Speaking of cheese

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by jmcquown, Aug 20, 2005.

  1. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    Anyone familiar with this cheese?

    Jill
    --
    I used to have a handle on life...but it broke off.
     
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  2. JeanineAlyse

    JeanineAlyse Guest

    jmcquown wrote:
    > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    > imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    > in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    > price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    > Anyone familiar with this cheese?

    Jill, I've not heard of this cheese at all, but am anxious to see your
    report on it. I bought a new-to-me just this morning myself. It's
    Havarti Dill, and a slice for "taste test" set me into delighted grins.
    I was curious about using it in place of Provolone when I make the
    greast Foccacia bread, Pesto, Salami, tomatos and lettuce sandwich I
    feed my work crew with, and along with the good amount of dill, it's
    outstanding.

    ....Picky
     
  3. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    JeanineAlyse wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    >> unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across
    >> before - imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be
    >> similar to gouda in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was
    >> small enough that the price was right. I figure this will be nice
    >> for snacking with crackers. Anyone familiar with this cheese?

    >
    > Jill, I've not heard of this cheese at all, but am anxious to see your
    > report on it. I bought a new-to-me just this morning myself. It's
    > Havarti Dill, and a slice for "taste test" set me into delighted
    > grins. I was curious about using it in place of Provolone when I
    > make the
    > greast Foccacia bread, Pesto, Salami, tomatos and lettuce sandwich I
    > feed my work crew with, and along with the good amount of dill, it's
    > outstanding.
    >
    > ...Picky


    When I first read your reply I thought "Dill pickles in cheese? Ewwww!"
    Then I realized you meant the herb :)

    I'll report back on the "butter cheese". I've never seen it before, either!
    It may be why they are only selling small blocks of it, sort of a test run
    for the store.

    Jill
     
  4. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    jmcquown wrote:
    > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    > imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    > in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    > price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    > Anyone familiar with this cheese?


    The spelling ("kaesa") may be incorrect.

    http://www.germanfoods.org/consumer/dairyfacts.cfm

    Sheldon
     
  5. On Sat 20 Aug 2005 06:18:43p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    >> unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before
    >> - imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to
    >> gouda in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough
    >> that the price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with
    >> crackers. Anyone familiar with this cheese?


    I love the butter cheese. I used to buy it at the West Side Market in
    Cleveland. Mostly we ate it with firm German black bread.

    Jill, I've not heard of this cheese at all, but am anxious to see your
    > report on it. I bought a new-to-me just this morning myself. It's
    > Havarti Dill, and a slice for "taste test" set me into delighted grins.
    > I was curious about using it in place of Provolone when I make the
    > greast Foccacia bread, Pesto, Salami, tomatos and lettuce sandwich I
    > feed my work crew with, and along with the good amount of dill, it's
    > outstanding.


    That's another favorite! There's only one shop I found it here in AZ that
    was good. I tried it from a couple of other stores and it had an "off"
    taste. I love dill.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four,
    unless there are three other people.


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  6. kevin

    kevin Guest

    jmcquown wrote on 8/20/2005:

    > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    > imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    > in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    > price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    > Anyone familiar with this cheese?


    A long time ago, I received a Hickory Farms gift pack as an office
    holiday gift. It contained a wedge of butter cheese. I recall that I
    enjoyed it - nice richness - but I never bought any more because I tend
    to prefer a cheese with a bit more stink.
     
  7. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Sat 20 Aug 2005 06:18:43p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >>
    >> jmcquown wrote:
    >>> While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    >>> unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across
    >>> before - imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be
    >>> similar to gouda in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block
    >>> was small enough that the price was right. I figure this will be
    >>> nice for snacking with crackers. Anyone familiar with this cheese?

    >
    > I love the butter cheese. I used to buy it at the West Side Market in
    > Cleveland. Mostly we ate it with firm German black bread.
    >

    I don't have any of that :( But I bought a freshly baked small round loaf
    of rosemary olive oil bread, just because it looked and smelled great!

    > Jill, I've not heard of this cheese at all, but am anxious to see
    > your
    >> report on it. I bought a new-to-me just this morning myself. It's
    >> Havarti Dill, and a slice for "taste test" set me into delighted
    >> grins. I was curious about using it in place of Provolone when I
    >> make the greast Foccacia bread, Pesto, Salami, tomatos and lettuce
    >> sandwich I feed my work crew with, and along with the good amount of
    >> dill, it's outstanding.

    >
    > That's another favorite! There's only one shop I found it here in AZ
    > that was good. I tried it from a couple of other stores and it had
    > an "off" taste. I love dill.
     
  8. Andy

    Andy Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before
    > - imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar
    > to gouda in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small
    > enough that the price was right. I figure this will be nice for
    > snacking with crackers. Anyone familiar with this cheese?
    >
    > Jill



    Jill,

    Nope. Enjoy!

    I awoke to cheese in the form of orange processed American cheese slices
    in my late teens a few decades ago. [sigh]

    Andy
     
  9. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >> While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    >> unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across
    >> before - imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be
    >> similar to gouda in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was
    >> small enough that the price was right. I figure this will be nice
    >> for snacking with crackers. Anyone familiar with this cheese?
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    > Jill,
    >
    > Nope. Enjoy!
    >
    > I awoke to cheese in the form of orange processed American cheese
    > slices in my late teens a few decades ago. [sigh]
    >
    > Andy


    Does this mean you've never tried any other kind of cheese?!

    Jill
     
  10. On Sat 20 Aug 2005 07:11:10p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Sat 20 Aug 2005 06:18:43p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> jmcquown wrote:
    >>>> While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    >>>> unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across
    >>>> before - imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be
    >>>> similar to gouda in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block
    >>>> was small enough that the price was right. I figure this will be
    >>>> nice for snacking with crackers. Anyone familiar with this cheese?

    >>
    >> I love the butter cheese. I used to buy it at the West Side Market in
    >> Cleveland. Mostly we ate it with firm German black bread.
    >>

    > I don't have any of that :( But I bought a freshly baked small round
    > loaf of rosemary olive oil bread, just because it looked and smelled
    > great!


    Yum! That will be just as good...maybe better!



    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four,
    unless there are three other people.


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    Virus Database (VPS): 0533-5, 08/20/2005
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  11. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > jmcquown wrote:
    > > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    > > imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to

    gouda
    > > in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that

    the
    > > price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    > > Anyone familiar with this cheese?

    >
    > The spelling ("kaesa") may be incorrect.
    >
    > http://www.germanfoods.org/consumer/dairyfacts.cfm
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    Kase (sorry, can't do the umlaut, don't know the keys for it) is just German
    for cheese. When American's can't do an umlaut, they usually substitute the
    umlaut for an e, thus, Kaes*. But why did they use an "a" on the end?
    Anyway, never mind. :~) I'm just venting.

    kili
     
  12. Andy

    Andy Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    >> I awoke to cheese in the form of orange processed American cheese
    >> slices in my late teens a few decades ago. [sigh]
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > Does this mean you've never tried any other kind of cheese?!
    >
    > Jill



    Jill,

    No. I've wised up some since the bland ol' days! :)

    Andy
     
  13. jmcquown wrote:
    > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    > imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    > in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    > price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    > Anyone familiar with this cheese?
    >
    > Jill


    Yes, I am familiar with Butterkaese. It is readily available in New
    York City. It is a mild, semi-soft cheese with a buttery taste. It
    is good with crackers or slices of fresh French or Italian bread. I
    have not bought or eaten it in a long time, mostly because I have not
    thought of doing so.

    The price can run from five to ten dollars per pound, depending on
    where you shop and whether or not the cheese is on sale.

    It is the kind of cheese people who think that they do not like any
    kind of cheese, like it upon tasting it. :eek:)
     
  14. AlleyGator

    AlleyGator Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    >unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    >imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    >in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    >price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    >Anyone familiar with this cheese?
    >
    >Jill


    Back in the late seventies there was a decent "gourmet" shop nearby
    and I always ended up with a chunk of "creme kase" or something like
    that. It was excellent with wine of any kind. IIRC it had a mild,
    nutty taste and a very smooth sreamy texture, although it was not a
    "soft" cheese per se.

    --
    The Doc says my brain waves closely match those of a crazed ferret.
    At least now I have an excuse.
     
  15. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 08:50:30 GMT, kilikini wrote:

    >
    > Kase (sorry, can't do the umlaut, don't know the keys for it) is just German
    > for cheese. When American's can't do an umlaut, they usually substitute the
    > umlaut for an e, thus, Kaes*. But why did they use an "a" on the end?


    I dunno.... maybe they're trying to emulate the sound of the word or
    maybe they can't spell. I certainly don't know off the top of my head
    what an umalut does, so it would just be a letter with a symbol to me.

    > Anyway, never mind. :~) I'm just venting.
    >
    > kili


    Do you use Windows? ë would be ctrl + e and " if you'd installed
    AllChars after Wayne mentioned it in another thread.
    http://allchars.zwolnet.com/

    :)
     
  16. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 12:09:58 -0400, Margaret Suran wrote:

    >
    >
    > jmcquown wrote:
    > > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    > > imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    > > in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    > > price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    > > Anyone familiar with this cheese?
    > >
    > > Jill

    >
    > Yes, I am familiar with Butterkaese. It is readily available in New
    > York City. It is a mild, semi-soft cheese with a buttery taste. It
    > is good with crackers or slices of fresh French or Italian bread. I
    > have not bought or eaten it in a long time, mostly because I have not
    > thought of doing so.
    >
    > The price can run from five to ten dollars per pound, depending on
    > where you shop and whether or not the cheese is on sale.
    >
    > It is the kind of cheese people who think that they do not like any
    > kind of cheese, like it upon tasting it. :eek:)


    Sounds like I need to look for it - I like soft cheeses. Will I be
    able to convince my kids to eat the rind? I cringe every time they
    cut the rind off $10lb. brie.
     
  17. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    sf wrote:
    > On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 12:09:58 -0400, Margaret Suran wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > > jmcquown wrote:
    > > > While shopping today I picked up my usual suspects (along with the
    > > > unsuspecting Asiago!). I spotted something I've not run across before -
    > > > imported "German Butter Cheese" (kaesa). It appears to be similar to gouda
    > > > in colour and texture (semi-soft) and the block was small enough that the
    > > > price was right. I figure this will be nice for snacking with crackers.
    > > > Anyone familiar with this cheese?
    > > >
    > > > Jill

    > >
    > > Yes, I am familiar with Butterkaese. It is readily available in New
    > > York City. It is a mild, semi-soft cheese with a buttery taste. It
    > > is good with crackers or slices of fresh French or Italian bread. I
    > > have not bought or eaten it in a long time, mostly because I have not
    > > thought of doing so.
    > >
    > > The price can run from five to ten dollars per pound, depending on
    > > where you shop and whether or not the cheese is on sale.
    > >
    > > It is the kind of cheese people who think that they do not like any
    > > kind of cheese, like it upon tasting it. :eek:)

    >
    > Sounds like I need to look for it - I like soft cheeses. Will I be
    > able to convince my kids to eat the rind? I cringe every time they
    > cut the rind off $10lb. brie.


    Then don't do that, cut off their rind and eat it yourself, then give
    them nekid brie. Anyway, from your description you're wasting your
    dollars, they're not nearly sophisticated enough for brie, your kids
    would probably much prefer $3/lb Velveeta. I think Velveeta has a
    white version now (no dye), slice off small wedges and tell them it's
    American brie

    Sheldon
     
  18. pjjehg

    pjjehg Guest

    "JeanineAlyse"wrote ...
    > Jill, I've not heard of this cheese at all, but am anxious to see your
    > report on it. I bought a new-to-me just this morning myself. It's
    > Havarti Dill, and a slice for "taste test" set me into delighted grins.
    > I was curious about using it in place of Provolone when I make the
    > greast Foccacia bread, Pesto, Salami, tomatos and lettuce sandwich I
    > feed my work crew with, and along with the good amount of dill, it's
    > outstanding.
    >
    > ...Picky
    >

    Re Havarti, it's best eaten at room temperature. At that point, you can
    very easily spread it.

    Pam
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    "pjjehg" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "JeanineAlyse"wrote ...
    > > Jill, I've not heard of this cheese at all, but am anxious to see your
    > > report on it. I bought a new-to-me just this morning myself. It's
    > > Havarti Dill, and a slice for "taste test" set me into delighted grins.
    > > I was curious about using it in place of Provolone when I make the
    > > greast Foccacia bread, Pesto, Salami, tomatos and lettuce sandwich I
    > > feed my work crew with, and along with the good amount of dill, it's
    > > outstanding.
    > >
    > > ...Picky
    > >

    > Re Havarti, it's best eaten at room temperature. At that point, you can
    > very easily spread it.
    >
    > Pam
    >
    >


    Very true. :)
    It's great on Sourdough with just a little butter.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
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