SPD clip positioning....

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Rob Woozle, Apr 16, 2003.

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  1. Rob Woozle

    Rob Woozle Guest

    I've had SPD's for a few years now on my MTB and it occurred to me that the guy in the shop just put
    the plate on the bottom of each shoe and I never challenged where it went!

    After suffering a dodgy knee for a while I wondered if there is a correct method of positioning the
    cleat/clip/plate (whatever it is called) on the bottom of the shoe? Can anyone shed some light on
    this for me?

    Hoo Roo, Rob
     
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  2. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Rob Woozle wrote:
    > I've had SPD's for a few years now on my MTB and it occurred to me that the guy in the shop just
    > put the plate on the bottom of each shoe and I never challenged where it went!

    There are two variables:
    - fore-aft position: this changes the leverage for your calf muscles.

    - rotation: adjust for the natural position of your foot, so the cleat doesnt force you heel too far
    in or out. There is a limited amount of free movement, called "float".

    > After suffering a dodgy knee for a while I wondered if there is a correct

    --
    make nospam into oz to reply.
     
  3. Chester1

    Chester1 New Member

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    [I ride SPD pedals on my commuting bike..same thing..dodgy knees and took the initial set up position as gospel. Went everywhere with an allen key in my pocket to do on-the-road adjustments.

    I have the cleats positioned fore and aft so that big bone (I don't know what it's called) on the inside of my foot, a little behind the big toe..ball of the foot?..is over the axle. Then I angled the cleat to one side or the other, and moved it to right and left, so it felt comfortable.

    I know everyone is different, but once I came to the realisation that what I had originally was wrong, I just kept moving the cleats a little at a time. Took a lot of trial and error.

    Good luck with it.
     
  4. > After suffering a dodgy knee for a while I wondered if there is a correct method of positioning
    > the cleat/clip/plate (whatever it is called) on the bottom of the shoe? Can anyone shed some light
    > on this for me?
    >
    > Hoo Roo, Rob

    My knee's been dodgy for years; held together with string and tupperware after a work accident. I
    started my cliplessness with SPDs, constantly fiddling with cleat position, reading lots of
    articles, etc. Comfort was better in some positions than others but never pain free.

    With the SPDs I found locating the cleat slightly (~2-3mm) back from the ball of the foot helped my
    knee (at the cost of some peddling efficiency, no doubt, but I don't race or worry too much about
    that). I also found that turning the cleat so that it was close to the inside release point was
    better for me, leaving what float there was to be taken up by the 'heel out' position (doesn't sound
    too clear, but I hope you get what I mean...). That was the most comfortable position for me,
    although it certainly wasn't pain-free.

    Someone lent me some Time ATACs to try. After a few rides to get used to the slightly different
    action I was sold. My knee is so much less painful. I could squawk on about more float, release
    angles and so-on, but I don't really care about the why; they work well for me.

    You might try borrowing a pair of ATACs and see what you think.

    Cheers,

    Frank
     
  5. Rob Woozle

    Rob Woozle Guest

    Thanks everyone....

    Rob
     
  6. Malcom

    Malcom New Member

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    Some good advise above which is how I used to set my cleats but then I discovered a device called "Fit Kit". This thing bolts on in place of your pedals and consists of two plates with a pivot bolt joining them. The two plates are parallel to the ground and are effectivly your pedal. Each plate has a skewer that stick out of it and, due to the natural movement and alignment of your hip joints etc. both are free to move around as you cycle. The idea is that the operator adjusts your cleat position for minimum movement of the skewers whilst you pedal thereby giving the minimum stress on your joints and best alignment of foot to axle etc. I have quite a bit less muscle and knee pain now so it worked for me.
    Check out the website http://www.bikefitkit.com/fit_kit/universal_adapter.html

    Innercitycycles in Sydney has the one I used, cost $22 for the job.
     
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