speed machine vs. giro or strada or corsa

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Bill, Feb 9, 2003.

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  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    I am considering the purchase of my first bent. I have tried the strada and the giro. I really
    thought the giro was fun and the strada was initially more difficult to ride. That said I am
    convinced I could get comfortable on the Strada with some practice.

    My question is how does the Speed Machine compare with the Bacchetta bikes?

    I know the Speed Machine is heavier by almost ten pounds. Unfortunately, I have not had the
    opportunity to ride it. But it looks great and the suspension is very appealing. My other concern is
    how it would handle hills given the extra weight?

    I would appreciate any opinions, especially from those with experience riding the speed machine and
    the Bacchetta bikes. I should also mention that I live in Brookline, MA which is adjacent to Boston
    and some of my riding will be on city streets.

    Thanks in advance.

    Bill
     
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  2. [This followup was posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent and a copy was sent to the cited author.]

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I am considering the purchase of my first bent. I have tried the strada and the giro. I really
    > thought the giro was fun and the strada was initially more difficult to ride. That said I am
    > convinced I could get comfortable on the Strada with some practice.
    >
    > My question is how does the Speed Machine compare with the Bacchetta bikes?
    >
    > I know the Speed Machine is heavier by almost ten pounds. Unfortunately, I have not had the
    > opportunity to ride it.

    I think you would be happy with any of these bikes. I would not purchase a SpeedMachine unless I
    could ride it first and it suited me.

    If the Bacchetta suited you and you can'e easily get a SpeedMachine to try, then don't hesitate to
    go for the Bacchetta. If the Strada fits, you might want to opt for it over the Giro.

    --
    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  3. Hi Cletus,

    You (Cletus D. Lee) wrote:
    > I would not purchase a SpeedMachine unless I could ride it first and it suited me.
    >
    First ride won't help unless you are already used to bents. Took me 200 km to get used to it, but
    now it's fantastic. Have a look on it at my homepage.

    Regards, Helmuth

    --
    Home page: http://www.schutzeich.de/index.htm Virtual Access 5.51 build 315, Windows 2000 build 2600
    Edited: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 10:06 +0100 CET Replies in NG only please.
     
  4. Geoff Adams

    Geoff Adams Guest

    I agree with Helmuth on the point about the Speedmachine. It is not a bike that gives a satisfying
    first ride - many miles are necessary to developing a riding style. Having said that it is my first
    bent and I have only put about 300
    mi. on it so far. The first 50 miles were tricky and filled with buyer's remorse (although I bought
    it used for a very low price). Now I feel it was a great choice as an all around fast touring
    bike for the kind of riding I do. It's low, though, so city streets around Boston would present
    visibility problems. The Strada/Corsa is high and fast and would be a better choice for the city
    in my opinion.

    I see that you are in Brookline. If you would like to try a Speedmachine please come ride mine in
    Providence! (after the snow melts, preferably). Hopefully you also already know that Belmont
    Wheelworks carries Bachetta and Vision recumbents. If you go there, talk to Scott Chamberlain - he
    is the 'bent expert.

    Email me privately if you are interested in a Speedmachine test ride.

    -Geoff Adams ([email protected]) Providence

    Bill wrote:
    > I am considering the purchase of my first bent. I have tried the strada and the giro. I really
    > thought the giro was fun and the strada was initially more difficult to ride. That said I am
    > convinced I could get comfortable on the Strada with some practice.
    >
    > My question is how does the Speed Machine compare with the Bacchetta bikes?
    >
    > I know the Speed Machine is heavier by almost ten pounds. Unfortunately, I have not had the
    > opportunity to ride it. But it looks great and the suspension is very appealing. My other concern
    > is how it would handle hills given the extra weight?
    >
    > I would appreciate any opinions, especially from those with experience riding the speed machine
    > and the Bacchetta bikes. I should also mention that I live in Brookline, MA which is adjacent to
    > Boston and some of my riding will be on city streets.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > Bill
     
  5. Stratrider

    Stratrider Guest

    Bill, I agree with Cletus. RIDE a speed machine before making a decision to buy. I love the
    looks of the speed machine! Some time ago I finally had a chance to ride one. I hated it! I felt
    very constrained in the cockpit. You may find it's just what you're looking for. A ride will
    tell you that.

    Jim Reilly Reading, PA
     
  6. Of the Speedmachine, Geoff Adams wrote:

    > It's low, though, so city streets around Boston would present visibility problems.

    All in the mind... I used mine daily in central London - yes, it's back on the road for the first
    time since December 20th, and my back is very chuffed with that state of affairs, I can tell you...

    Jim Reilly added:

    > I hated it! I felt very constrained in the cockpit.

    With the tiller steering it *is* a bit of a tight fit, but the alternative "arms-out" style bars
    take care of that problem.

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  7. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    Low bents are different. Several list contributors reported unhappy first experiences. Barry Sanders
    comes to mind. The lower sitting position centralizes mass around the center of gravity, resulting
    in a very responsive bike. If you are not used to it, that feels twitchy as hell!!

    Plus, your feet are in front of you when stopped, not under you. Standing up is a bit tricky.
    That's where I fall the most. I would still have reservations about commuting in heavy traffic
    on a low bike such as a SpeedMachine.

    --
    Miles of Smiles,

    Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone

    www.gate.net/~teblum
     
  8. Bill,

    One other thing to consider may be functionality. The Speed Machine will still accept a big tail box
    (possibly boosting speed potential as well as utility) and you can get a rear rack that can carry a
    bunch of stuff. I'm not sure if the Bacchetta bikes (beautiful as they are) will even accept a rack
    (I tried to check out the "Accessories" section of their site, but it was "under construction" at
    that moment).

    I've found that utility is something often overlooked. It was a wonderful surprise that my P-38
    Lightning was a fast bike, but would also accept fenders (important in the Pacific Northwest), a
    standard rack AND a Burley trailer. So it could be a fast club bike or a utilitarian mule, and it
    became the only bike I ever needed, which helped to kinda justify the price).

    Of course, if the main objective is speed, all that functionality stuff goes right out the window!

    Good luck! Andrew

    "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am considering the purchase of my first bent. I have tried the strada and the giro. I really
    > thought the giro was fun and the strada was initially more difficult to ride. That said I am
    > convinced I could get comfortable on the Strada with some practice.
    >
    > My question is how does the Speed Machine compare with the Bacchetta bikes?
    >
    > I know the Speed Machine is heavier by almost ten pounds. Unfortunately, I have not had the
    > opportunity to ride it. But it looks great and the suspension is very appealing. My other concern
    > is how it would handle hills given the extra weight?
    >
    > I would appreciate any opinions, especially from those with experience riding the speed machine
    > and the Bacchetta bikes. I should also mention that I live in Brookline, MA which is adjacent to
    > Boston and some of my riding will be on city streets.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > Bill
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:
    > ... With the tiller steering it *is* a bit of a tight fit, but the alternative "arms-out" style
    > bars take care of that problem.

    ... but ruin the looks of the Speedmachine.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side) Various HPV's
     
  10. Geoff Adams

    Geoff Adams Guest

    Speaking of Speedmachine handlebars...

    I find the tiller steering bars to be wide. Too wide. Anybody know of a good source of custom made
    handlebars? Or possibly someone can suggest a specific replacement bar that would get this praying
    hamster's hands a bit closer together.

    --
    -Geoff

    Tom Sherman wrote:
    > Dave Larrington wrote:
    >
    >>... With the tiller steering it *is* a bit of a tight fit, but the alternative "arms-out" style
    >>bars take care of that problem.
    >
    >
    > ... but ruin the looks of the Speedmachine.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side) Various HPV's
     
  11. Bill

    Bill Guest

    I really appreciate everyone's thoughts. Does anyone have any thoughts about climbing hills with the
    Speed Machine vs. the Giro or Strada?

    "Andrew Heckman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Bill,
    >
    > One other thing to consider may be functionality. The Speed Machine will still accept a big tail
    > box (possibly boosting speed potential as well as utility) and you can get a rear rack that can
    > carry a bunch of stuff. I'm not sure if the Bacchetta bikes (beautiful as they are) will even
    > accept a rack (I tried to check out the "Accessories" section of their site, but it was "under
    > construction" at that moment).
    >
    > I've found that utility is something often overlooked. It was a wonderful surprise that my P-38
    > Lightning was a fast bike, but would also accept fenders (important in the Pacific Northwest), a
    > standard rack AND a Burley trailer. So it could be a fast club bike or a utilitarian mule, and it
    > became the only bike I ever needed, which helped to kinda justify the price).
    >
    > Of course, if the main objective is speed, all that functionality stuff goes right out the window!
    >
    > Good luck! Andrew
    >
    > "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]osting.google.com...
    > > I am considering the purchase of my first bent. I have tried the strada and the giro. I really
    > > thought the giro was fun and the strada was initially more difficult to ride. That said I am
    > > convinced I could get comfortable on the Strada with some practice.
    > >
    > > My question is how does the Speed Machine compare with the Bacchetta bikes?
    > >
    > > I know the Speed Machine is heavier by almost ten pounds. Unfortunately, I have not had the
    > > opportunity to ride it. But it looks great and the suspension is very appealing. My other
    > > concern is how it would handle hills given the extra weight?
    > >
    > > I would appreciate any opinions, especially from those with experience riding the speed machine
    > > and the Bacchetta bikes. I should also mention that I live in Brookline, MA which is adjacent to
    > > Boston and some of my riding will be on city streets.
    > >
    > > Thanks in advance.
    > >
    > > Bill
     
  12. Geoff

    I just took a pipe cutter and cut off 2-3 inches off the end of the handlebars and now my arms are
    in fairly tight.

    Dan

    geoff adams wrote:

    > Speaking of Speedmachine handlebars...
    >
    > I find the tiller steering bars to be wide. Too wide. Anybody know of a good source of custom made
    > handlebars? Or possibly someone can suggest a specific replacement bar that would get this praying
    > hamster's hands a bit closer together.
    >
    >

    --

    Daniel T. W. Lum, M.D. Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. USA [email protected]
     
  13. Hi Bill,

    You (Bill) wrote:
    > Does anyone have any thoughts about climbing hills with the Speed Machine
    >
    On a bent you'll need other muscles than on an upright, so you first will have to train them. Also,
    you'll have to take to a higher pedalling frequency (80 rpm ore more). Once this has been achieved,
    climbing is no problem.

    Regards, Helmuth

    --
    Home page: http://www.schutzeich.de/index.htm Virtual Access 5.51 build 315, Windows 2000 build 2600
    Edited: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 08:50 +0100 CET Replies in NG only please.
     
  14. Me:

    > With the tiller steering it *is* a bit of a tight fit, but the alternative "arms-out" style bars
    > take care of that problem.

    Tom Sherman:

    > ... but ruin the looks of the Speedmachine.

    "I agree" - William The Concurrer

    Geoff Adams:

    > I find the tiller steering bars to be wide. Too wide. > Anybody know of a
    good source of custom made
    > handlebars? Or possibly someone can suggest a specific replacement bar that would get this praying
    > hamster's hands a bit closer together.

    I've fitted a pair of MTB bar-ends inboard of the brake and gear controls - see
    http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/misc/Speedmachine.htm

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  15. Geoff Adams

    Geoff Adams Guest

    Daniel T. W. Lum, M.D. wrote:
    > Geoff
    >
    > I just took a pipe cutter and cut off 2-3 inches off the end of the handlebars and now my arms are
    > in fairly tight.
    >
    > Dan

    I don't know ..... just the thought of a pipe cutter coming anywhere near that machine scares me
    a bit. But I will think about that. It seems like this mod would put the brake levers right at
    the curve no?

    -Geoff

    >
    > geoff adams wrote:
    >
    >> Speaking of Speedmachine handlebars...
    >>
    >> I find the tiller steering bars to be wide. Too wide. Anybody know of a good source of custom
    >> made handlebars? Or possibly someone can suggest a specific replacement bar that would get this
    >> praying hamster's hands a bit closer together.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >

    --
    -Geoff

    http://www.geoffadams.com
     
  16. Geoff Adams

    Geoff Adams Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:

    > I've fitted a pair of MTB bar-ends inboard of the brake and gear controls - see
    > http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/misc/Speedmachine.htm

    Excellent solution - best of both worlds. They look good too ... they're elk bars, really, or maybe
    reindeer bars? Antler-like.

    --
    -Geoff
     
  17. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Bill,
    >
    > One other thing to consider may be functionality. The Speed Machine will still accept a big tail
    > box (possibly boosting speed potential as well as utility) and you can get a rear rack that can
    > carry a bunch of stuff. I'm not sure if the Bacchetta bikes (beautiful as they are) will even
    > accept a rack (I tried to check out the "Accessories" section of their site, but it was "under
    > construction" at that moment).

    The Bacchetta seat (Not the M-5) is equipped with 4 tabs to accomodate a MidShip underseat rack. I
    have fenders (No less important in the Gulf Coast where annual rain fall matches that of the Pacific
    NW) , rear rack (RANS HT) and MidShip rack on my Bacchetta Giro.I would not have purchased the Giro
    unless it were capable of managing these necessities(?).

    > I've found that utility is something often overlooked. It was a wonderful surprise that my P-38
    > Lightning was a fast bike, but would also accept fenders (important in the Pacific Northwest), a
    > standard rack AND a Burley trailer. So it could be a fast club bike or a utilitarian mule, and it
    > became the only bike I ever needed, which helped to kinda justify the price).

    My Lightning is equipped similarly to my Giro. There is not much difference in the speed of either
    bike. I have never figured out how to put a Midship rack on the Lightning. With two racks and a seat
    bag, I have never seen the benefit of towing a trailer.

    > Of course, if the main objective is speed, all that functionality stuff goes right out the window!

    Maybe not. Last summer I participated in a century. It was with great relish that I passed pacelines
    with my fender/rack and kickstand equipped Lightning. I also carried 7L of water (~15lb.) I averaged
    over 21 mph for the first 50 miles and finished with
    17.5 mph average. I probably would have made a better finish except for the flat at 85 miles.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  18. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Hi Bill,
    >
    > You (Bill) wrote:
    > > Does anyone have any thoughts about climbing hills with the Speed Machine
    > >
    > On a bent you'll need other muscles than on an upright, so you first will have to train them.
    > Also, you'll have to take to a higher pedalling frequency (80 rpm ore more). Once this has been
    > achieved, climbing is no problem.

    With the right gearing and engine, all of these bikes will climb anything you can put in front of
    it. It should not be a concern with any of the bikes that you mention.
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  19. Hi Cletus,

    You (Cletus Lee) wrote:
    > With the right gearing and engine, all of these bikes will climb anything you can put in
    > front of it.
    >
    This is slightly overstated. ;-)

    While I have done with my upright + luggage an 18% slope at 3-4 km/h, I am still not able to drive
    below 6 km/h with my SpeedMachine (with the Rohloff 14 gear and 42/17 cogs). This limits my climbing
    ability somewhat according to my lung capacity. ;-)

    Regards, Helmuth

    --
    Home page: http://www.schutzeich.de/index.htm Virtual Access 5.51 build 315, Windows 2000 build 2600
    Edited: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 15:20 +0100 CET Replies in NG only please.
     
  20. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Hi Cletus,
    >
    > You (Cletus Lee) wrote:
    > > With the right gearing and engine, all of these bikes will climb anything you can put in front
    > > of it.
    > >
    > This is slightly overstated. ;-)
    >
    > While I have done with my upright + luggage an 18% slope at 3-4 km/h, I am still not able to drive
    > below 6 km/h with my SpeedMachine (with the Rohloff 14 gear and 42/17 cogs). This limits my
    > climbing ability somewhat according to my lung capacity. ;-)

    I don not know what this translates to in what we on this side of the pond call 'gear- inches', but
    I do know that I watched a V-Rex with a Rohloff climb a 5 mile Category 1 climb at the end of last
    years Mountains of Misery Century This climb is 12-15% grade in places. I think the V-Rex had a 38T
    Chainring.

    Like I said. "With the right gearing and engine..." Must be the engine ;-)

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
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