Speaking of cutting brake/der cables without fraying......

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jpinkowish, Mar 23, 2003.

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  1. Jpinkowish

    Jpinkowish Guest

    If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques to prevent fraying? Cables I'm
    using are Dura Ace cables.

    As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then cut.

    Yes / no? Suggestions?

    Jan Pinkowish Bristol, CT
     
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  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Jpinkowish" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques to
    prevent
    > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    >
    > As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then cut.
    >
    > Yes / no? Suggestions?
    >
    > Jan Pinkowish Bristol, CT

    I have good luck with just plain, good quality side-cutters. I like the correct tool, but just don't
    have it. I just cut with side-cutters and re-wrap the cable. It usually doesn't fray to any great
    degree and I can crimp on a cable-end and the job is pretty clean. I do have problems with braided
    cables although I've had some problems cutting them with proper cable cutters as well.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  3. Wantagofast

    Wantagofast Guest

    I put a spoke nipple on the wire where I want it, with the nipple head to the waist side, and then
    just cut it with a good pair of linesman pliers. Then I put a slight crimp in the nipple to help
    ensure it stays on in lieu of using a cable end.

    "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Jpinkowish" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques to
    > prevent
    > > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    > >
    > > As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then
    cut.
    > >
    > > Yes / no? Suggestions?
    > >
    > > Jan Pinkowish Bristol, CT
    >
    > I have good luck with just plain, good quality side-cutters. I like the correct tool, but just
    > don't have it. I just cut with side-cutters and re-wrap the cable. It usually doesn't fray to any
    > great degree and I can crimp on a cable-end and the job is pretty clean. I do have problems with
    > braided cables although I've had some problems cutting them with proper cable cutters as well.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Scott..
     
  4. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Solder mid-wire, cut soldered area

    > > > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques
    to
    > > prevent
    > > > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    >
     
  5. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Jeff who? writes:

    > Solder mid-wire, cut soldered area

    Have you done this? I think you'll find that unless you silver solder or braze, this will splay
    the wire irrecoverably rather than springing back into round after cutting with a good pair of
    diagonal cutters.

    Wrapping the cable in tape only hides what would otherwise be visible when using diagonal cutters.

    By the way. Don't use cutters made for electronics. They are sharp and intended for cutting
    copper wire cleanly. Using them for steel control cables will destroy the cutting edges and not
    cut the cable.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  6. Jt

    Jt Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Jeff who? writes:
    >
    > > Solder mid-wire, cut soldered area
    >
    > Have you done this? I think you'll find that unless you silver solder or braze, this will splay
    > the wire irrecoverably rather than springing back into round after cutting with a good pair of
    > diagonal cutters.
    >
    > Wrapping the cable in tape only hides what would otherwise be visible when using diagonal cutters.
    >
    > By the way. Don't use cutters made for electronics. They are sharp and intended for cutting
    > copper wire cleanly. Using them for steel control cables will destroy the cutting edges and not
    > cut the cable.
    >

    I find a pair of "aviation" snips work well, on plain unsoldered cable. The serrations keep the
    wires from spreading when you cut, plus they are meant for cutting steel, and have a good bit
    of leverage.
     
  7. David Belbin

    David Belbin Guest

    Keeping scraps of cable outer, slipping onto cable, and snipping through both always works for me.
    Solder end, or crimp on a spoke nipple to prevent fraying.

    --
    Regards David. "jt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Jeff who? writes:
    > >
    > > > Solder mid-wire, cut soldered area
    > >
    > > Have you done this? I think you'll find that unless you silver solder or braze, this will splay
    > > the wire irrecoverably rather than springing back into round after cutting with a good pair of
    > > diagonal cutters.
    > >
    > > Wrapping the cable in tape only hides what would otherwise be visible when using diagonal
    > > cutters.
    > >
    > > By the way. Don't use cutters made for electronics. They are sharp and intended for cutting
    > > copper wire cleanly. Using them for steel control cables will destroy the cutting edges and not
    > > cut the cable.
    > >
    >
    > I find a pair of "aviation" snips work well, on plain unsoldered cable.
    The
    > serrations keep the wires from spreading when you cut, plus they are meant for cutting steel, and
    > have a good bit of leverage.
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques to
    prevent
    >fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables. As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly
    >with tape, then cut. Yes / no? Suggestions?

    I use a dremel tool with a cut off wheel. I can cut casing and cables quite easily with this tool.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  9. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]
    > says...
    > >If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques to
    > prevent
    > >fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables. As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap
    > >tightly with tape, then cut. Yes / no? Suggestions?
    >
    > I use a dremel tool with a cut off wheel. I can cut casing and cables
    quite
    > easily with this tool.
    > -----------------
    I actually tried this and found that I have better luck cutting the casing (brake) with (Shimano)
    cutters, then trimming the ends of the casing with the Dremel, or better: a bench grinder. Haven't
    tried it with shifter casing yet.

    I bought my Shimano cutter about 8 years ago and it is just now starting to get a little funky when
    I'm cutting cables. Is there a way to sharpen the blades of the Shimano cutters?

    Mike

    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  10. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "Jpinkowish" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques
    to prevent
    > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    >
    > As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then
    cut.
    >
    > Yes / no? Suggestions?

    I've cut gear cables on the fly with a screwdriver and a rock -- and in the dark days, I just used
    wire-cutters for all cables. For anything more than a one-time job, however, you should buy the Park
    or Shimano cable cutters. They will last a long time and you will not have to buy side-cutters,
    aviation cutters, solder, Dremel tools, impact hammers, die cutters, punch presses, CNC mill, etc.
    etc. or any of the other home remedies suggested in this thread. Good cable/housing cutters should
    be on your short list of must have home tools -- unless you are McGuyver and like to fix your bike
    with kitchen utensils and what-have-you. My God, you have Dura Ace cables -- you can afford a decent
    cutter! -- Jay Beattie.
     
  11. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >>If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques to
    >
    > prevent
    >
    >>fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables. As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap
    >>tightly with tape, then cut. Yes / no? Suggestions?
    >
    >
    > I use a dremel tool with a cut off wheel. I can cut casing and cables quite easily with this tool.
    > -----------------
    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
    >

    I tried that once and it frayed the heck out the cable. Never again.

    David
     
  12. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    > For anything more than a one-time job, however, you should buy the Park or Shimano cable cutters.
    > They will last a long time and you will not have to buy side-cutters, aviation cutters, solder,
    > Dremel tools, impact hammers, >die
    cutters, punch presses, CNC mill, etc. etc. or any of the other home
    >remedies suggested in this thread.

    I have a set of Shimano cable cutters but I use high quality diagonal cutters, they last forever and
    they can be used for many other jobs than just cutting bicycle cables.

    One pair I have started its life in the late 60s cutting galvantized 11 gage wire for lobster traps.
    After it got lost on the boat, it rusted up and it took a propane torch, WD-40 and some serious
    effort to free it up.

    But here it, more than 30 years later still cutting bicycle cables, pulling nails or doing any one
    of the jobs that a good pair of heavy duty diagonal cutters can do admirably.

    jon isaacs
     
  13. "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Jpinkowish" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques
    > to prevent
    > > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    > >
    > > As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then
    > cut.
    > >
    > > Yes / no? Suggestions?
    >
    > I've cut gear cables on the fly with a screwdriver and a rock -- and in the dark days, I just used
    > wire-cutters for all cables. For anything more than a one-time job, however, you should buy the
    > Park or Shimano cable cutters. They will last a long time and you will not have to buy
    > side-cutters, aviation cutters, solder, Dremel tools, impact hammers, die cutters, punch presses,
    > CNC mill, etc. etc. or any of the other home remedies suggested in this thread. Good cable/housing
    > cutters should be on your short list of must have home tools -- unless you are McGuyver and like
    > to fix your bike with kitchen utensils and what-have-you. My God, you have Dura Ace cables -- you
    > can afford a decent cutter! -- Jay Beattie.

    There is lots of good advice above. I'd just add that while cable cutters do a great job on cables,
    they do not do as well on housings. Usually, additional treatment, such as grinding the trimmed
    housing end, is necessary. So, unless one has access to a bench grinder or a Dremmel tool, the cable
    cutter won't satisfy completely.

    Regarding soldering, liquid acid flux works well. Rosen flux does not. My soldering iron runs at
    about 30 watts. It has barely enough power to do ss cables.

    Steve Shapiro
     
  14. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > "Jpinkowish" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques
    > > to prevent
    > > > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    > > >
    > > > As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then
    > > cut.

    > "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I've cut gear cables on the fly with a screwdriver and a rock -- and in the dark days, I just
    > > used wire-cutters for all cables. For anything more than a one-time job, however, you should buy
    > > the Park or Shimano cable cutters. They will last a long time and you will not have to buy
    > > side-cutters, aviation cutters, solder, Dremel tools, impact hammers, die cutters, punch
    > > presses, CNC mill, etc. etc. or any of the other home remedies suggested in this thread. Good
    > > cable/housing cutters should be on your short list of must have home tools -- unless you are
    > > McGuyver and like to fix your bike with kitchen utensils and what-have-you. My God, you have
    > > Dura Ace cables -- you can afford a decent cutter! -- Jay

    "Steve Shapiro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > There is lots of good advice above. I'd just add that while cable cutters do a great job on
    > cables, they do not do as well on housings. Usually, additional treatment, such as grinding the
    > trimmed housing end, is necessary. So, unless one has access to a bench grinder or a Dremmel tool,
    > the cable cutter won't satisfy completely.
    >
    > Regarding soldering, liquid acid flux works well. Rosen flux does not. My soldering iron runs at
    > about 30 watts. It has barely enough power to do ss cables.

    I don't know anything about soldering control wires but regarding cutting, a Felco, Var or similar
    diamond-shaped cutter is ideal for wires and gear casing. That type of cutter isn't appropriate to
    brake casing where a simple end cutter or diagonal cutter is best. One can easily trim spiral casing
    to a nice clean edge with a sharp simple cutter without resorting to a grindwheel or a rotary file.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  15. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > "Jpinkowish" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate
    techniques
    > > > to prevent
    > > > > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    > > > >
    > > > > As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape,
    then
    > > > cut.
    >
    > > "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > I've cut gear cables on the fly with a screwdriver and a rock --
    and in
    > > > the dark days, I just used wire-cutters for all cables. For
    anything
    > > > more than a one-time job, however, you should buy the Park or
    Shimano
    > > > cable cutters. They will last a long time and you will not have
    to buy
    > > > side-cutters, aviation cutters, solder, Dremel tools, impact
    hammers,
    > > > die cutters, punch presses, CNC mill, etc. etc. or any of the
    other home
    > > > remedies suggested in this thread. Good cable/housing cutters
    should be
    > > > on your short list of must have home tools -- unless you are
    McGuyver
    > > > and like to fix your bike with kitchen utensils and what-have-you.
    My
    > > > God, you have Dura Ace cables -- you can afford a decent
    cutter! -- Jay
    >
    >
    > "Steve Shapiro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > There is lots of good advice above. I'd just add that while cable cutters do a great job on
    > > cables, they do not do as well on
    housings.
    > > Usually, additional treatment, such as grinding the trimmed housing end, is necessary. So,
    > > unless one has access to a bench grinder or a Dremmel tool, the cable cutter won't satisfy
    > > completely.
    > >
    > > Regarding soldering, liquid acid flux works well. Rosen flux does not. My soldering iron runs at
    > > about 30 watts. It has barely
    enough
    > > power to do ss cables.
    >
    > I don't know anything about soldering control wires but regarding
    cutting, a
    > Felco, Var or similar diamond-shaped cutter is ideal for wires and
    gear
    > casing. That type of cutter isn't appropriate to brake casing where a simple end cutter or
    > diagonal cutter is best. One can easily trim
    spiral
    > casing to a nice clean edge with a sharp simple cutter without
    resorting to
    > a grindwheel or a rotary file.

    I was a little too emphatic about the Park and Shimano cutters since the Var and Felco are the same
    type of thing, and Var has always made good tools (and the Park is pretty junky by comparison). I
    have never used the Felco, but it looks like the Rolls Royce of cutters -- and is priced similarly
    for the top of the product line. -- Jay Beattie.
     
  16. jpinkowish-<< As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then cut.

    Nope, cut, trim, install to seat the housing, compress the housing as much as possible, then wrap-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  17. "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > "Jpinkowish" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > If you don't have the bike shop tool, are there alternate techniques
    > to prevent
    > > > > fraying? Cables I'm using are Dura Ace cables.
    > > > >
    > > > > As I'm writing this, I'm thinking first wrap tightly with tape, then
    > > > cut.
    >
    > > "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > I've cut gear cables on the fly with a screwdriver and a rock -- and in the dark days, I just
    > > > used wire-cutters for all cables. For anything more than a one-time job, however, you should
    > > > buy the Park or Shimano cable cutters. They will last a long time and you will not have to buy
    > > > side-cutters, aviation cutters, solder, Dremel tools, impact hammers, die cutters, punch
    > > > presses, CNC mill, etc. etc. or any of the other home remedies suggested in this thread. Good
    > > > cable/housing cutters should be on your short list of must have home tools -- unless you are
    > > > McGuyver and like to fix your bike with kitchen utensils and what-have-you. My God, you have
    > > > Dura Ace cables -- you can afford a decent cutter! -- Jay
    >
    >
    > "Steve Shapiro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > There is lots of good advice above. I'd just add that while cable cutters do a great job on
    > > cables, they do not do as well on housings. Usually, additional treatment, such as grinding the
    > > trimmed housing end, is necessary. So, unless one has access to a bench grinder or a Dremmel
    > > tool, the cable cutter won't satisfy completely.
    > >
    > > Regarding soldering, liquid acid flux works well. Rosen flux does not. My soldering iron runs at
    > > about 30 watts. It has barely enough power to do ss cables.
    >
    > I don't know anything about soldering control wires but regarding cutting, a Felco, Var or similar
    > diamond-shaped cutter is ideal for wires and gear casing. That type of cutter isn't appropriate to
    > brake casing where a simple end cutter or diagonal cutter is best. One can easily trim spiral
    > casing to a nice clean edge with a sharp simple cutter without resorting to a grindwheel or a
    > rotary file.

    The job of cutting cables and housings requires more then one tool despite what tool manufacturers
    and retailers may lead us to believe. That is the point I inadequately tried to make. (An exception
    is a Dremmel tool that can cut both cleanly, but it costs more than several cutters.)

    A competent shop would have fine hand tools for these jobs. At home, folks may choose to improvise
    depending on what's handy and how much they want to spend on tools. The Park cutter works great on
    my cables and will make enough cuts to last my lifetime. I do not need the more expensive Var or
    Felco tools, but it is nice to know that they exist.

    Soldering can make a clean neat wire end that will not unravel. It allows easy threading of the
    cable in and out. But it does not add much value vs. the quicker to apply crimp cap so I'd never
    expect a shop to solder cables. On the other hand, I'd never go out and buy soldering paraphernalia
    just to do cable ends. But if it is handy, and time is not an issue, why not use it? Earlier posters
    noted problems getting the solder to flow into the cables. Since I experienced the problem, then
    learned a solution and used it, I mentioned the result.

    A good thing about buying cables and housings from my lbs is that they throw in a few ferrules and
    end caps with each purchase. It's a nice gesture that I appreciate. I use the caps. That's how
    committed to soldering I am.

    I do want to say that I learn more from the professionals and experienced folks who post to this
    group then from any other source. I appreciate the time taken to write and value the knowledge and
    experience that goes into the postings.

    Steve Shapiro
     
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