Spares for cycling holiday?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Sl, Jun 9, 2003.

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  1. Sl

    Sl Guest

    Hi. I'm off on my hols to Tuscany with bicycle and girlfriend for a week. Sensible recommendations
    for spares and tools (for bicycle, not girlfriend)?

    Are brake cables and gear cables the same thing, or do I need one (or two) of each?

    And what do people do with their bike packing at the other end? I've got to find a way to stash lots
    of bubble wrap and tape and stuff at Pisa airport for the journey home.

    Regards,

    Si
     
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  2. In message <[email protected]>, SL <[email protected]> writes
    >Hi. I'm off on my hols to Tuscany with bicycle and girlfriend for a week. Sensible recommendations
    >for spares and tools (for bicycle, not girlfriend)?
    >
    >Are brake cables and gear cables the same thing, or do I need one (or two) of each?
    >
    >And what do people do with their bike packing at the other end? I've got to find a way to stash
    >lots of bubble wrap and tape and stuff at Pisa airport for the journey home.

    As regards packing Garry Lee (regular poster on rec.bicycle.rides) recently wrote the following and
    he has plenty of experience with flights and bikes.

    "We only take off pedals and turn bars. This I believe is the safest way to transport or ship as the
    Yanks say, a bike. Putting in a box is a recipe for a large elephant to be plonked on top of it."

    I'd take some spare inner tubes, tyre levers and basic tool kit with spoke key, chain tool, screw
    driver, small spanner. I wouldn't know what to do with anything else and if anything more than
    simple work was needed I'd be heading for the nearest bike shop.

    Have fun in Tuscany. Please write a short report because I may be going there in September.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "SL" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi. I'm off on my hols to Tuscany with bicycle and girlfriend for a week. Sensible recommendations
    > for spares and tools (for bicycle, not girlfriend)?
    >
    > Are brake cables and gear cables the same thing, or do I need one (or two) of each?
    >
    > And what do people do with their bike packing at the other end? I've got to find a way to stash
    > lots of bubble wrap and tape and stuff at Pisa airport for the journey home.

    They have bike shops in Italy so a massive spares & repair kit is not necessary (unless you bike is
    so old it has British treads etc.)

    I would take a couple of tubes, a bit of old tube to use as a boot, a cable or two, some spare nuts
    & bolts (very few), some tie wraps, duck tape, insulating tape and that strong polypropylene string
    that is almost unbreakable (though you can usually blag some from farmer's fields).

    Tools -- a set of allen keys (&/or a dumbell spanner if your bike is as old as mine), a swiss army
    knife & a winning smile.

    Ring the airline and tell them you are going to take the pedals off & turn the bars -- is that OK?
    If yes, ask for them to e-mail you back confirming above. If not, do as you are told -- but boxes do
    attract sitting elephants
    :(

    T
     
  4. David Gillbe

    David Gillbe Guest

    > And what do people do with their bike packing at the other end? I've got to find a way to stash
    > lots of bubble wrap and tape and stuff at Pisa airport for the journey home.

    Cautionary tale on bubble wrap. It melts. I know a cellist who wrapped her cello in bubble wrap when
    going on tour, only to have to pay an extremely large bill to have the cello cleaned and
    re-varnished. Obviously, its easier to get it off a bike, but the warning still applies.
     
  5. John B

    John B Guest

    David Gillbe wrote:

    > > And what do people do with their bike packing at the other end? I've got to find a way to stash
    > > lots of bubble wrap and tape and stuff at Pisa airport for the journey home.
    >
    > Cautionary tale on bubble wrap. It melts. I know a cellist who wrapped her cello in bubble wrap
    > when going on tour, only to have to pay an extremely large bill to have the cello cleaned and
    > re-varnished. Obviously, its easier to get it off a bike, but the warning still applies.

    I've tended to use pipe lagging on the main tubes, taped on. I'd certainly always avoid any form of
    bag or box if possible. Clear polythene bags are about the best if forced to use a cover. Its
    important that handlers see its a bike.

    I've never had problems finding a bush somewhere near the airport to hide pipe lagging under for
    the duration of my trips. It's usually got insects or snails attached, but its always been there on
    my return.

    John B
     
  6. Allan Nelson

    Allan Nelson Guest

    Hi I've been to Italy a few times now with my bike (and Pisa airport twice). There's info here on
    what tools we take, how we pack the bikes etc. http://www.a-nelson.dircon.co.uk/index.htm

    Perosnally, one thing I wouldn't leave out of the toolkit is a chainwhip (I just made my own out of
    an old bit of chain) and block remover. If you bust a spoke you can bet your bottom dollar it'll be
    on the rear and on the block side. Just busting one spoke, your bike may be rideable (mine isn't
    when it's loaded, but thats the price you pay for 9 speed blocks ;-) Oh, and it won't break as
    you're passing a bike shop - trust me.

    As for packing. We tend to use pipe lagging. Last year, I took the pipe lagging off when we got
    there, scrunched it up into a plastic carrier bag, put a few turns of tape around it and strapped it
    on top of the rear panniers with a bungee cord. It weighed nothing (and looks mighty impressive when
    your toiling up the Passo whatever ;-) Seriously, it worked a treat, and I never found it got in the
    way. Surprising how small it will pack down.

    Hope this helps... Allan.

    "SL" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi. I'm off on my hols to Tuscany with bicycle and girlfriend for a week. Sensible recommendations
    > for spares and tools (for bicycle, not girlfriend)?
    >
    > Are brake cables and gear cables the same thing, or do I need one (or two) of each?
    >
    > And what do people do with their bike packing at the other end? I've got to find a way to stash
    > lots of bubble wrap and tape and stuff at Pisa airport for the journey home.
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Si
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    SL wrote:
    > Hi. I'm off on my hols to Tuscany with bicycle and girlfriend for a week. Sensible recommendations
    > for spares and tools (for bicycle, not girlfriend)?

    I would make sure bikes are in tip top condition then just carry the normal "long-ride" tools like:
    puncture kit, inner tubes (3?), full set of allen keys, small screwdriver, spanners or multi-tool
    (if bike requires spanners), spoke key if know how to use it.

    > Are brake cables and gear cables the same thing, or do I need one (or two) of each?

    Brake & gear cables are different. One of each should do - although you're very unlikely to need
    them if current ones are in good condition (check for corrosion or fraying at the ends: at nipple
    and at or before bolt - doesn't matter if frayed after bolt).

    ~PB
     
  8. Sl

    Sl Guest

    Thanks for all your tips - I'll be straight down the DIY shop for some pipe lagging. I don't suppose
    RyanAir take many elephants from Stansted but you can never be too sure.

    Si.
     
  9. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "SL" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Hi. I'm off on my hols to Tuscany with bicycle and girlfriend for a week. Sensible recommendations
    > for spares and tools (for bicycle, not girlfriend)?
    >

    Saw someone the other day riding along one handed with a whole spare bike in the other hand. That's
    probably taking things a little too far.
     
  10. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, SL <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Thanks for all your tips - I'll be straight down the DIY shop for some pipe lagging. I don't
    > suppose RyanAir take many elephants from Stansted but you can never be too sure.

    I have seen a few ephalumps travelling from Stansted - they have all been of the variety ephalumpia
    humanii:)

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
  11. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Andy wrote:

    > Saw someone the other day riding along one handed with a whole spare bike in the other hand.
    > That's probably taking things a little too far.

    Hehe - I saw a bloke riding along with another bike strapped across his rear rack! as in one wheel
    sticking out each side. This on a towpath, not traffic btw :)

    --

    -Alex

    ----------------------------------
    [email protected]

    http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php http://www.westerleycycling.org.uk
    ----------------------------------
     
  12. My must haves.

    1. Repair kit with tyre boot ( canvas).(have used boot once or twice.
    2. 3 spare tubes. Have got 4 punctures in one morning. On three wheels (mine and wife's)
    3. Spare tyre if going far. Have used about 4 times on tour.
    4. Cooltool. Best though not most versatile tool.
    5. Levers. Metal best.
    6. Hypercracker. Have used 3 or 4 times.
    7. 1 Spare Gear and brake wire (have never replaced either in more than 40 tours, but you
    never know)
    8. A few spare spokes. Have used a few times.
    9. Spoke key. 10 Saddle spanner (I use Brooks saddles). Have used twice.
    10. Pump of course. Best I've come across for touring is Blackburn Mammoth Dual. Great pressure,
    fast and fits in pannier.
     
  13. Peter Storey

    Peter Storey Guest

    "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > My must haves.
    >
    > 1. Repair kit with tyre boot ( canvas).(have used boot once or twice.
    > 2. 3 spare tubes. Have got 4 punctures in one morning. On three wheels (mine and wife's)
    > 3. Spare tyre if going far. Have used about 4 times on tour.
    > 4. Cooltool. Best though not most versatile tool.
    > 5. Levers. Metal best.
    > 6. Hypercracker. Have used 3 or 4 times.
    > 7. 1 Spare Gear and brake wire (have never replaced either in more than 40 tours, but you never
    > know)
    > 8. A few spare spokes. Have used a few times.
    > 9. Spoke key. 10 Saddle spanner (I use Brooks saddles). Have used twice.
    > 11. Pump of course. Best I've come across for touring is Blackburn Mammoth Dual. Great pressure,
    > fast and fits in pannier.

    I agree with all, although I think that THREE spare tubes (AND a patch kit) is a bit pessimistic.
    Also, your bike probably has three different sizes of spokes, so I bring one or two of the Fiber-fix
    kevlar things instead. Touch wood: I've never had to use them.

    I'd add: (12) 6 feet or so of duct tape wrapped around a film can filled with Vaseline (can be used
    on both bike and rider), (13) 3 feet or so of electricians tape wrapped around a film can filled
    with hand cleaner, (14) 10 feet or so of heavy twine, light nylon cord or similar (because s**t
    happens, e.g. if you break or lose a pannier hook, what is your fallback?) and (15) -- the sheer
    luxury of clean hands -- 2 or 3 pairs of surgical gloves stuffed into a small ziploc bag.

    If you ride clipless, consider bringing an extra cleat and mounting bolts. This falls into the
    category of "unlikely to happen, but what will you do if it does?" Less of an issue if you have
    Hamlet pedals (SPD on one side, traditional cage on the other).

    There are some STI/ERGO users who take along a downtube shift lever in the bottom of the toolkit,
    just in case. Especially in the mountains, you'd hate to find yourself with no rear shifting. I use
    bar-cons, so I've never really worried about this.

    Peter Storey
     
  14. Peter Storey

    Peter Storey Guest

    "Clifford Griffiths" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Peter Storey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > >
    > In many tours the only things I have ever used are:
    >
    > spokes tubes folding tyre (essential if riding Continentals) bag elastic mudguard clip
    >
    > Cliff

    Did you mean "used" or "taken along" (the latter being what I thought we were talking about). I just
    finished a week's tour with two friends amd the only tool/spare that we actually used was a 5mmm
    Allen key.

    Of course we found we needed precisely what we didn't have -- some grease for a squeaky seat post
    and for some sticky brake posts. Given the choice between olive oil and sunscreen, we used the
    sunscreen. Worked fine.

    "What to take" is a bit like buying insurance. You don't want the premium to be any higher than it
    needs to be, but you want enough coverage so that you're unlikely to get truly stuck. And in both
    cases, you'd much prefer to find that you never needed it after all.

    Peter Storey
     
  15. "Peter Storey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Clifford Griffiths" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Peter Storey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > >
    > >> >
    > > spokes tubes folding tyre (essential if riding Continentals) bag elastic mudguard clip
    > >
    > > Cliff
    >
    >
    > Did you mean "used" or "taken along" (the latter being what I thought
    > > .
    > No I meant used. I'm talking about 2 bikes doing about 35,000 miles in
    total on tarmac.

    Cliff
     
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