Soupy Baked Beans - Best way to thicken??



B

Bunny McElwee

Guest
I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering this
weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a large can
of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked Beans) for me to
prepare. I've made baked beans in the past a few times, and
when using canned beans, it always seems as though they turn
out too soupy. I like to add things like mustard, brown
sugar, molasses and sometimes I've even added honey. All of
these items seem to contribute to the soupiness of the
beans. What is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced
when using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best method for
introducing the thickening agent into the beans and when?
Thanks for any and all help!

--
Bunny McElwee President, Lowcountry Miata Club
www.lowcountrymiataclub.net

1991 Mariner Blue with Red & White Stripes "BlueFlash"
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>"Bunny McElwee"
>
> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a
> large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in the
> past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I like
> to add things like mustard, brown sugar, molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items
> seem to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What
> is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when
> using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
> loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
> honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best
> method for introducing the thickening agent into the
> beans and when? Thanks for any and all help!
>
>Bunny

Nothing to add... evaporate some of the water, a five minute
boil in a wide pan, will reduce to a perfect consistancy.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
M

Melba'S Jammin

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, "Bunny McElwee"
<[email protected]> wrote:

> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a
> large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in the
> past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I like
> to add things like mustard, brown sugar, molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items
> seem to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What
> is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when
> using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
> loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
> honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best
> method for introducing the thickening agent into the
> beans and when? Thanks for any and all help!

I wouldn't try to thicken it; I'd drain some off.
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 3-8-04.
Rec.food.cooking's Preserved Fruit Administrator (I've got
the button to prove it!) "The only difference between a rut
and a grave is the depth of the hole."
 
P

Peter Aitken

Guest
"Bunny McElwee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend.
its
> for a Car Club. The club purchased a large can of beans
> (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked Beans) for me to prepare.
> I've made baked beans in the past a few times, and when
> using canned beans, it always seems as though they
turn
> out too soupy. I like to add things like mustard, brown
> sugar, molasses
and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items seem
> to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What is the
> best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when using canned
> beans and adding agents that seem to loosen the juice even
> further, such as sugar and honey/molasses? Flour?
> Cornstarch? Whats the best method for introducing the
> thickening agent into the beans and when? Thanks for any
> and all help!
>
>
> --

Strain the beans. Mix a small amount of the beans (5-10%
perhaps) with the liquid and mash thoroughly, then remix
with the beans.

--
Peter Aitken

Remove the **** from my email address before using.
 
A

Arri London

Guest
Bunny McElwee wrote:
>
> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a
> large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in the
> past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I like
> to add things like mustard, brown sugar, molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items
> seem to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What
> is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when
> using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
> loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
> honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best
> method for introducing the thickening agent into the
> beans and when? Thanks for any and all help!
>
> --
> Bunny McElwee
>

Drain the beans in a sieve and collect the liquid. Boil that
down until it's thick, then add the beans and reheat.

Alternatively, take a few spoons of beans out and mash
them to a paste. Mix the bean paste back into the rest of
the beans.
 
A

Andy

Guest
>Subject: Soupy Baked Beans - Best way to thicken??
>From: "Bunny McElwee" [email protected]
>Date: 3/10/04 3:08 PM Eastern Standard Time
>Message-id: <[email protected]>
>
> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a
> large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in the
> past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I like
> to add things like mustard, brown sugar, molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items
> seem to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What
> is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when
> using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
> loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
> honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best
> method for introducing the thickening agent into the
> beans and when? Thanks for any and all help!
>
>
>--
>Bunny McElwee President, Lowcountry Miata Club
>www.lowcountrymiataclub.net
>
>1991 Mariner Blue with Red & White Stripes "BlueFlash"
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

simmer baby simmer. http://www.pbase.com/andrcom
 
T

Tracey

Guest
"Bunny McElwee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
. I like to add things like mustard, brown sugar,
molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items seem
> to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What is the
> best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when using canned
> beans and adding agents that seem to loosen the juice even
> further, such as sugar and honey/molasses?

Cook them in a casserole dish in the oven for a LONG time on
a low temperature.
 
W

Wayne Boatwrigh

Guest
"Bunny McElwee" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a
> large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in the
> past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I like
> to add things like mustard, brown sugar, molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items
> seem to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What
> is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when
> using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
> loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
> honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best
> method for introducing the thickening agent into the
> beans and when? Thanks for any and all help!

Eliminating part of the liquid is a good way to solve the
problem. The following recipe is excellent and calls for
Bush's Baked Beans.

* Exported from MasterCook *

Special Baked Beans

Recipe By : Robb Dabbs Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time
:0:00 Categories : Side dish Vegetables

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method --------
------------ -------------------------------- 2 cn (28-oz)
Bush's baked beans
1/2 lb Bacon, diced 1 2-inch yellow onion, diced 3 tb
Light brown sugar, packed 3 tb Tomato catsup 1 t
Coleman's dry mustard
2/2 ts French's yellow mustard
3/2 ts Worcestershire sauce
4/2 ts Tobasco sauce
5/2 ts Freshly ground black pepper 2 tb Bacon fat
Reserved bean liquid

Pour baked beans into colander and drain, reserving
liquid. Fry diced bacon until crisp. Add bacon to beans,
reserving fat. Fry diced onion in bacon fat until
transparent but not brown. Add onion and 2 tablespoons of
the bacon fat to the beans.

Mix remaining ingredients in small mixing bowl. Add
mixture to beans and combine all ingredients throughly,
but gently. Add sufficient reserved bean liquid to moisten
bean mixture. It should not be soupy.

Turn bean mixture into 2-quart casserole. Beans may be
refrigerated and held one or two days until baking.

Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Bake beans uncovered for
30-45 minutes until a crust forms on top. Serves six.

Robb Dabbs May 11, 1985
 
S

Sf

Guest
On 10 Mar 2004 20:26:23 GMT, [email protected] (PENMART01)
wrote:

>
> Nothing to add... evaporate some of the water, a five
> minute boil in a wide pan, will reduce to a perfect
> consistancy.
>
Perfect answer.

<add the extras if you thing it needs the flavoring AFTER
evaporating the extra liquid>

Practice safe eating - always use condiments
 
C

Charles Gifford

Guest
"Tracey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Bunny McElwee" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message news:[email protected]...
> . I like to add things like mustard, brown sugar,
> molasses and
> > sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items seem
> > to contribute
to
> > the soupiness of the beans. What is the best way to
> > thicken the "gravy" produced when using canned beans and
> > adding agents that seem to loosen
the
> > juice even further, such as sugar and honey/molasses?
>
> Cook them in a casserole dish in the oven for a LONG time
> on a low temperature.

I agree. That is the best way. Otherwise do it Sheldon's
way. Do not drain them!

Charlie
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>"Bunny McElwee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]...
>> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
>> this weekend.
>its
>> for a Car Club. The club purchased a large can of beans
>> (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked Beans) for me to prepare.
>> I've made baked beans in the past a few times, and when
>> using canned beans, it always seems as though they
>turn
>> out too soupy. I like to add things like mustard, brown
>> sugar, molasses
>and
>> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items seem
>> to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What is the
>> best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when using
>> canned beans and adding agents that seem to loosen the
>> juice even further, such as sugar and honey/molasses?
>> Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best method for introducing
>> the thickening agent into the beans and when? Thanks for
>> any and all help!
>
>Strain the beans. Mix a small amount of the beans (5-10%
>perhaps) with the liquid and mash thoroughly, then remix
>with the beans.
>
>Peter Aitken

You don't know beans.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>"Bunny McElwee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]...
>> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
>> this weekend.
>its
>> for a Car Club. The club purchased a large can of beans
>> (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked Beans) for me to prepare.
>> I've made baked beans in the past a few times, and when
>> using canned beans, it always seems as though they
>turn
>> out too soupy. I like to add things like mustard, brown
>> sugar, molasses
>and
>> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items seem
>> to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What is the
>> best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when using
>> canned beans and adding agents that seem to loosen the
>> juice even further, such as sugar and honey/molasses?
>> Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best method for introducing
>> the thickening agent into the beans and when? Thanks for
>> any and all help!
>
>Strain the beans. Mix a small amount of the beans (5-10%
>perhaps) with the liquid and mash thoroughly, then remix
>with the beans.
>
>Peter Aitken

You don't know beans.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
> "Bunny McElwee"
><[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
>> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased
>> a large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
>> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in
>> the past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
>> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I
>> like to add things like mustard, brown sugar,
>> molasses and sometimes I've even added honey. All of
>> these items seem to contribute to the soupiness of
>> the beans. What is the best way to thicken the
>> "gravy" produced when using canned beans and adding
>> agents that seem to loosen the juice even further,
>> such as sugar and honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch?
>> Whats the best method for introducing the thickening
>> agent into the beans and when? Thanks for any and all
>> help!
>
>I wouldn't try to thicken it; I'd drain some off.
>--
>-Barb

Yeah, but... then some flavor is lost... that would be like
tossing some juice from your jam squishings down the
drain... reduce.

I reduce canned bean juice to get rid of the wateryness all
the time, intensifies the flavor too... of course the
ultimate is to toss a few good natural casing dogs into the
pot and let is simmer for a half hour... liquid reduces,
dogs cook, and it tastes yummy! But then I dilute it anyway,
by sucking down a couple tall cool brewskis.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
> "Bunny McElwee"
><[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
>> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased
>> a large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
>> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in
>> the past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
>> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I
>> like to add things like mustard, brown sugar,
>> molasses and sometimes I've even added honey. All of
>> these items seem to contribute to the soupiness of
>> the beans. What is the best way to thicken the
>> "gravy" produced when using canned beans and adding
>> agents that seem to loosen the juice even further,
>> such as sugar and honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch?
>> Whats the best method for introducing the thickening
>> agent into the beans and when? Thanks for any and all
>> help!
>
>I wouldn't try to thicken it; I'd drain some off.
>--
>-Barb

Yeah, but... then some flavor is lost... that would be like
tossing some juice from your jam squishings down the
drain... reduce.

I reduce canned bean juice to get rid of the wateryness all
the time, intensifies the flavor too... of course the
ultimate is to toss a few good natural casing dogs into the
pot and let is simmer for a half hour... liquid reduces,
dogs cook, and it tastes yummy! But then I dilute it anyway,
by sucking down a couple tall cool brewskis.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>Arri London
>
>Drain the beans in a sieve and collect the liquid. Boil
>that down until it's thick, then add the beans and reheat.

Why dirty a sieve,simply heat the entire contents to the
boil, within three minutes the liquid will have been
appropriately reduced... the beans need heating anyway...
logic. Do you dress yourself?

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>Arri London
>
>Drain the beans in a sieve and collect the liquid. Boil
>that down until it's thick, then add the beans and reheat.

Why dirty a sieve,simply heat the entire contents to the
boil, within three minutes the liquid will have been
appropriately reduced... the beans need heating anyway...
logic. Do you dress yourself?

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
S

stan

Guest
Bunny McElwee <[email protected]> wrote:
> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a
> large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in the
> past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I like
> to add things like mustard, brown sugar, molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items
> seem to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What
> is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when
> using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
> loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
> honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best
> method for introducing the thickening agent into the
> beans and when? Thanks for any and all help!

Bush's baked beans are an exception for canned baked beans
as they are pretty thick right out of the can. To add to the
thickening effect, simply cook the baked beans slowly for at
least an hour in a crockpot or bake them in the oven at low
temp (around 200) for an hour or two until they get thick
enough for you. That's all there is to it.
 
S

stan

Guest
Bunny McElwee <[email protected]> wrote:
> I am in charge of bringing baked beans to a gathering
> this weekend. its for a Car Club. The club purchased a
> large can of beans (117 oz. Original Bush's Baked
> Beans) for me to prepare. I've made baked beans in the
> past a few times, and when using canned beans, it
> always seems as though they turn out too soupy. I like
> to add things like mustard, brown sugar, molasses and
> sometimes I've even added honey. All of these items
> seem to contribute to the soupiness of the beans. What
> is the best way to thicken the "gravy" produced when
> using canned beans and adding agents that seem to
> loosen the juice even further, such as sugar and
> honey/molasses? Flour? Cornstarch? Whats the best
> method for introducing the thickening agent into the
> beans and when? Thanks for any and all help!

Bush's baked beans are an exception for canned baked beans
as they are pretty thick right out of the can. To add to the
thickening effect, simply cook the baked beans slowly for at
least an hour in a crockpot or bake them in the oven at low
temp (around 200) for an hour or two until they get thick
enough for you. That's all there is to it.
 
J

Jmameigh Msngle

Guest
This is the best reply I have read yet !!!!! Good job !
Similar to my Mom's baked bean recipe using Grandma Brown's
baked beans and I have continued to make them this way also.
This site is very entertaining, if I must say so, even tho
there are very few actual recipes on it. (smile) Hope it
continues. Judy
 
J

Jmameigh Msngle

Guest
This is the best reply I have read yet !!!!! Good job !
Similar to my Mom's baked bean recipe using Grandma Brown's
baked beans and I have continued to make them this way also.
This site is very entertaining, if I must say so, even tho
there are very few actual recipes on it. (smile) Hope it
continues. Judy