someone help me out?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by i'm thirsty, Jun 30, 2003.

  1. i'm thirsty

    i'm thirsty New Member

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    i'm new to cycling - i've been a competitive runner for 2 years and recently started cycling as cross training, but i've come to like it. so now i'm checking out new bikes... i'm lost as to what i should buy and know some of the bike shop guys are trying to con me into bikes that cost more than they're worth. after all, some of the specialty running shoe stores tried the same thing with running shoes.

    i'm looking at a hybrid bike with more of a focus towards the roads but one that is still tough on the trails (i've already had several very close encounters on the roads). i also don't have much money to blow on upgrades, etc. so i guess my question is... what type of bike $600 or lower would you guys suggest for someone who is starting out? any model suggestions, etc. would be appreciated. ideally, one with quick shift gears, too. i'm somewhere between 65-80 mpw (which i know is low compared to many), but i desperately need a bike.

    thanks a lot.
     
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  2. stubacca

    stubacca New Member

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    What sort of trails are you talking about here? City bike paths or offroad-style gravel trails?

    Hybrids aren't a bad choice if you mostly ride on city bike paths - I've owned one for about 5 years now (Giant Farrago), and it's been great for commuting and a bit of exercise. However any rides on gravel paths have been frustrating to say the least. The 700 x 38 tires just aren't up to it, hence I bought a mountain bike last week! I'm also saving up for a new road bike for weekend and fitness rides, but will likely keep the hybrid for commuting. I don't regret buying the hybrid, but I'm not entirely sure I'd buy it again given the same situation.

    If you really do need one bike to do it all including gravel trails, I'd recommend buying a decent entry-level mountain bike e.g. Trek 4900/Specialized Rockhopper/Giant Iguana (all around $500) and change out the tires for some slicks. That way you'll have a bike that can cruise comfortably on the local paths, and you'll still own the MTB tires - with a bit of practice, you'll be able to switch tires in about 15 minutes if you know you'll be hitting some rougher stuff on the weekends! There are also some great tires out there that will happily do road and off-road for you.

    If you're just riding paved paths, try out the different hybrids and comfort road bikes such as theSpecialized Sirrus or Trek 1000c and see what has the best geometry for you. Most road bikes in this price range will have very entry level components, which might make it a bit tricky later on if you decide to upgrade. Decent bike shops will let you take any bike you like on a test ride around the parking lot. If they won't, find another bike shop!
     
  3. i'm thirsty

    i'm thirsty New Member

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    i'm not sure if you've heard of it, but i live next to fremont older open space preserve, which is a hilly dirt trail that gets pretty bumpy in some places and ocassionally rocky. on the roads, i primarily bike on city bike lanes along residential roads with moderate traffic as well as the bike lane along highway 9. i tend to go along at a pretty good clip, so i obviously won't be riding a wal-mart bike.
     
  4. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

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    Hybrids aren't good on the road, or off the road. I'd get an MTB with slicks, and change it to knobbies wen you hit the dirt.
     
  5. late

    late New Member

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    Hi,
    your library can borrow (from another library) the book 'Effective Cycling' by J Forester. It will help a lot.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...103-3094328-7950208?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

    Next, the other guys are basically right. Hybrids are designed for casual riding, and are not very good in the dirt. Mtb's are great in the dirt, but feel like they have superglue on the tires when you hit the road. Road bikes just scream on the road, but suck in the dirt.
    But....there are options. The best one is a cyclocross bike. Here is a good example of the breed......

    http://www.roadbikereview.com/Cyclo...es,2000,Jake,the,Snake/PRD_23681_1604crx.aspx

    Designed to race on the dirt, AND on the road, they are reasonably competent at both. get a spare set of wheels ( or get good at changing tires) and you can fly down dirt roads on the weekend, and then ride with roadies on a club ride during the week.
     
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