Somewhat older guy wanting to get into cycling!

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Mulligan Al, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. Mulligan Al

    Mulligan Al New Member

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    I just turned 47 and I'm beginning to realize that the wear-and-tear of inline skating is starting to take its toll on the old bones. There are a lot of cycling groups around the area here in Atlanta, and since I've always wanted to get into cycling, I've finally realized that this may be the right time.

    I'd like to get a nice bike, one that I don't have to trade up on for some time go come (if ever). I'll be riding on the streets mostly and in Stone Mountain Park which is a very large park here in Georgia.

    My question is for under $3,000 what should I be looking for in a bike and what are some of the pros and cons I may need to know if I start looking at frames made by Colnago, Cannondale, Felt, Specialized, Trek, Look, Orbea, BMC or Cervelo to name a few?

    Thanks in advance for any help, this is a great site.
     
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  2. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Give me four choices and I give you five opinions on frames. Most important is fit and comfort.
    I have ridden Look,Cannondale,Trek and all have some some things I liked. I ride a Fondriest at present but really like the looks of the Orbea also.
    Pick the right sized frame in a color you like with the right saddle and good components,which is also a matter of opinion.
    I have all Duras Ace at present but there are other good components.
    Given your age and area I would recommend either a triple crank or a double with a 12/25 or 12/27 rear cassette since I believe your have some pretty good climbs so be kind to the knees.
    Get some good bibs,tool kit,water bottle,some good shoes,a couple of power bars and your are ready.
    Early to bed,eartly to rise ,train like hell and tell big lies..
    Bottom line = Shop and demo as much equipment as possible as everybody varies in their taste and requirements get someone with knowledge to fit you on a frame.
    Buy good stuff but your don't need top of the line especially until your find your zone.
    Good luck and don't forget to wear your helmet.
     
  3. Mulligan Al

    Mulligan Al New Member

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    Thanks so much, especially for the info on the crank. My knees sure do need some special attention and part of the reason I'd like to get into cycling is to strengthen them. I need to offset all those years of football abuse.:eek:
     
  4. lwedge

    lwedge New Member

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    JHuskey said it all and please follow his advice. I'm just adding a little salt and pepper. Felt and Specialized are going to be stiff sprint syle frames in that price range and Cervelo in my opinion and several cycle mag reviews rate the frames as the best out there.... but you are stuck with the seatposts unless you go with the R3 or Bayonne (cross bike).

    I have never had the pleasure of using anything that is Campagnolo but from the reviews I've read, I (this is my opinion) don't think the components are worth the extra $$$ for the bling. I would stick with Ultegra or Dura Ace. One of the items I would spend a little money on would be a good set of wheels....

    Tour day Georgia next week baby !
     
  5. Cyclesafe

    Cyclesafe New Member

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    47 is not old.

    Buy a bike that won't be fighting back. If you can spend $3000, buy carbon or titanium, Ultegra components (a triple is nice), and good wheels. Models from each of the brands you mentioned have these and more. Finally, buy on sale.
     
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