Sora vs. Tiagra

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Viatl Info, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. Viatl Info

    Viatl Info Guest

    Greetings,

    I am only interested in getting a decent workout, do you guys
    think Tiagra components offer advantages over Sora? I do not
    think 8- and 9-speed are that different. I am new to this and
    do not want to spend much, but if Tiagra does give better
    performance (what is performance anyway? :), I do not mind
    paying more.

    For example, between the Giant OCR 3 and OCR 2... What is the
    big deal?

    Thanks.

    -MK
     
    Tags:


  2. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On 29 Aug 2004 16:13:02 -0700, [email protected] (Viatl Info) wrote:

    >Greetings,
    >
    >I am only interested in getting a decent workout, do you guys
    >think Tiagra components offer advantages over Sora? I do not
    >think 8- and 9-speed are that different. I am new to this and
    >do not want to spend much, but if Tiagra does give better
    >performance (what is performance anyway? :), I do not mind
    >paying more.
    >
    >For example, between the Giant OCR 3 and OCR 2... What is the
    >big deal?
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >-MK


    Hi, there are numerous differences, between the two, but seeing as the
    norm is becoming 10 speed, 8 speed will be much more limiting. With
    the 9 speed Tiagra, you will have many more options for upgrades and
    regular maintenance. A good example is chains, there are more varities
    of 9 speed chain, in more price ranges. Cassettes in 9 are available
    in many price ranges from, I believe Hg-50 all the way to Dura-Ace,
    there are also other brands that will work with 9-speed. It is mainly
    that your options are greater.

    One other consideration is that the shifters are different, the
    Tiagras are the same style as all Shimano 9 speed, while the Sora
    brifters are the only model configured that way, by Shimano.

    As far as performance goes,that may be subjective. There are two
    options 9 will allow, a wider gear range or a tighter one. Both have
    their advantages.

    Go with the Tiagra, if you become serious about biking, you will be
    glad you did.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  3. BanditManDan

    BanditManDan New Member

    Joined:
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    I agree, Tiagra is mostly better because of the upgrade path. To upgrade a bike with Sora components can be cost prohibitive. If you only looking for a workout and nothing more, Sora will be fine. Using a triple chainring will give you plenty of gears to choose from. However, if you ever decide to start racing you'll be better off with Tiagra or higher. The upgrade path is easier and the shifters make's a big difference in racing.

    Dan.
     
  4. Viatl Info

    Viatl Info Guest

    Thanks.

    I may not want to upgrade. Not a big fan of over-engineering.

    However, if Sora is on the way out, and availability could be an issue,
    I would avoid it.

    BanditManDan <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Jeff Starr Wrote:
    > > Hi, there are numerous differences, between the two, but seeing as the
    > > norm is becoming 10 speed, 8 speed will be much more limiting. With
    > > the 9 speed Tiagra, you will have many more options for upgrades and
    > > regular maintenance. A good example is chains, there are more varities
    > > of 9 speed chain, in more price ranges. Cassettes in 9 are available
    > > in many price ranges from, I believe Hg-50 all the way to Dura-Ace,
    > > there are also other brands that will work with 9-speed. It is mainly
    > > that your options are greater.
    > >
    > > One other consideration is that the shifters are different, the
    > > Tiagras are the same style as all Shimano 9 speed, while the Sora
    > > brifters are the only model configured that way, by Shimano.
    > >
    > > As far as performance goes,that may be subjective. There are two
    > > options 9 will allow, a wider gear range or a tighter one. Both have
    > > their advantages.
    > >
    > > Go with the Tiagra, if you become serious about biking, you will be
    > > glad you did.
    > >
    > >
    > > Life is Good!
    > > Jeff

    >
    > I agree, Tiagra is mostly better because of the upgrade path. To
    > upgrade a bike with Sora components can be cost prohibitive. If you
    > only looking for a workout and nothing more, Sora will be fine. Using
    > a triple chainring will give you plenty of gears to choose from.
    > However, if you ever decide to start racing you'll be better off with
    > Tiagra or higher. The upgrade path is easier and the shifters make's a
    > big difference in racing.
    >
    > Dan.
     
  5. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On 30 Aug 2004 13:40:36 -0700, [email protected] (Viatl Info) wrote:

    >Thanks.
    >
    >I may not want to upgrade. Not a big fan of over-engineering.
    >
    >However, if Sora is on the way out, and availability could be an issue,
    >I would avoid it.


    My understanding is get the best you can afford on the initial purchase,
    b/c in the long run you spend more trying to upgrade - IOW it's not really
    worth it to upgrade.

    You can get past some of this if you take your time and ride several bikes
    and make sure you know the options, and fit you want. Some ppl probably buy
    too soon and then realize a month later they should have gotten something
    else.

    Check out the bar shifters on those two and see if one is noticeably
    smoother or whatever. The better shifters may be more durable, shift more
    postively for your taste.

    -B


    >
    >BanditManDan <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Jeff Starr Wrote:
    >> > Hi, there are numerous differences, between the two, but seeing as the
    >> > norm is becoming 10 speed, 8 speed will be much more limiting. With
    >> > the 9 speed Tiagra, you will have many more options for upgrades and
    >> > regular maintenance. A good example is chains, there are more varities
    >> > of 9 speed chain, in more price ranges. Cassettes in 9 are available
    >> > in many price ranges from, I believe Hg-50 all the way to Dura-Ace,
    >> > there are also other brands that will work with 9-speed. It is mainly
    >> > that your options are greater.
    >> >
    >> > One other consideration is that the shifters are different, the
    >> > Tiagras are the same style as all Shimano 9 speed, while the Sora
    >> > brifters are the only model configured that way, by Shimano.
    >> >
    >> > As far as performance goes,that may be subjective. There are two
    >> > options 9 will allow, a wider gear range or a tighter one. Both have
    >> > their advantages.
    >> >
    >> > Go with the Tiagra, if you become serious about biking, you will be
    >> > glad you did.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Life is Good!
    >> > Jeff

    >>
    >> I agree, Tiagra is mostly better because of the upgrade path. To
    >> upgrade a bike with Sora components can be cost prohibitive. If you
    >> only looking for a workout and nothing more, Sora will be fine. Using
    >> a triple chainring will give you plenty of gears to choose from.
    >> However, if you ever decide to start racing you'll be better off with
    >> Tiagra or higher. The upgrade path is easier and the shifters make's a
    >> big difference in racing.
    >>
    >> Dan.
     
  6. Context lost to top-posting. Sigh.

    On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 14:40:36 -0700, Viatl Info wrote:

    > Thanks.
    >
    > I may not want to upgrade. Not a big fan of over-engineering.
    >
    > However, if Sora is on the way out, and availability could be an issue,
    > I would avoid it.


    For not much more money, you could also do 105, which will
    supposedly last longer than Tiagra. Replace your chains on time, and
    you should get more miles out of 105 components than out of Tiagra.

    The next step up is Ultegra, which is looking to be the sweet spot
    now that Dura $pend is the new top-of-the-line.

    --
    Chris BeHanna
    Software Engineer (Remove "allspammersmustdie" before responding.)
    [email protected]
    I was raised by a pack of wild corn dogs.
     
  7. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 07:30:31 GMT, Chris BeHanna
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >
    > For not much more money, you could also do 105, which will
    >supposedly last longer than Tiagra. Replace your chains on time, and
    >you should get more miles out of 105 components than out of Tiagra.

    Why is this, what do you base these claims on? What will fail on
    Tiagra, that will keep going on 105?


    >
    > The next step up is Ultegra, which is looking to be the sweet spot
    >now that Dura $pend is the new top-of-the-line.


    I'm no expert on Shimano, but hasn't Dura-Ace been Shimano's
    "top-of-the-line" for many years?

    We have an OP who isn't sure he wants to step up from 8-speed Sora to
    9-sspeed Tiagra. Depending upon his frame size requirement, if he
    happens to be on one of the extremes, he may find a closeout bike that
    would make 105 worth considering. Otherwise, benefits like lighter
    weight and better finish, won't be of much interest.

    To the OP, I would say that, even though upgrading seems like
    something you would not do, that may change. Three years ago, I was
    content on a then 25 year old bike. Then I found that I loved riding.
    I got a mostly Tiagra equiped LeMond. I choose the LeMond because of
    its steel frame, with the components being secondary to choice of
    frame
    Afterabout 1200 miles,and although unnecessary, I upgraded the
    components to mostly Dura-Ace 9-speed triple.
    I replaced the bars and seatpost with Easton carbon fiber. I had a
    set of wheels hand built by Peter at Vecchio's. I wanted the best
    bike, that I could afford, that was built up of parts of my own
    choosing. I did the work myself, which taught me a lot and made the
    bike even more my own. . I should mention, that besides Dura-Ace being
    the lightest,most refined, it also has the best warranty.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  8. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 07:30:31 GMT, Chris BeHanna
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >
    > For not much more money, you could also do 105, which will
    >supposedly last longer than Tiagra. Replace your chains on time, and
    >you should get more miles out of 105 components than out of Tiagra.

    Why is this, what do you base these claims on? What will fail on
    Tiagra, that will keep going on 105?


    >
    > The next step up is Ultegra, which is looking to be the sweet spot
    >now that Dura $pend is the new top-of-the-line.


    I'm no expert on Shimano, but hasn't Dura-Ace been Shimano's
    "top-of-the-line" for many years?

    We have an OP who isn't sure he wants to step up from 8-speed Sora to
    9-sspeed Tiagra. Depending upon his frame size requirement, if he
    happens to be on one of the extremes, he may find a closeout bike that
    would make 105 worth considering. Otherwise, benefits like lighter
    weight and better finish, won't be of much interest.

    To the OP, I would say that, even though upgrading seems like
    something you would not do, that may change. Three years ago, I was
    content on a then 25 year old bike. Then I found that I loved riding.
    I got a mostly Tiagra equiped LeMond. I choose the LeMond because of
    its steel frame, with the components being secondary to choice of
    frame
    Afterabout 1200 miles,and although unnecessary, I upgraded the
    components to mostly Dura-Ace 9-speed triple.
    I replaced the bars and seatpost with Easton carbon fiber. I had a
    set of wheels hand built by Peter at Vecchio's. I wanted the best
    bike, that I could afford, that was built up of parts of my own
    choosing. I did the work myself, which taught me a lot and made the
    bike even more my own. . I should mention, that besides Dura-Ace being
    the lightest,most refined, it also has the best warranty.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  9. RichC

    RichC Guest

    [email protected] (Viatl Info) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thanks.
    >
    > I may not want to upgrade. Not a big fan of over-engineering.


    It's not so much a matter of over-engineering as it is one of cost of
    replacement parts vs cost of component groups sold as part of a new
    bike.

    The most expensive replacement part - the shifters - are also the part
    (along with the rear derailleur) that's reputed to wear out faster in
    the Sora line than in the higher models. (My personal experience bears
    this out, as does other anecdotal evidence, but I doubt there's a
    statistical source for this.)

    You can pay $120-140 for replacement Sora shifters. 105 shifters are
    only $40-60 more. 105s are a direct replacement for Tiagra, but not
    for Sora.

    Even assuming you are handy enough to replace your own shifters, when
    the time comes to replace the Soras you'll be faced with paying a lot
    for a new set of low-end-shifters when, had you started with Tiagra,
    you could now pay a little bit more for much better ones -- and if
    you're paying for the labor, it's even more painful, because the
    installation costs are the same either way. Plus, you're doing it
    sooner because the Sora shifters wore out sooner.

    There's nothing wrong with Sora for an entry level bike, but I
    wouldn't recommend it for anyone who plans to keep a bike a long time
    and/or ride a lot of miles. You can save money and get a better bike
    in the long run by moving up the line on your initial purchase.
    Personally, I think 105 represents the "sweet spot" -- maximum
    price/performance ratio -- in Shimano's line. A good 105 bike, which
    can often be fount for $900 or so, can be a bike with no real
    weaknesses and no noticeable compromises.

    > However, if Sora is on the way out, and availability could be an issue,
    > I would avoid it.


    I don't think parts availability, per se, is really an issue. You can
    find parts for almost any bike, and replacement for mainstream Shimano
    components will remain available for decades. But they won't
    necessarily be cheap.

    RichC
     
  10. On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 10:06:56 -0500, Jeff Starr wrote:

    > On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 07:30:31 GMT, Chris BeHanna
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> For not much more money, you could also do 105, which will
    >>supposedly last longer than Tiagra. Replace your chains on time, and
    >>you should get more miles out of 105 components than out of Tiagra.

    >
    > Why is this, what do you base these claims on? What will fail on
    > Tiagra, that will keep going on 105?


    Brifters, according to my LBS.

    --
    Chris BeHanna
    Software Engineer (Remove "allspammersmustdie" before responding.)
    [email protected]
    I was raised by a pack of wild corn dogs.
     
  11. Viatl Info <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I am only interested in getting a decent workout, do you guys
    > think Tiagra components offer advantages over Sora? I do not


    Aside from the obvious 8 vs. 9 issue, you might want to give the
    shifters a try, in case you clearly prefer one model over another.

    Sheldon had some nice things to say about Sora. Here's some reading for
    you:

    <http://groups.google.ca/groups?th=258e268eb204a862>
    <http://groups.google.ca/groups?th=2c280d90b19d7e54>
    <http://groups.google.ca/groups?selm=rcousine-056F3A.01520502082003%40morgoth.sfu.ca>

    > do not want to spend much, but if Tiagra does give better
    > performance (what is performance anyway? :), I do not mind


    Good luck figuring that out.

    Wisdom dictates that as you move to a higher group, components will be
    lighter and/or last longer and/or be easier to adjust and/or require
    less fiddling over time and/or just plain work better. Unfortunately, I
    have yet to see an objective comparison between Shimano's various
    groups, aside from the usual "my bike is all Ultegra cuz Tiagra sucks"
    rants. And Shimano's marketspeak doesn't help one bit on that matter.
    (You'd think they would at least *try* to justify spending more money
    on, say, Ultegra.)


    --
    Frederic Briere <*> [email protected]

    => <[email protected]> IS NO MORE: <http://www.abacomsucks.com> <=
     
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