Sore Seat Solved

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by SlowRider, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. SlowRider

    SlowRider Guest

    Some weeks ago I "butted" into to a saddle thread to get some advice
    regarding my miserable sore butt. I was getting really sore after ~1.5
    hours on the bike and didn't know if this was usual or if there was
    something wrong with my setup.

    Happily, it was the latter. I took the bike into my LBS. They took a
    lot of measurements (arms, shoulders, inseam, total height) and entered
    it into a computer program that spit out a set of recommended bike
    settings. My seat was about 7 cm too low (!) and about 2 cm too far
    back. And since I had tilted the seat back in a wrong-headed attempt
    to keep my butt from sliding forward, we had to readjust it back to a
    level position.

    Two weeks since, I've made only two minor adjustments -- I moved the
    seat post back down a total of 4 mm and I moved the saddle forward an
    additional 2 mm - but it's a joy to ride. I've increased from 1 to 2.5
    hours, and I no longer have any serious pain. If my butt gets a little
    sore, I just get out of the saddle for ~30 seconds, flex my leg muscles
    a bit and sit down again.

    When I bought the bike ~4 years ago, the LBS salesperson did what I
    thought was a proper fit -- she used a plumb-bob to measure my
    knee-over-pedal, and made a few saddle and handlebar adjustments. I
    realize now that she was merely eye-balling it, so I had a lousy fit.
    (In her defense, the LBS didn't have a computerized fit system at the
    time.)

    So, thanks to those of you who told me that (a) long rides shouldn't
    cause real pain in the saddle and (b) a proper fit could solve my
    problem.


    -JR
     
    Tags:


  2. Ken C. M.

    Ken C. M. Guest

    SlowRider wrote:
    > Some weeks ago I "butted" into to a saddle thread to get some advice
    > regarding my miserable sore butt. I was getting really sore after ~1.5
    > hours on the bike and didn't know if this was usual or if there was
    > something wrong with my setup.
    >
    > Happily, it was the latter. I took the bike into my LBS. They took a
    > lot of measurements (arms, shoulders, inseam, total height) and entered
    > it into a computer program that spit out a set of recommended bike
    > settings. My seat was about 7 cm too low (!) and about 2 cm too far
    > back. And since I had tilted the seat back in a wrong-headed attempt
    > to keep my butt from sliding forward, we had to readjust it back to a
    > level position.
    >

    Wow. That must be a neat little computer program. I have never heard or
    read about anything like that. But that will probably mean that you will
    get a better fit than traditional methods.


    > Two weeks since, I've made only two minor adjustments -- I moved the
    > seat post back down a total of 4 mm and I moved the saddle forward an
    > additional 2 mm - but it's a joy to ride. I've increased from 1 to 2.5
    > hours, and I no longer have any serious pain. If my butt gets a little
    > sore, I just get out of the saddle for ~30 seconds, flex my leg muscles
    > a bit and sit down again.
    >
    > When I bought the bike ~4 years ago, the LBS salesperson did what I
    > thought was a proper fit -- she used a plumb-bob to measure my
    > knee-over-pedal, and made a few saddle and handlebar adjustments. I
    > realize now that she was merely eye-balling it, so I had a lousy fit.
    > (In her defense, the LBS didn't have a computerized fit system at the
    > time.)
    >
    > So, thanks to those of you who told me that (a) long rides shouldn't
    > cause real pain in the saddle and (b) a proper fit could solve my
    > problem.
    >
    >
    > -JR
    >


    Enjoy the fit.

    Ken

    Did you hapepen to get the name of the program?
    -
    You never have the wind with you - either it is against you or you're
    having a good day. ~Daniel Behrman, The Man Who Loved Bicycles

    Homepage: http://www.bikesandmoreonline.com/
     
  3. SlowRider

    SlowRider Guest

    Ken C. M. wrote:
    > Did you hapepen to get the name of the program?


    Sorry, I didn't get a good look at the program, but the LBS was able to
    give me a printout so I could do some of my own measurements at home.
    The system comes with several special tools. There's a kiosk you stand
    in while they measure your body and there are at least two tools for
    measuring aspects of the bike setup.


    -JR
     
  4. landotter

    landotter Guest

    SlowRider wrote:
    > Some weeks ago I "butted" into to a saddle thread to get some advice
    > regarding my miserable sore butt. I was getting really sore after ~1.5
    > hours on the bike and didn't know if this was usual or if there was
    > something wrong with my setup.
    >
    > Happily, it was the latter. I took the bike into my LBS. They took a
    > lot of measurements (arms, shoulders, inseam, total height) and entered
    > it into a computer program that spit out a set of recommended bike
    > settings. My seat was about 7 cm too low (!) and about 2 cm too far
    > back. And since I had tilted the seat back in a wrong-headed attempt
    > to keep my butt from sliding forward, we had to readjust it back to a
    > level position.
    >


    Nice to hear that you're comfy. I'm skeptical about such systems, but
    if it helped, cool. Did they measure if you pedaled flat footed or toes
    down? Were your femurs and shins measured as well? These are things
    that a basic "rough in" often neglect.

    Did they change your stem length or was that not part of the process or
    was it right to begin with?

    Must feel nice to have full leg extension. Almost like having a new
    bike. *g*
     
  5. Beverly

    Beverly Guest

    SlowRider wrote:
    > Ken C. M. wrote:
    > > Did you hapepen to get the name of the program?

    >
    > Sorry, I didn't get a good look at the program, but the LBS was able to
    > give me a printout so I could do some of my own measurements at home.
    > The system comes with several special tools. There's a kiosk you stand
    > in while they measure your body and there are at least two tools for
    > measuring aspects of the bike setup.
    >
    >
    > -JR


    Would it be something similar to this?

    http://www.bodyscanningcrm.com/
     
  6. SlowRider

    SlowRider Guest

    Beverly wrote:
    > Would it be something similar to this?
    >
    > http://www.bodyscanningcrm.com/


    Nice job finding the site -- that looks like it. It may be more a
    marketing tool than a professional fit system, but it worked pretty
    well in my case.


    -JR
     
  7. SlowRider

    SlowRider Guest

    landotter wrote:
    > Nice to hear that you're comfy. I'm skeptical about such systems, but
    > if it helped, cool. Did they measure if you pedaled flat footed or toes
    > down? Were your femurs and shins measured as well? These are things
    > that a basic "rough in" often neglect.


    I think your skepticism is warranted -- it appears to be as much of a
    marketing tool as a full-fledged fit system, but it's better than
    guessing and it worked in my case. The guy who performed the fit
    measured my legs a couple of ways, but I can't recall if or how he used
    the information.

    > Did they change your stem length or was that not part of the process or
    > was it right to begin with?


    He used a tool to measure seatpost-to-bars and the stem was about
    spot-on. I'm comfortable on the tops, on the hoods and in the drops,
    so I think it's OK.

    > Must feel nice to have full leg extension. Almost like having a new
    > bike. *g*


    It felt weird at first, but I got used to it really fast. It is a bit
    like having a new bike, but the best part of all is riding for 2+ hours
    and not wanting the ride to be over. :)


    -JR
     
  8. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    SlowRider wrote:
    > Beverly wrote:
    >
    >>Would it be something similar to this?
    >>
    >>http://www.bodyscanningcrm.com/

    >
    >
    > Nice job finding the site -- that looks like it. It may be more a
    > marketing tool than a professional fit system, but it worked pretty
    > well in my case.
    >
    >
    > -JR
    >

    It looks kind of cool but it also looks like a way to sell someone a
    higher priced bike because the program said it would fit better. Not
    that I am knocking it but didn't this start as a saddle thing? How about
    an x-ray of the sit bones so the saddle width could be matched up? I
    have different width saddles and some are really comfy while others are
    a definite mis-match. My 5 bikes all pretty much fit but the sit down
    point pretty much determines which one I can ride the farthest.
    I do have a favorite saddle but all the bikes have different seat post
    diameters. What's up with that?
    Bill
     
  9. The original lbs employee may not have done that awful of a job setting
    you up as lots of bikes suffer from seat post slip. Seat post keeps
    sliding down into the frame. Quick release seat post clamps don't
    always hold the seat post in as tight as you might expect. Every time
    you hit a bump, the seat could have slipped in slightly. ~4 years time
    could mean lots of slip.

    Other factors.

    Shoes. Some have thicker soles than others. Are you wearing the same
    shoes?

    Fat. Losing weight means less padding on your rear lowering your body.
    4 years of riding and you may have lost some weight.


    Rick
     
Loading...
Loading...