noodles in hot water for 15 min and then added them to the pan full of
    > > meat and veggies, whereupon they broke apart into tiny pieces about a
    > > centimeter long after I stirred it around for a few minutes.
    > > June


    > I'll bet if you'd actually cooked them first they would have been fine.


    I take it back -- I missed the part about them being rice noodles --
    maybe my idea wouldn't be so swell for them.
    -B
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  9. On 24 Mar 2005 08:22:32 -0800, Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Actually you soaked them way too long. I don't know the Oriental name
    > but those very thin rice noodles (probably many varieties) but they can
    > either be soaked until just soft (2-3 minutes? and used cold as for a
    > salad, no cooking)or cook by placing in a colander and dipping into hot
    > water very briefly (like 20 seconds) to barely soften and then can be
    > stir fried or placed into a soup at serving. They can also be deep
    > fried straight from the package, whereas they will *instantly* puff for
    > use as an edible garnish.


    I have no quarrel with the above, but...

    >There are very few procedures in Oriental
    > cooking requiring more than 3 minutes, anytime you encounter some
    > procedure lasting longer become vely, vely suspicious.


    WTF? Don't be ridiculous, there's plenty of procedures in
    Asian cooking that take longer than 3 minutes. The most obvious would
    be the preparation and cooking of rice. A proper beef rendang may take hours
    in cooking time along, never mind prep work. Curries, braised meat dishes,
    soups, claypot dishes, roast duck/pork/chicken, etc. (all of which can be
    found in various Asian countries) will all take longer than 3 minutes. A
    person _could_ be suspicious of all those things, but that would make them
    paranoid as well as ignorant-- not a good combination, in my book. :p

    If you don't actually know much about Asian cooking, one wonders why you'd
    choose to make such a ludicrously authoritative comment on the subject instead
    of sticking to what you do know.


    Ariane
    --
    Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
    relationships is you.
    http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html
     
  10. aem

    aem Guest

    Ariane Jenkins wrote:
    > On 24 Mar 2005 08:22:32 -0800, Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > [snip] There are very few procedures in Oriental
    > > cooking requiring more than 3 minutes, anytime you encounter some
    > > procedure lasting longer become vely, vely suspicious.

    >
    > WTF? Don't be ridiculous, there's plenty of procedures in
    > Asian cooking that take longer than 3 minutes. The most obvious
    > would be the preparation and cooking of rice. A proper beef
    > rendang may take hours in cooking time along, never mind prep work.
    > Curries, braised meat dishes, soups, claypot dishes, roast duck/pork
    > /chicken, etc. (all of which can be found in various Asian countries)
    > will all take longer than 3 minutes. [snip]


    Not to mention Peking Duck and tea smoked duck.
    >
    > If you don't actually know much about Asian cooking, one wonders
    > why you'd choose to make such a ludicrously authoritative comment on
    > the subject instead of sticking to what you do know.
    >

    Same reason he can't spell 'very' correctly. Stereotypes and
    conclusions reached decades ago fill the cranial cavity to the
    exclusion of new knowledge. -aem
     
  11. On 24 Mar 2005 16:34:19 -0800, aem <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Not to mention Peking Duck and tea smoked duck.


    Mmmm, yes. Can't forget those. :)~

    >> If you don't actually know much about Asian cooking, one wonders
    >> why you'd choose to make such a ludicrously authoritative comment on
    >> the subject instead of sticking to what you do know.
    >>

    > Same reason he can't spell 'very' correctly. Stereotypes and
    > conclusions reached decades ago fill the cranial cavity to the
    > exclusion of new knowledge. -aem


    LOL, you're probably right. But in general, I have noticed on
    occasion that some people enjoy making pronouncements on subjects, not
    deterred in the slightest by lack of knowledge. I'd think being wrong
    (repeatedly) would be embarrassing, but that's me. It obviously
    doesn't bother everyone...

    Ariane
    --
    Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
    relationships is you.
    http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html
     
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