Specialized crossroads or diamondback trace?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Jaxxgirl76, Mar 15, 2020.

  1. Jaxxgirl76

    Jaxxgirl76 New Member

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    I recently bought 2 bikes at a very reasonable cost for some light trail riding and small commuting 2 miles or less each way from my home. The 1st one I bought was a specialized crossroads and I love this bike but a 2012 Diamondback trace recently caught my eye. My question is which bike would be the best For what I do which is the commuting and light trails? Do I stick with a specialized or go with the Diamondback or do I just keep both? Also, how do I tell what year the specialized bike is? Can't tell just from looking.
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Both the spec cross and the DB trace comes in several versions. This means that w/o knowing which version - or failing that, the specification of each bike - it’s difficult to advise.
    What year a bike is generally isn’t that important. Spares and service parts are bought according to what’s on the bike rather than according to year. If the spec is also about the same age as the DB, it doesn’t influence resale value much either.
    If you have them both, why not simply ride and decide which one you like best? None of them have much bling value.
     
  3. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    The Diamondback model suspension fork which will be of lousy quality, it will weight a lot, cannot act fact enough to be truly and off road fork, and won't last long, a replacement quality fork will cost you nearly as much as you paid for the bike. In addition to that cheap suspensions forks, and good ones too but not as much, requires a lot more watts, ie more energy to propel the bike forward, than a rigid fork, and since you will only being doing light trails you have NO NEED for a suspension fork! Really the only type of riding a suspension fork is good for is fast down hill technical riding. I use to live in California and rode many mountain trails and all I rode was a rigid mountain bike, meaning no front or rear suspension, and I was able to keep up with guys who had suspension forks. So toss the Diamondback away.

    So you're probably wondering if what I said is true why does the vast majority of mountain bikes have suspension forks? it's because they are marketing those bikes toward the male population mostly, and a suspension fork looks macho, it looks manly, and people that buy those bikes for under $500 don't have a clue about bikes anyways! There are fat tire bikes with rigid forks at that price but those are very heavy a that price, and takes a lot wattage to propel a fat tire bike like it does for a suspension fork.

    So that leaves you with the Specialized that has a rigid fork, these types of bikes are known as hybrid bikes and not mountain bikes, so you need to fine tune your shopping toward hybrid.

    You can get a slightly better component package over the Specialized if you look at the Diamondback Insight 2, it comes with the next step up from Shimano Tourney (the bottom of the line derailleurs) to Altus, and trust me Altus works a lot better, there is a day and night difference between those two!

    Other options is the Raleigh Cadent 2, Fuji Crosstown 2.3, for about $100 more there is the Cannondale Quick (great frame but Shimano Tourney stuff that can be inexpensively replaced when they fail), and the Trek Verve 1 disk.
     
  4. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    I do XC MTB, often marathon distances. While rideable on a rigid, that kind of stuff gets a lot kinder - and more enjoyable - on your wrists and shoulders with a (decent) sus fork.
    I’d have to really put an effort in to care about how manly my bike looks. Offer me a bike that’s a good fit and a performance upgrade, and I’ll ride it even if it’s sparkly and pink and has unicorns on it.
    But in general terms I agree with what you say, there’s a lot of shopping going on based on image and perception.
     
  5. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Commuting 2 miles or less?

    Save your money and wondering. Ride what you have, it's plenty good for what you do. My wife had a Specialized Crossroads and loved it. Many many 25-40 mile rides without any issues.

    You're spending more time and energy thinking about this issue than riding. You have a plenty good bike for what you are doing, and much much more. Get a good saddle, good shorts and take your bike out for a 25 mile ride. :)
     
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