Sore cheeks when swimming

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by John Schreiber, Dec 11, 2003.

  1. I am a recreational/fitness swimmer and when I swim for more than about 30 minutes my cheeks
    sometimes get sore. The pain is near the hinge of my jaw, back almost by the ear. To describe what
    I'm talking about . . . have you ever tried to imitate the sound of a squirrel by pinching air in
    your cheeks and making a squeaking noise? It almost feels like I'm forcing air somewhere it
    shouldn't go.

    If I stand up, the pain mostly goes away. Rubbing the area seems to help. As soon as I start
    swimming again, it comes back. Sometimes it's not so bad and I can swim through it, other times it's
    too much. As I'm swimming more, it seems like it's getting worse.

    Any ideas?

    NOTE: Google the groups for the above subject line and most of what you get won't relate to swimming
    (I learn new things every day).
     
    Tags:


  2. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On 11 Dec 2003 15:21:49 -0800,
    [email protected] (John Schreiber) wrote:

    >Any ideas?

    Do you grit your teeth or clench your jaw while swimming?

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  3. DaKitty

    DaKitty Guest

    our coach just posted a 'breathing tip' on our team website:
    http://mastersmvnswim.org/

    Don't gasp or Blow! Breath control is fundamental to efficient swimming. You need to train your
    breathing for effective performance. Important Breathing Tips: -Inhalation: Should be an easy reflex
    action - don't gasp in air! If exhalation is adequate, air will flow in on its own! -Exhalation:
    Always flow the air out easily. Never blow the air out forcefully, because this causes
    breathlessness and loss of breathing control resulting in premature fatigue. Exhalation should be at
    least twice as long as the inward breath

    "John Schreiber" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am a recreational/fitness swimmer and when I swim for more than about 30 minutes my cheeks
    > sometimes get sore. The pain is near the hinge of my jaw, back almost by the ear. To describe what
    > I'm talking about . . . have you ever tried to imitate the sound of a squirrel by pinching air in
    > your cheeks and making a squeaking noise? It almost feels like I'm forcing air somewhere it
    > shouldn't go.
    >
    > If I stand up, the pain mostly goes away. Rubbing the area seems to help. As soon as I start
    > swimming again, it comes back. Sometimes it's not so bad and I can swim through it, other times
    > it's too much. As I'm swimming more, it seems like it's getting worse.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    >
    > NOTE: Google the groups for the above subject line and most of what you get won't relate to
    > swimming (I learn new things every day).
     
  4. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Don't gasp or Blow! Breath control is fundamental to efficient swimming. You need to train
    your
    > breathing for effective performance. Important Breathing Tips: -Inhalation: Should be an easy
    > reflex action - don't gasp in air! If exhalation is adequate, air will flow in on its own! -
    > Exhalation: Always flow the air out easily. Never blow the air out forcefully, because this causes
    > breathlessness and loss of breathing
    control
    > resulting in premature fatigue. Exhalation should be at least twice as
    long
    > as the inward breath

    who taught you this?
     
  5. M.W. Smith

    M.W. Smith Guest

    diablo wrote:

    > "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>Don't gasp or Blow! Breath control is fundamental to efficient swimming. You need to train
    >
    > your
    >
    >>breathing for effective performance. Important Breathing Tips: -Inhalation: Should be an easy
    >>reflex action - don't gasp in air! If exhalation is adequate, air will flow in on its own! -
    >>Exhalation: Always flow the air out easily. Never blow the air out forcefully, because this causes
    >>breathlessness and loss of breathing
    >
    > control
    >
    >>resulting in premature fatigue. Exhalation should be at least twice as
    >
    > long
    >
    >>as the inward breath
    >
    >
    > who taught you this?

    Yeah, if I don't blow the air out with some force, I don't get it all out and then I don't get
    enough new air.
     
  6. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    "M.W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > > who taught you this?
    >
    > Yeah, if I don't blow the air out with some force, I don't get it all out and then I don't get
    > enough new air.
    >

    Forceful breathing is essential in conditioning the intercostal muscles. Its effective the point
    that some company is pushing some ventilation-training device..i remember seeing it at the ASCA
    conference..
     
  7. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    John Schreiber wrote:
    > I am a recreational/fitness swimmer and when I swim for more than about 30 minutes my cheeks
    > sometimes get sore. The pain is near the hinge of my jaw, back almost by the ear. To describe what
    > I'm talking about . . . have you ever tried to imitate the sound of a squirrel by pinching air in
    > your cheeks and making a squeaking noise? It almost feels like I'm forcing air somewhere it
    > shouldn't go.
    >
    > If I stand up, the pain mostly goes away. Rubbing the area seems to help. As soon as I start
    > swimming again, it comes back. Sometimes it's not so bad and I can swim through it, other times
    > it's too much. As I'm swimming more, it seems like it's getting worse.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    >
    > NOTE: Google the groups for the above subject line and most of what you get won't relate to
    > swimming (I learn new things every day).

    This could also be referred pain from a bad tooth or from your ears, and the change in body position
    makes it more evident. If it is a tooth or TMJ, your dentist can make the diagnosis.

    You might be blowing too hard or doing some other little habit that is making this happen. Do you
    twist your lips out of the water? Is it the same on both sides? Madelaine
     
  8. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > John Schreiber wrote:
    > > I am a recreational/fitness swimmer and when I swim for more than about 30 minutes my cheeks
    > > sometimes get sore. The pain is near the hinge of my jaw, back almost by the ear. To describe
    > > what I'm talking about . . . have you ever tried to imitate the sound of a squirrel by pinching
    > > air in your cheeks and making a squeaking noise? It almost feels like I'm forcing air somewhere
    > > it shouldn't go.

    I am wondering if your jaw is tilting sideway when you open your mouth to breathe. A few years ago,
    I got hit in the face with a soccer ball and it forced my jaw out of the socket at the hinge (just
    for a second or two). Since then, I have to do exercises to get it to 'track' right and those
    exercises include pushing it sideways and holding it there for a few seconds. When I bite down on
    food sometimes, my jaw will go out of alignment. It is like having an articulated jaw....Anyway, if
    your jaw is going sideways, that could cause the pain at the TMJ area. It wasn't designed to flex
    that direction too much, after all.

    Pat in TX
     
  9. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > Forceful breathing is essential in conditioning the intercostal muscles.
    Its
    > effective the point that some company is pushing some ventilation-training device..i remember
    > seeing it at the ASCA conference..

    Was it this: http://www.roadrunnersports.com/cgi-bin/rrs/rrs/ProductPg.jsp?baseProdKey=RRPOW002&catOID=-
    8890&[email protected]@@@[email protected]@@@&BV_EngineID=fadcjdefgfhkbekgcgecfeedg.0 I asked my
    physical therapist if this would really help improve someone's lung power, and she said that it
    would be beneficial.

    Pat in TX
     
  10. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    thats the chap, the Powerlung. Was it Darren Mew who used it and endorses it? one of the brit
    breaststroke crew...

    "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >
    > > Forceful breathing is essential in conditioning the intercostal muscles.
    > Its
    > > effective the point that some company is pushing some
    ventilation-training
    > > device..i remember seeing it at the ASCA conference..
    >
    > Was it this:
    >
    http://www.roadrunnersports.com/cgi-bin/rrs/rrs/ProductPg.jsp?baseProdKey=RRPOW002&catOID=-
    8890&[email protected]@@@[email protected]@@@&BV_EngineID=fadcjdefgfhkbekgcgecfeedg.0
    > I asked my physical therapist if this would really help improve someone's lung power, and she said
    > that it would be beneficial.
    >
    > Pat in TX
     
  11. [email protected] (John Schreiber) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am a recreational/fitness swimmer and when I swim for more than about 30 minutes my cheeks
    > sometimes get sore. The pain is near the hinge of my jaw, back almost by the ear. To describe what
    > I'm talking about . . . have you ever tried to imitate the sound of a squirrel by pinching air in
    > your cheeks and making a squeaking noise? It almost feels like I'm forcing air somewhere it
    > shouldn't go.
    >
    > If I stand up, the pain mostly goes away. Rubbing the area seems to help. As soon as I start
    > swimming again, it comes back. Sometimes it's not so bad and I can swim through it, other times
    > it's too much. As I'm swimming more, it seems like it's getting worse.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >

    Thanks for all the suggestions.

    I'm not gritting or clenching my teeth. The pain is equal on both sides. I've been to the dentist
    recently with no problems reported. I don't think the problem is ear or sinus related because it
    doesn't change with depth or by doing hand suction on the ear.

    I do tend to exhale fairly forcefully just before I breathe. (Not massive force, but I am underwater
    after all.) I generally finish exhaling just as my mouth comes above the water. I will have to
    experiment to see if I can get enough air in and out with less force.

    Should I be exhaling through my nose or my mouth when swimming freestyle?

    It doesn't seem to me that my mouth is out of the water long enough for me to get enough air unless
    I inhale fairly vigorously. I find it hard to imagine exhaling smoothly so that when breathing in
    the air would just "flow in on its own".

    Thanks John Schreiber
     
  12. DaKitty

    DaKitty Guest

    "diablo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Don't gasp or Blow! Breath control is fundamental to efficient swimming. You need to train
    > your
    > > breathing for effective performance. Important Breathing Tips: -Inhalation: Should be an easy
    > > reflex action - don't gasp in air! If exhalation is adequate, air will flow in on its own! -
    > > Exhalation: Always flow the air out easily. Never blow the air out forcefully, because this
    > > causes breathlessness and loss of breathing
    > control
    > > resulting in premature fatigue. Exhalation should be at least twice as
    > long
    > > as the inward breath
    >
    > who taught you this?
    >

    I think I put in the intro of the post that it is coming from our coaches.

    The same one that got me to drop 8 seconds in 3 weeks on my 100m SCM sprint, and the same ones that
    have guys qualifying for the Olympic events.

    And a short note to other posters in this thread, since I don't feel like replying to individual
    posts... It seems to me some people here are confused about the terminology, and want to pick a good
    advice apart. Go ahead, rationalize it away. Your loss. Sorry I wasted my time sharing it with you.

    Yeah, there is a BIG difference between relaxed breathing, and breath control, vs. forceful
    belabored breathing that wastes energy, and doesn't give you the 'bang' for the effort.

    Something I noticed in this group, seems that people in here often confuse technique drills
    with swimming itself. I'm starting to find the bickering and misinformation in this group a
    waste of my time.
     
  13. DaKitty

    DaKitty Guest

    "M.W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > diablo wrote:
    >
    > > "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >
    > >>Don't gasp or Blow! Breath control is fundamental to efficient swimming. You need to train
    > >
    > > your
    > >
    > >>breathing for effective performance. Important Breathing Tips: -Inhalation: Should be an easy
    > >>reflex action - don't gasp in air! If exhalation is adequate, air will flow in on its own! -
    > >>Exhalation: Always flow the air out easily. Never blow the air out forcefully, because this
    > >>causes breathlessness and loss of breathing
    > >
    > > control
    > >
    > >>resulting in premature fatigue. Exhalation should be at least twice as
    > >
    > > long
    > >
    > >>as the inward breath
    > >
    > >
    > > who taught you this?
    >
    > Yeah, if I don't blow the air out with some force, I don't get it all out and then I don't get
    > enough new air.
    >

    Define "Force" ??? vs. Some Force? Oh, In my case, breathing comes naturally. I hardly have to
    strain myself to breathe, swimming or not. Maybe someday you too will learn how to breathe.
     
  14. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    all i asked was who taught you that. i didn't imply anything as to the value of the advice.

    my own personal opinion of breathing is that like anything it has to be trained. relaxed slow
    breathing has its place, but so does forceful inhalation and exhalation, regarding training the
    intercostal muscles and diaphragm.

    i'm sorry you think you're being attacked, then again if everyone agreed all the time, it'd be a
    pretty boring place. i think you're taking it a bit too personally, but if i've contributed to your
    obvious state of malcontent i apologise.

    "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > > who taught you this?
    > >
    >
    > I think I put in the intro of the post that it is coming from our coaches.
    >
    > The same one that got me to drop 8 seconds in 3 weeks on my 100m SCM
    sprint,
    > and the same ones that have guys qualifying for the Olympic events.
    >
    > And a short note to other posters in this thread, since I don't feel like replying to individual
    > posts... It seems to me some people here are confused about the terminology, and
    want
    > to pick a good advice apart. Go ahead, rationalize it away. Your loss.
    Sorry
    > I wasted my time sharing it with you.
    >
    > Yeah, there is a BIG difference between relaxed breathing, and breath control, vs. forceful
    > belabored breathing that wastes energy, and doesn't give you the 'bang' for the effort.
    >
    > Something I noticed in this group, seems that people in here often confuse technique drills with
    > swimming itself. I'm starting to find the bickering and misinformation in this group a waste of
    > my time.
     
  15. DaKitty

    DaKitty Guest

    "diablo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "M.W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > > who taught you this?
    > >
    > > Yeah, if I don't blow the air out with some force, I don't get it all out and then I don't get
    > > enough new air.
    > >
    >
    > Forceful breathing is essential in conditioning the intercostal muscles.
    Its
    > effective the point that some company is pushing some ventilation-training device..i remember
    > seeing it at the ASCA conference..
    >
    Does that mean one should be doing breathing conditioning drills while competing in a race? I
    hardly think so.
     
  16. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Oh, In my case, breathing comes naturally. I hardly have to strain myself
    to
    > breathe, swimming or not. Maybe someday you too will learn how to breathe.

    while i wasn't intending to upset you in any way, i'd like to point out theres a big difference
    between breathing, and effective breathing. Its been a pretty hot topic on another string.
     
  17. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > > Forceful breathing is essential in conditioning the intercostal muscles.
    > Its
    > > effective the point that some company is pushing some
    ventilation-training
    > > device..i remember seeing it at the ASCA conference..
    > >
    > Does that mean one should be doing breathing conditioning drills while competing in a race? I
    > hardly think so.

    who said anything about conditioning drills while racing? the point of conditioning is so when it
    comes to race time, you're in better shape than you were.
     
  18. DaKitty

    DaKitty Guest

    "diablo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > all i asked was who taught you that. i didn't imply anything as to the
    value
    > of the advice.
    >
    > my own personal opinion of breathing is that like anything it has to be trained. relaxed slow
    > breathing has its place, but so does forceful inhalation and exhalation, regarding training the
    > intercostal muscles and diaphragm.
    >
    > i'm sorry you think you're being attacked, then again if everyone agreed
    all
    > the time, it'd be a pretty boring place. i think you're taking it a bit
    too
    > personally, but if i've contributed to your obvious state of malcontent i apologise.

    no worries :)
     
  19. DaKitty

    DaKitty Guest

    "diablo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Oh, In my case, breathing comes naturally. I hardly have to strain
    myself
    > to
    > > breathe, swimming or not. Maybe someday you too will learn how to breathe.
    >
    > while i wasn't intending to upset you in any way, i'd like to point out theres a big difference
    > between breathing, and effective breathing. Its
    been
    > a pretty hot topic on another string.
    >
    No worries, it was not directed your way anyway.
     
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