SPD Pedals

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Budgie, Oct 24, 2003.

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  1. Budgie

    Budgie Guest

    As a rank amateur, can someone explain the benefit/purpose of SPD pedals. Are special shoes required
    to use them?

    Budgie

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  2. Budgie wrote:

    > As a rank amateur, can someone explain the benefit/purpose of SPD pedals. Are special shoes
    > required to use them?
    >
    > Budgie
    >
    >
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    >
    >
    You can pull up as well as push down which gives you a lot more power, especially when climbing
    hills. You can also try and develop that perfect "round" pedal action which eludes most of us (a
    look at the wear pattern of my inner chainring proves I only push hard with my right foot!).

    You do need suitable shoes, but most mountain bike shoes these days are designed for them. The
    pedals come with cleats which you must take some time to fix in a comfortable position.

    IME they always let go in a crash - even the black cleats. If you're a powerful rider I'd stick
    to the black ones as the alternative silver "multi-release" cleats might let go at an
    inopportune moment.
     
  3. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Budgie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > As a rank amateur, can someone explain the benefit/purpose of SPD pedals. Are special shoes
    > required to use them?

    I tried some for a couple of weeks this summer (not SPDs but Time ATACS) and loved the feel of them.
    They made my legs feel like part of the drivetrain rather than just pushing it. Unfortunately they
    made my knees ache so had to come off. I didn't fully appreciate the difference they made to my
    riding until the next day out with the old toeclips. I could have wept. Of course I'd have wept more
    had I persisted and damaged my knees. I do intend to give them another go though. A little more
    cautiously this time. They're definitely worth another shot. tony R.
     
  4. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Budgie wrote:
    >
    > > As a rank amateur, can someone explain the benefit/purpose of SPD
    pedals.
    > > Are special shoes required to use them?
    > >
    > > Budgie
    > >
    > >
    > > ---
    > > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system
    > > (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.530 / Virus Database: 325 - Release Date: 22/10/2003
    > >
    > >
    > You can pull up as well as push down which gives you a lot more power, especially when climbing
    > hills. You can also try and develop that perfect "round" pedal action which eludes most of us (a
    > look at the wear pattern of my inner chainring proves I only push hard with my right
    foot!).
    >
    > You do need suitable shoes,

    For a lot of SPD style pedals you do !

    Graham

    but most mountain bike shoes these days are
    > designed for them. The pedals come with cleats which you must take some time to fix in a
    > comfortable position.
    >
    > IME they always let go in a crash - even the black cleats. If you're a powerful rider I'd stick
    > to the black ones as the alternative silver "multi-release" cleats might let go at an
    > inopportune moment.
     
  5. Budgie

    Budgie Guest

    "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    | >
    If you're a powerful rider . . . .
    |

    If only! Used to be around 30 years ago, but only used platform pedals and toeclips, then.

    Budgie

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  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Budgie wrote:

    > As a rank amateur, can someone explain the benefit/purpose of SPD pedals. Are special shoes
    > required to use them?

    AASHTA: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ca-m.html#clipless

    The purpose of clipless pedal systems is to deliver the efficiency of toeclips, cleats and straps
    without the downside (namely that when securely strapped in, gettng a foot out can be a challenge).
    SPD are not the only ones on the market. Depending on whether you are road riding or MTBing you can
    also consider Time, Speedplay, Eggbeaters, Look and I'm sure several others.

    I would not want to ride a recumbent without clipless pedals, and I don't like riding any other kind
    of bike without them. Clipless makes it easy to keep power on for more of the pedal stroke, and of
    course it keeps the foot in the right position on the pedal.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
     
  7. Phil Bixby

    Phil Bixby Guest

    > I tried some for a couple of weeks this summer (not SPDs but Time ATACS)
    and
    > loved the feel of them. They made my legs feel like part of the drivetrain rather than just
    > pushing it. Unfortunately they made my knees ache so had
    to
    > come off.

    I can't see a reason why cleated shoes/pedals *in themselves* should cause the aching knees...
    variables to try would be:-

    * Trying aligning them slightly differently to vary the alignment of your feet
    * Try moving them slightly back or forward to vary position of your feet
    * Try more (or less) float so your knees can move a bit if that's what they need (if the type of
    pedals allows this)
    * Try upping your cadence by using one gear lower so your knees don't get strained

    I've been using SPD-SL's for a while and they *do* take some fiddling with to get set up - but well
    worth it for the way effort can then be turned into motion!

    Phil B York, UK
     
  8. Sky Fly

    Sky Fly Guest

    > I would not want to ride a recumbent without clipless pedals, and I don't like riding any other
    > kind of bike without them. Clipless makes it easy to keep power on for more of the pedal stroke,
    > and of course it keeps the foot on the right position on the pedal.

    Good on you, Guy, but I personally find the whole business of having to wear special shoes to ride a
    specially fitted bike a lot of hassle. I prefer to develop my own special style of leg movement in
    which much more power is delivered to the pedals. I know that SPD pedals will always be better than
    whatever I come up with, but then again, I can do without the extra speed.

    --
    Akin

    aknak at aksoto dot idps dot co dot uk
     
  9. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "tony R" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "Budgie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > As a rank amateur, can someone explain the benefit/purpose of SPD pedals. Are special shoes
    > > required to use them?
    >
    > I tried some for a couple of weeks this summer (not SPDs but Time ATACS) and loved the feel of
    > them. They made my legs feel like part of the drivetrain rather than just pushing it.
    > Unfortunately they made my knees ache so had to come off. I didn't fully appreciate the difference
    > they made to my riding until the next day out with the old toeclips. I could have wept. Of course
    > I'd have wept more had I persisted and damaged my knees. I do intend to give them another go
    > though. A little more cautiously this time.

    Different pedals have different amounts of float, and mountain bike type pedals on the whole seem to
    have more float than road type pedals. I'm told the gorgeous-looking but hideously expensive
    speedplay frogs are particularly good for float.

    If you're having knee problems it's possible that just repositioning your cleats would help. If not,
    go for a pedal system with more float.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    do not sail on uphill water
    - Bill Lee
     
  10. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Phil Bixby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > I tried some for a couple of weeks this summer (not SPDs but Time ATACS)
    > and
    > > loved the feel of them. They made my legs feel like part of the
    drivetrain
    > > rather than just pushing it. Unfortunately they made my knees ache so
    had
    > to
    > > come off.
    >
    > I can't see a reason why cleated shoes/pedals *in themselves* should cause the aching knees...
    > variables to try would be:-
    >
    > * Trying aligning them slightly differently to vary the alignment of your feet
    > * Try moving them slightly back or forward to vary position of your feet
    > * Try more (or less) float so your knees can move a bit if that's what
    they
    > need (if the type of pedals allows this)
    > * Try upping your cadence by using one gear lower so your knees don't get strained
    >
    > I've been using SPD-SL's for a while and they *do* take some fiddling with to get set up - but
    > well worth it for the way effort can then be turned
    into
    > motion!

    Oh I know, I know. Unfortunately I only had c. 3 weeks to fiddle before the start of a longish tour.
    As departure neared I decided the risk was too great and so abandoned until a time less pressured.
    Soon, soon....... tony R.
     
  11. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 11:19:00 +0100, "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Good on you, Guy, but I personally find the whole business of having to wear special shoes to ride
    >a specially fitted bike a lot of hassle. I prefer to develop my own special style of leg movement
    >in which much more power is delivered to the pedals. I know that SPD pedals will always be better
    >than whatever I come up with, but then again, I can do without the extra speed.

    My SPDs are made in the training shoe style but why they're made in a horrible dun colour I don't
    know. IIRC, they're Shimano MO36. Some time ago I rode a friend's hybrid bike which was fitted with
    regular pedals. It felt rather strange and slightly dangerous.

    James

    --
    "Sorry mate, I didn't see you" is not a satisfactory excuse.
     
  12. > SPD are not the only
    > ones on the market.

    On road, I love my Look pedals. Cycling is much better with clipless - especially going uphill.

    Cheers, helen s --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get correct one remove
    dependency on fame & fortune h*$el*$$e**nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$ do not
    post my correct 1 on *any* public forum - thanks
     
  13. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    "Budgie" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >| >
    > If you're a powerful rider . . . .
    >|
    >
    >If only! Used to be around 30 years ago, but only used platform pedals and toeclips, then.

    And if you're crap, like me, you need every bit of help going, and the clipless pedals help a lot.

    Steph Fatslowoldbirdonabicycle
     
  14. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:

    > mountain bike type pedals on the whole seem to have more float than road type pedals.

    Not true with the two most common systems. LOOK (road) have more float than SPD when used with the
    usual cleats.

    ~PB
     
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