Soymilk maker

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Zxcvbob, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Zxcvbob

    Zxcvbob Guest

    [Notice that follow-ups are being redirected to r.f.c.]

    I bought Wife a soymilk maker for christmas because she was
    buying a lot of overpriced soy products trying to find one
    she liked. She seemed to like the concept but hasn't used it
    much -- perhaps because none of us really like soy milk.

    I decided to try using adzuki beans instead of soybeans in
    it last night just to see what happens. Adzuki beans are
    used in Japan and China and (I think) Korea for making
    desserts; they are sweeter than any other bean and they are
    lower in fat than soybeans.

    The stuff actually tastes OK, but it is the most awful
    pinkish gray-brown you can imagine. And it's oddly thick.
    The okara that was left over doesn't taste bad at all, and
    it might be a good addition to oatmeal, or mixed into
    bread dough.

    Best regards, Bob
     
    Tags:


  2. zxcvbob wrote:

    > [Notice that follow-ups are being redirected to r.f.c.]
    >
    > I bought Wife a soymilk maker for christmas because she
    > was buying a lot of overpriced soy products trying to
    > find one she liked. She seemed to like the concept but
    > hasn't used it much -- perhaps because none of us really
    > like soy milk.
    >
    > I decided to try using adzuki beans instead of soybeans in
    > it last night just to see what happens. Adzuki beans are
    > used in Japan and China and (I think) Korea for making
    > desserts; they are sweeter than any other bean and they
    > are lower in fat than soybeans.
    >
    > The stuff actually tastes OK, but it is the most awful
    > pinkish gray-brown you can imagine. And it's oddly thick.
    > The okara that was left over doesn't taste bad at all, and
    > it might be a good addition to oatmeal, or mixed into
    > bread dough.
    >
    > Best regards, Bob

    Cows in Minnehaha land don't make milk anymore? My
    wife tried soymilk and could never find a brand she
    could stomach.

    George
     
  3. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    > [Notice that follow-ups are being redirected to r.f.c.]
    >
    > I bought Wife a soymilk maker for christmas because she
    > was buying a lot of overpriced soy products trying to
    > find one she liked. She seemed to like the concept but
    > hasn't used it much -- perhaps because none of us really
    > like soy milk.
    >
    > I decided to try using adzuki beans instead of soybeans in
    > it last night just to see what happens. Adzuki beans are
    > used in Japan and China and (I think) Korea for making
    > desserts; they are sweeter than any other bean and they
    > are lower in fat than soybeans.
    >
    > The stuff actually tastes OK, but it is the most awful
    > pinkish gray-brown you can imagine. And it's oddly thick.
    > The okara that was left over doesn't taste bad at all, and
    > it might be a good addition to oatmeal, or mixed into
    > bread dough.
    >
    > Best regards, Bob

    What is a soy milk maker supposed to do? We soak the beans,
    grind them and strain out the liquid. It's then brought to a
    boil. It is a shame that soy milk is so expensive in the US.
    Such a quick and easy thing to make.
     
  4. Ada Ma

    Ada Ma Guest

    Arri London wrote:

    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >>[Notice that follow-ups are being redirected to r.f.c.]
    >>
    >>I bought Wife a soymilk maker for christmas because she
    >>was buying a lot of overpriced soy products trying to
    >>find one she liked. She seemed to like the concept but
    >>hasn't used it much -- perhaps because none of us really
    >>like soy milk.
    >>
    >>I decided to try using adzuki beans instead of soybeans in
    >>it last night just to see what happens. Adzuki beans are
    >>used in Japan and China and (I think) Korea for making
    >>desserts; they are sweeter than any other bean and they
    >>are lower in fat than soybeans.
    >>
    >>The stuff actually tastes OK, but it is the most awful
    >>pinkish gray-brown you can imagine. And it's oddly thick.
    >>The okara that was left over doesn't taste bad at all, and
    >>it might be a good addition to oatmeal, or mixed into
    >>bread dough.
    >>
    >>Best regards, Bob
    >
    >
    > What is a soy milk maker supposed to do? We soak the
    > beans, grind them and strain out the liquid. It's then
    > brought to a boil. It is a shame that soy milk is so
    > expensive in the US. Such a quick and easy thing to make.

    I also happen to have bought one recently - and I love soya
    milk! The output is like those soya milk I can get in soya
    milk stalls/stores in Hong Kong. These stores specialise in
    a few products - soya milk, tofu, tofu far, dried tofu
    skin... You can also eat in there - they sell shallow fried
    dumplings, buns, etc. along with the soya products.

    Anyway, back to the machine - you can actually make nut
    milks with them as well. They basically heat up the water,
    grind (and strain) the beans, and heat up the soya milk. I
    got mine from here:
    http://www.londonthing.force9.co.uk/soya/

    If you prefer store bought soya milk you might not be overly
    impressed with the output. But if you're like me who miss
    those soya milk stalls an awful lot, then you should get one
    straight away!

    Bob is right in saying that adzuki beans are used for making
    dessert in Japan and China. In Hong Kong, they make adzuki
    bean soup with chin pi (dried satsuma peel, preferably
    aged). Apparently in ancient China they make congee with
    adzuki beans and rice, which is given to the Gods to thank
    them for the good harvests.

    My Japanese colleages say that the okara can be used to make
    something akin to fried rice - just add sesame oil, salt,
    soya sauce, and sugar and shallow fry them.

    Ada
     
  5. Ada Ma

    Ada Ma Guest

    Forgot to mention - earlier this year I made a trip to
    Shanghai and they have a chain store that sells soya milk
    and other food products - under a sort of McDonald's style
    management. Anyway, my post isn't about corporate
    governance but rather about their soya milk. On their shop
    pamphlets they say they put rice in their soya milk to make
    it more aromatic.

    So armed with this knowledge I tried throwing in some long
    grain plain rice along with the soaked soya beans into my
    machine and viola! the result is just like the soya milk I
    had in that chain and it was gorgeous.
     
  6. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Ada Ma wrote:
    >
    > Forgot to mention - earlier this year I made a trip to
    > Shanghai and they have a chain store that sells soya milk
    > and other food products - under a sort of McDonald's style
    > management. Anyway, my post isn't about corporate
    > governance but rather about their soya milk. On their shop
    > pamphlets they say they put rice in their soya milk to
    > make it more aromatic.
    >
    > So armed with this knowledge I tried throwing in some long
    > grain plain rice along with the soaked soya beans into my
    > machine and viola! the result is just like the soya milk I
    > had in that chain and it was gorgeous.

    That sounds good. Will try that next time. Used to buy a coconut-
    flavoured soy milk that I liked very much, but never tried
    to duplicate it. Fresh soy milk is soooooo very much nicer
    than any of the brands in shops.
     
Loading...