Soupe au cochon

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Victor Sack, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    The story below has been all over the European and American press in the
    past week or so. Here is one version. The (French) recipe for the soup
    referred to in the story can be found at
    <http://www.association-sdf.com/fichiers/fiche_pratique_soupe.pdf>. Here
    it is, carelessly translated on the fly.

    Pig soup
    Cooking time 3 hours

    2 kg smoked bacon
    1 pig ear
    2 pig trotters
    2 pig tails
    1 kg onions
    2 kg carrots
    2 kg turnips
    2 kg potatoes
    1 kg leeks
    1 kg celery stalks
    coarse salt

    The vegetables are peeled, washed and cut into small pieces. The meat is
    also cut in small cubes. The soup should be possible to eat without
    having to use a knife. Put everything into water to cook, add coarse
    salt. One shouldn't take too much water: it is called pig "soup", but
    the final result is rather less liquid than a classical soup. One should
    count on 3 hours of cooking, checking that the vegetables and the meat
    are cooked through.

    Victor


    From:
    <http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,1907672,00.html?maca=en-rss-en-all-1124-rdf>

    Charity Slammed for Serving Discriminatory Soup

    In Paris, a charity group linked to the far right is under fire for
    serving pork soup to the homeless. Critics say the government should ban
    the program as the choice of food discriminates against Muslims and
    Jews.

    Every Thursday night a handful of volunteers equipped with a trunk of
    hot food meet up in a poor district of Paris to feed the needy. They
    kick off with red wine served from a cask on the roof of a car, and an
    appetizer of dried sausage. That is followed with bowls of steaming hot
    soup, traditionally known as a "repas gaulois" or Gallic dinner, cheese
    and dessert.

    Anne Lucien-Brun, a retiree, has been volunteering with the group,
    Solidarity for the French (SDF) for the past year. "I am here to serve
    soup to the homeless, to the people who are let down by our society, and
    to those who accept eating soup with pork in it," she said. Although SDF
    has links to a fringe far-right political group, Lucien-Brun says that
    rather than being politically motivated, the work she does is about
    defending French traditions.

    "We are in France, in Europe. We cook with pork, we have soup with pork
    and we don't see why our country should be banned from doing something
    that is our tradition," Lucien-Brun said.

    The government doesn't actually prohibit pork dinners, but some city
    officials would like to see that happen. Paris City Hall is managed by a
    coalition of Socialists and Greens who say the meals are discriminatory
    and xenophobic because they're designed to exclude observant Muslims who
    don't eat pork.

    Although the police say there's no law against distributing soup to the
    homeless, they shut down weekly dinners twice in December on the grounds
    that they were creating a public disturbance. The volunteers say such
    action amounts to police harassment and prevents them from providing a
    much-needed service to anyone who wants to take advantage of it.

    Kalif Kamaté, a homeless Muslim from Mali says he prefers not to eat
    pork, but that these days he can't afford to be choosy. Similar pork
    dinners have been organized in Nice, Nantes and Strasbourg, where they
    were also banned for a time last month.

    Although they have since resumed, an anti-racism group is working to
    outlaw the initiative nationwide. Mouloud Aounit is President of the
    "Movement Against Racism and for Friendship Between People." He says the
    pork soup kitchens go against the very concept of solidarity.

    "These extremist groups are using the soup kitchen to spread their
    message of hate and contempt towards Muslims. We just can't accept this
    form of solidarity based on discrimination."

    But the SDF volunteers insist that they do not discriminate, and that
    anyone can eat their soup. Kamaté confirms that to be true. "At first I
    was told it was a private party. Then I asked the woman in charge and
    she allowed me to eat and drink with the others. It really helped me out
    because I'm homeless too and I face the same problems as the others."

    One such other person is Michel Bewulf, a 37-year-old who has been
    living on the streets for two years, ever since he got divorced and lost
    his job. He enjoys the Thursday night four-course spread. "I like to
    come here because it's friendly. It's also very secure," he said.
    "People offer me jackets, trousers, socks, sometimes money and food."

    Bewulf says other soup kitchens, where there are hundreds of people and
    not enough food, can be dangerous, and adds that some church groups
    proselytize while they serve. By contrast, he says the volunteers at the
    Gallic dinners don't bring up their political ideas and few of those who
    show up for their weekly serving of pork soup seem to care about the
    controversy it has stirred.

    Ultimately they are just happy to be fed and to share a meal in a
    pleasant atmosphere, where they don't have to fight for their food or be
    on their guard.

    Helen Seeney (tkw)
     
    Tags:


  2. Mabry

    Mabry Guest

    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1hbhswy.1c5a7ttuzsev4N%[email protected]
    > The (French) recipe for the soup
    > referred to in the story can be found at
    > <http://www.association-sdf.com/fichiers/fiche_pratique_soupe.pdf>.

    Here
    > it is, carelessly translated on the fly.
    >
    > Pig soup
    > Cooking time 3 hours
    >
    > 2 kg smoked bacon
    > 1 pig ear
    > 2 pig trotters
    > 2 pig tails
    > 1 kg onions
    > 2 kg carrots
    > 2 kg turnips
    > 2 kg potatoes
    > 1 kg leeks
    > 1 kg celery stalks
    > coarse salt


    The rest of the 'recipe' at the site given is so charming (& so
    quintessentially Gallic) I hope you will have the time and/or
    inclination to translate the rest of it for us who are French-language
    challenged. How could we possibly gain the full experience without,
    e.g., the 6 baguettes and 6 Camemberts?


    --
    Mabry
    C=;-{ }
     
  3. Victor Sack wrote:
    > The story below has been all over the European and American press in the
    > past week or so. Here is one version. The (French) recipe for the soup
    > referred to in the story can be found at
    > <http://www.association-sdf.com/fichiers/fiche_pratique_soupe.pdf>. Here
    > it is, carelessly translated on the fly.
    >
    > Pig soup
    > Cooking time 3 hours
    >
    > 2 kg smoked bacon
    > 1 pig ear
    > 2 pig trotters
    > 2 pig tails
    > 1 kg onions
    > 2 kg carrots
    > 2 kg turnips
    > 2 kg potatoes
    > 1 kg leeks
    > 1 kg celery stalks
    > coarse salt
    >
    > The vegetables are peeled, washed and cut into small pieces. The meat is
    > also cut in small cubes. The soup should be possible to eat without
    > having to use a knife. Put everything into water to cook, add coarse
    > salt. One shouldn't take too much water: it is called pig "soup", but
    > the final result is rather less liquid than a classical soup. One should
    > count on 3 hours of cooking, checking that the vegetables and the meat
    > are cooked through.
    >
    > Victor
    >


    Bubba Vic, I didn't read about this in the local papers, but what a
    cruel person it must have been, who dreamed this up. It is worthy of
    the beasts in charge of feeding Jews in the Concentration Camps of
    Hitler Germany.
     
  4. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Bubba Vic, I didn't read about this in the local papers, but what a
    > cruel person it must have been, who dreamed this up. It is worthy of
    > the beasts in charge of feeding Jews in the Concentration Camps of
    > Hitler Germany.


    Soup Nazis!

    Really, don't be so nasty, Resi! They call it "soupe identitaire"
    which, considering the major ingredient, identifies them with swine,
    presumably a fair comparison. That is probably the worst thing one can
    say about them, however. No need to equate ordinary swine with mass
    murderers.

    What they are doing is offering pork soup to all comers, every Thursday
    in winter. Quelle horreur! They are not locking anyone up and pouring
    that soup down their throats. They are just a small charity, not a
    monopoly. Don't like pork? Hie thee elsewhere. No soup for you!

    Why not pork, anyway? Surely not because it is not kosher or halal?
    What if they were serving beef? It certainly would be just as
    non-kosher. One either keeps kosher or not. Really, not even a
    vegetarian meal would do if it is not kosher. And what about poor
    starving Hindus? They would be just as offended by beef soup.

    Picture those multitudes of starving, homeless orthodox Jews roaming the
    streets of Paris, Strasbourg and Nice in search of the perfectly kosher
    repast served by the miraculously competent goyim. Oh, and a couple of
    Muslims joining them, too.

    And do tell me what is so wrong in serving pork to a starving Jew or
    Muslim? The principle of pikuach nefesh (saving life) takes precedence
    over laws of kashrut in Judaism and there is a very similar principle in
    Islam, too. If one is starving, one is allowed to eat anything if there
    is no choice.

    Let them eat Danish pastries!

    And if you think that New York soup kitchens don't serve pork, you are
    very much mistaken. See, for example,
    <http://www.citylimits.org/content/articles/articleView.cfm?articlenumber=421>
    <quote>
    The focal point of New York hunger relief is the 82,000-square-foot
    warehouse at Hunts Point Cooperative Market run by Food for Survival.
    For 10 cents a pound the providers get goods corporate America couldn't
    sell--failed test-marketed products, mislabeled packages, funny-colored
    batches of fruit juice--and USDA surplus, which has moved on from
    Reagan-era cheese to a surprisingly healthy variety of basics. But
    surplus is surplus: 15 truckloads of Iowa pork were February's windfall.
    </quote>
    Damn those racist Iowans!

    Bubba
     
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