Spectro S7 back-pedal brakes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ronnie101, Jun 29, 2003.

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  1. Ronnie101

    Ronnie101 New Member

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    I have a Dutch bike with a Sachs Spectro S7 hub fitted with horrible rear brakes that work by back-pedalling instead of a handlebar lever.

    How easy is it to alter the hub to inhibit the back-pedal brakes and gain the normal operation of being able to rotate the pedals backwards whenever you like?

    It's so dangerous like it is - you always come to rest at a kerb with the pedal shafts vertical - which is wrong for starting off, but you can't move the pedals because of the demented back-pedal rear brake design.
     
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  2. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Ronnie101" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Dutch bike with a Sachs Spectro S7 hub fitted with horrible rear brakes that work by
    > back-pedalling instead of a handlebar lever.
    >
    > How easy is it to alter the hub to inhibit the back-pedal brakes and gain the normal operation of
    > being able to rotate the pedals backwards whenever you like?
    >
    > It's so dangerous like it is - you always come to rest at a kerb with the pedal shafts vertical -
    > which is wrong for starting off, but you can't move the pedals because of the demented back-pedal
    > rear brake design.

    Return it to your dealer for the other model with no brake or the model with a cable/drum brake. All
    three models are equally available.

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  3. On 30 Jun 2003 03:01:51 +0950, Ronnie101 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How easy is it to alter the hub to inhibit the back-pedal brakes and gain the normal operation of
    >being able to rotate the pedals backwards whenever you like?

    I'm assuming you do have regular brakes fitted?

    >It's so dangerous like it is - you always come to rest at a kerb with the pedal shafts vertical -
    >which is wrong for starting off, but you can't move the pedals because of the demented back-pedal
    >rear brake design.

    And the reason you can't move yourself with bike half a foot or a foot forward is...? I dunno 'bout
    you, but I learned to ride on a coaster brake bike, and while it has emphatically not been my
    preference ever since I tried handoperated brakes, mainly because coaster brake = locking up the
    wheel in any heavy braking, it's not that hard to live with one, especially if you don't have to use
    it to brake.

    Jasper
     
  4. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Ronnie101 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have a Dutch bike with a Sachs Spectro S7 hub fitted with horrible rear brakes that work by
    > back-pedalling instead of a handlebar lever.

    In my experience those brakes work just fine. I have equipped a few bikes with the 5-speed variation
    of the same hub.

    > How easy is it to alter the hub to inhibit the back-pedal brakes and gain the normal operation of
    > being able to rotate the pedals backwards whenever you like?

    The term is "coaster brake".

    That hub can't easily be modified to neutralize the rear coaster brake, though it may be
    possible in principle. Furthermore, the way a coaster brake operates _is_ normal and has been
    for over 100 years.

    > It's so dangerous like it is - you always come to rest at a kerb with the pedal shafts vertical -
    > which is wrong for starting off, but you can't move the pedals because of the demented back-pedal
    > rear brake design.

    There is nothing dangerous about the brake. Your failure to develop appropriate habits to properly
    operate a coaster brake are not the shortcoming of that design. For generations many high-quality
    bikes were equipped solely with a coaster brake, and without accompanying implications for their
    safe operation, so I'd say the malfunction is in the control system and not in the drivetrain.

    Just like the computer programmer's proverb goes, "garbage in, garbage out". A coater brake has a
    very simple set of principles, and never fails to abide by them when in good (or even not-so-good)
    repair. Just as there is nothing intrinsically "wrong" with a rim brake even though some might find
    its cable to be a nuisance, there is nothing intrinsically wrong with a coaster brake either.

    I have even seen cases where riders employed some kind of one-way clutch in order to operate a rim
    brake in the manner of a coaster brake. They obviously found nothing wrong with the operation of a
    coaster brake.

    I would love to see your thoughts about a fixed-gear bike after trying out one of those!

    Chalo Colina
     
  5. Marcus Coles

    Marcus Coles Guest

    Chalo wrote:
    > Ronnie101 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I have a Dutch bike with a Sachs Spectro S7 hub fitted with horrible rear brakes that work by
    >>back-pedalling instead of a handlebar lever.
    >
    >
    > In my experience those brakes work just fine. I have equipped a few bikes with the 5-speed
    > variation of the same hub.
    >
    >
    >>How easy is it to alter the hub to inhibit the back-pedal brakes and gain the normal operation of
    >>being able to rotate the pedals backwards whenever you like?
    >
    >
    > The term is "coaster brake".
    >
    > That hub can't easily be modified to neutralize the rear coaster brake, though it may be
    > possible in principle. Furthermore, the way a coaster brake operates _is_ normal and has been
    > for over 100 years.
    >
    >
    >>It's so dangerous like it is - you always come to rest at a kerb with the pedal shafts vertical -
    >>which is wrong for starting off, but you can't move the pedals because of the demented back-pedal
    >>rear brake design.
    >
    >
    > There is nothing dangerous about the brake. Your failure to develop appropriate habits to properly
    > operate a coaster brake are not the shortcoming of that design. For generations many high-quality
    > bikes were equipped solely with a coaster brake, and without accompanying implications for their
    > safe operation, so I'd say the malfunction is in the control system and not in the drivetrain.
    >
    > Just like the computer programmer's proverb goes, "garbage in, garbage out". A coater brake has a
    > very simple set of principles, and never fails to abide by them when in good (or even not-so-good)
    > repair. Just as there is nothing intrinsically "wrong" with a rim brake even though some might
    > find its cable to be a nuisance, there is nothing intrinsically wrong with a coaster brake either.
    >
    > I have even seen cases where riders employed some kind of one-way clutch in order to operate a rim
    > brake in the manner of a coaster brake. They obviously found nothing wrong with the operation of a
    > coaster brake.
    >
    > I would love to see your thoughts about a fixed-gear bike after trying out one of those!
    >
    > Chalo Colina

    I was not exposed to coaster brakes until the age of 12, prior to that I had only used rod brakes
    and cable operated calipers.

    I too suffered from operator error and can still remember squeezing desperately on the handle bar
    grips a few times.

    While the coaster brake is embedded in North American culture and is therefore second nature to
    those growing up there, its operation does not come automatically to those who were not exposed to
    it from day one.

    The coaster brake is indeed a rugged device. It has to be being the sole braking device on
    many bicycles.

    Rear wheel only braking is not really that effective unless one's goal is it lay down the longest
    patch of rubber.

    Having said that I do own a couple of coaster brake bikes, one a Torpedo 3 speed and have grown to
    appreciate the simplicity. I would not want to ride them much over 20kph in heavy traffic due to the
    limited braking performance. I also have no desire to ride a fixed gear in similar conditions,
    having bounced one off the back corner of a bus in my youth.

    Marcus
     
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