Specialized Dolce Comp

Discussion in 'Women's Cycling' started by Fitmiss, Oct 14, 2004.

  1. Fitmiss

    Fitmiss New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm waiting for the 2005 Dolce Comp model to be available. It should be out soon. I am a new rider but decided that I wanted to buy a nice bike. I work out alot, take spin classes, so I believe a good bike will not go to waste.

    I am about 5'2" (maybe a tad under) and have basically been fitted for the 48 CM size. I was wondering if anyone else is riding a 2004 or 2003 Dolce comp. I'm looking for feedback on your experience with this bike.

    I have read all the feedback on the 700c vs 650c tires. The Trek 2100 or 2200 WSD is a nice bike but I think a 47 CM bike with a 650 tire would take me pretty low to the ground. I remember standing over a 51 CM and didn't have much clearance so I am probably in between sizes on the Trek. I might still take a test drive.

    Basically, unless the ride is uncomfortable, I'm really interested in the Specialized Dolce Comp.

    Any feedback?
     
    Tags:


  2. skydive69

    skydive69 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think you made a great choice and will be very happy. My girlfriend has been riding for a few years, and she test rode a lot of bikes (many more expensive than the Dolce), and we wound up ordering her a Dolce Comp (44 CM - she is 5 foot even). It is very nicely equipped, and if you really get into it, you will not have to upgrade. When I started, I made the mistake of going downscale (Sequoia Elite), wound up going nuts over biking, and up purchased a Roubaix Pro. The bike has great ergonomics for women riders.
     
  3. ChiliDog

    ChiliDog New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi!

    I think we've talked on another forum...I wound up with a Specialized Sequoia Elite (2003, Ultegra) for the comfort of the ride and the 700 wheelset. Not sure why the previous poster feels a Sequoia is "down scale", but whatever floats your boat...

    You could fit on an XS Sequoia, get the 700 wheels, and max out the components. Just another consideration.

    Best to test ride the ones you're interested in, of course, and make your decision based on fit and comfort more than anything else.
     
  4. Fitmiss

    Fitmiss New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes, Chilidog, we have spoken on bikeforums.net Being a tad under 5'2" I really believe I need a WSD bike. I don't believe there is a WSD Sequoia. Soon I'll have the opportunity to do some test riding if it isn't too cold!

    Thanks for the feedback.
     
  5. skydive69

    skydive69 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't mistake my comment about "downscale" as denegrating the Sequoia Elite. I still have mine, and I ride it once a week. I think it is the best entry level, and most comfortable bike on the market. It is just that I considered upgrading to a Roubaix Pro going upscale, and had I known that I was going to get so deeply into cycling, I would have started there.
     
  6. ChiliDog

    ChiliDog New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Interesting...what makes a Roubaix Pro more "upscale" than a Sequoia? Just a challenge to your thinking. Is the Allez less "upscale" than a Roubaix Pro? The price of the bike does not make it "upscale" in itself. The quality and price of the components, frame, and wheelset might lead to this definition. In that regard, there is nothing "entry level" about an 03 Sequoia Elite road bike. It's a compact frame, like the other Specialized bikes, and it's outfitted with high end components and so forth. Sweet riding frame too.

    Wish I had started out on a compact frame that FITS and gone on and gotten the full Ultegra as a lifetime "keeper". As it was, I started on a traditional geometry frame with 105. It was very sweet, but the bike did not fit me. Guess we all learn by experimentation and practice (and pain).

    Some Sequoias, Allez, and other bikes offer high end components and wheelsets. My Sequoia is Ultegra with a higher end (price/design) Shimano wheelset on it. I've owned an Allez Sport (105/Tiagra/Alexrims) and an Allez Comp (Mavic Ksyriums, full Ultegra) and a Trek 2200 (105, Rolf Vectors).

    The most expensive was the Allez Comp, but it was also the worst "fit" I've ever had on a bike. If a bike doesn't fit you, it doesn't matter how much it costs or what components are on it. A person can be a "serious" roadie on Sora and a low end frame and Alex wheelset (or less). But the bike has to "fit" first.

    Because I am so "deeply into cycling" I have learned in the last 4 years to get what FITS, not what is attractive or is the most expensive or cool-looking bike going. (and I do think my ride is cool-looking and beautiful).

    And then the second crucial part is to ride the crap out of it and become an accomplished rider. A person won't do that unless the bike is comfortable and fits them properly. Getting an expensive road bike and riding it just because they believe it will somehow make them a "serious" cyclist, does not make them a serious cyclist. Time in the saddle and passion make that happen, no matter what you're riding. And who is going to put time in the saddle if the bike is uncomfortable? :D

    Since I have no need for Dura Ace, about the only upgrade that might happen on my bike (after the original ones crap out) is the wheelset. I prefer a 32 spoke set-up for the long haul, but I will ride these Shimanos for the upcoming season, unless I have problems with them.

    I think the R. Pro is a nice ride too. Just get it for the right reasons...fits better, better frame, wheelset, components...a keeper if it "FITS"! LOL

    How many times did I say the word "fits"? That is my point...duh! ;)

    Happy trails...
     
  7. ChiliDog

    ChiliDog New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Using the "Fit Kit" I was set up to a Trek WSD 51cm or a Sequoia Small. Exact same fit for me with a 29" inseam, 5'4", and shorter arms. Just a suggestion to try out something with 700cc wheels that you might not have considered before. Plus, the Sequoia handlebar/stem offers a good bit of adjustability, if you like that.

    Good luck in finding your ride!
    CD
     
  8. skydive69

    skydive69 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    0
    We have no argument. Both my Sequoia and Roubaix were "fitted" to me, and then very carefully adjusted from everything down to the cleat position on my shoes. I concur that one should ride a properly fitted bike.

    Again, I love my Sequoia Elite even though it is fitted with only 105 components. Going to full Dura-Ace, CF frame, Ti pedals, a new Alias saddle fitted to my sit bones (comes in three sizes) is certainly going "upscale" the difference in price of a couple thousand plus dollars notwithstanding. My recommendation to anyone who wants to do serious, fast, long and fun cycling would be to buy a Sequoia. My recommendation to someone who wants to take it a step farther and win the sprints on the club ride, climb hills effortlessly, and spin with unimaginable smoothness and comfort would be to "go upscale" to a Roubaix. My average speed per ride went up noticeably when I started riding my Roubaix. Yes, the computer is set up quite accurately to my wheel size.

    Having said that, and again being a fan of the Sequoia, I was never once complimented on my ride when I had the Sequoia on club rides. Virtually every ride now, someone compliments me on my ride (usually after getting a long look at the rear of my bike during the sprint sections of our ride).
     
  9. ChiliDog

    ChiliDog New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Whatever makes you happy...


    (BTW, the 03 Sequoia Elite came with Ultegra)
     
  10. Fitmiss

    Fitmiss New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    I need a 48 cm bike. The Dolce has the 700c wheels. I would have loved to tryout a Trek but really don't want the 650c wheels. I don't think there are any Trek WSD frames in my size with the 700c wheels. The WSD bike not only changes the size of the frame, it also dictates the size of other components such as handlebars, stem, etc.

    Hopefully I'll get the fit right!
     
  11. cannongirl

    cannongirl New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2004
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do yourself a favor and get professionaly fitted, the stand-over height is very important, however, in my opinion, the top-tube length is just as important, you can't tell whether a bike will fit correctly simply by standing over it or having a guy in a bike shop hold it as he tells you to Peddle backwards.

    If you're brand new to road biking you need to make an educated guess as what you're going to do with it, ie, Centuries, short rides with friends, racing etc etc, this will help your LBS decide your frame size.

    If the top tube length is too long or too short for you you'll have big problems later on.
    Too long, you'll be stretched out, this will cause arm fatique as well as hand problems, neck and shoulder aches and pains etc etc.

    My best advice os to pay the $50-100 an LBS normally charges, have them put a bike on a trainer and fit you correctly...

    I'm sorry, I can't comment on a Dolce, I've never ridden one, but in any case, what suits me may not suit you ;-)

    Have fun bike shopping!!

     
  12. Fitmiss

    Fitmiss New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Actually, I just stopped in a bike shop the other day and one of the guys took my measurements. I have a 75.5 cm inseam and need a 50 cm top tube. The cannondale for example has a 51 cm top tube in the size that fits my stand-over height. The Trek and the Specialized offer bikes that are a better fit for me.

    Thanks for the input.


     
Loading...
Loading...