Sore Knees...

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by McViegh, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. McViegh

    McViegh Guest

    Just wanted to make sure on the "rule of thumb"...

    Sore Knees - Raise the seat height

    Sore Ankles - Lower the seat height
     
    Tags:


  2. McViegh wrote:
    > Just wanted to make sure on the "rule of thumb"...


    > Sore Knees - Raise the seat height


    Usually raise the cadance. Never heard of an instance where sore knees were
    due to seat height, simply because no-one had their bike geometry _that_ bad
    for long enough to cause sore knees.

    > Sore Ankles - Lower the seat height


    Could mean anything from twisted foot to knees, bowed legs, who knows.

    See someone who specialises in the area of bike geometry. It seems your
    setup is so far off it needs serious modification.

    --
    Linux Registered User # 302622 <http://counter.li.org>
     
  3. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "McViegh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Just wanted to make sure on the "rule of thumb"...
    >
    > Sore Knees - Raise the seat height
    >
    > Sore Ankles - Lower the seat height
    >
    >



    I found lowering my seat helped prevent my knees from becoming sore. I
    guessed with the seat to high and using those shoes that clip in was causing
    my legs to stretch rather than just pedal.

    I am now getting sore wrists which I have tried silicon gloves and those
    horns on the handle bars so I can change grip and lower the RSI risk. This
    helps but I am always open to other suggestions.


    :p
     
  4. McViegh

    McViegh Guest

    "Peter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "McViegh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > > Just wanted to make sure on the "rule of thumb"...
    > >
    > > Sore Knees - Raise the seat height
    > >
    > > Sore Ankles - Lower the seat height
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > I found lowering my seat helped prevent my knees from becoming sore. I
    > guessed with the seat to high and using those shoes that clip in was

    causing
    > my legs to stretch rather than just pedal.
    >
    > I am now getting sore wrists which I have tried silicon gloves and those
    > horns on the handle bars so I can change grip and lower the RSI risk. This
    > helps but I am always open to other suggestions.
    >
    >
    > :p
    >
    >


    Thanks for your reply. But I'm a little bit cautious about taking the advice
    of someone that calls Bar Ends "horns".....lol
     
  5. twojaks

    twojaks Guest

    Too many variables here to say, I would look at seat height then the
    position of my knee over the pedal axle.
    Lack of stretching before and after exercise or micro trauma from heavy
    exertion may result in an muscular imbalance.

    - to check knee go to your LBS and ask them to check
    Or, run a plumb line from the "knob on the front of your knee, below your
    knee cap. to the pedal axle when siting on the bike and with the pedals at
    the horizontal position. Be sure to be on a flat surface and please hold on
    to something - or you'll fall over ;-)

    Saddle too far forward or back can make for significant leverage strain on
    the knee and voila knee pain.

    Failing that, see your GP or a qualified soft tissue injury specialist

    MJ



    "McViegh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Just wanted to make sure on the "rule of thumb"...
    >
    > Sore Knees - Raise the seat height
    >
    > Sore Ankles - Lower the seat height
    >
    >
    >
     
  6. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "McViegh" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Just wanted to make sure on the "rule of thumb"...
    >
    > Sore Knees - Raise the seat height
    >
    > Sore Ankles - Lower the seat height


    In the UK at least, the rule of thumb was "sore knee caps - raise the seat.
    sore behind the knees, lower the seat" (or maybe it was the other way
    around). However, as others have said, it is rarely that simple and such
    pain could be caused by a number of factors.


    Graeme
     
  7. McViegh

    McViegh Guest

    "twojaks" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Too many variables here to say, I would look at seat height then the
    > position of my knee over the pedal axle.
    > Lack of stretching before and after exercise or micro trauma from heavy
    > exertion may result in an muscular imbalance.
    >
    > - to check knee go to your LBS and ask them to check
    > Or, run a plumb line from the "knob on the front of your knee, below

    your
    > knee cap. to the pedal axle when siting on the bike and with the pedals at
    > the horizontal position. Be sure to be on a flat surface and please hold

    on
    > to something - or you'll fall over ;-)
    >
    > Saddle too far forward or back can make for significant leverage strain

    on
    > the knee and voila knee pain.
    >
    > Failing that, see your GP or a qualified soft tissue injury specialist
    >
    > MJ
    >
    >
    >


    Thanks for your reply. Sounds like I better get down to my LBS! :)
     
  8. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum Guest

    wrote:
    > Thanks for your reply. Sounds like I better get down to my LBS! :)



    It's true that the biomechanics of injury on a bike are prett
    complicated, and it's difficult to get good advice from a rule of thumb
    but I'd say by the same token to be wary of the LBS for the same reason
    A lot of them have staff who aren't experts in injury mechanism o
    correct setup (naturally... they are salespeople or mechanics). They ar
    often able to do a 'close enough' setup that feels comfortable to star
    of with, but this isn't good enough if you ride at high volume (seriou
    roadies, MTB), very high stress/force/torsion (serious trackies and som
    roadies), or have an underlying problem that needs to be 'babied'

    Consequently, it pays to appraise carefully the expertise and experienc
    of whoever works out your setup. If you are having real trouble, Emm
    Colson, a physio at Olympic Park Sports Med Centre, does video analysis
    but it costs big bucks ($160 for an hour I think). She also put
    together strengthening programs and stuff like that to help sort ou
    underlying weaknesses and imbalance - a real expert in the area. Othe
    sports physios should be able to help too, but be wary of the advice o
    physios and medicos who aren't well experienced in this area -
    personally have had some terrible advice in this area from physios wh
    didn't understand the mechanics of pedalling. Bike setup is quite
    specific skill


    -
     
  9. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "McViegh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Peter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "McViegh" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:[email protected]
    > > > Just wanted to make sure on the "rule of thumb"...
    > > >
    > > > Sore Knees - Raise the seat height
    > > >
    > > > Sore Ankles - Lower the seat height
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >
    > > I found lowering my seat helped prevent my knees from becoming sore. I
    > > guessed with the seat to high and using those shoes that clip in was

    > causing
    > > my legs to stretch rather than just pedal.
    > >
    > > I am now getting sore wrists which I have tried silicon gloves and those
    > > horns on the handle bars so I can change grip and lower the RSI risk.

    This
    > > helps but I am always open to other suggestions.
    > >
    > >
    > > :p
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Thanks for your reply. But I'm a little bit cautious about taking the

    advice
    > of someone that calls Bar Ends "horns".....lol
    >
    >



    lol
     
Loading...
Loading...