Speed on Hybrid vs Road Bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by enamore22, Jun 20, 2004.

  1. enamore22

    enamore22 New Member

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    I'm currently averaging around 15 mph on some really hilly rides (30 - 40 miles) around my area. I'm on an inexpensive Hybrid with mountain bike tires.

    How much of an improvement could I possibly expect by switching to a nice road bike? 2 - 3 mph?

    Thanks!
    -Chris
     
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  2. Liquid.Fire

    Liquid.Fire New Member

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    ive neva rode a hybird in my life... BUT i do ride a racing bike nearly ever day of my life.. and it tops everything, u can really get so fast speeds, as long as ur engine (legs) can do it, the change in seating position EG leaning forward increases airodynamics, smaller tyres for less friction, lighter frame, better gear ratio. i shld expect it would make a minium of 5mph difference, plus u look sexier ;) lol
    Liquid
     
  3. keydates

    keydates New Member

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    What's it like riding up hills on a road bike? On the brief time that I had one, I seemed slower on the road bike than on my mountain bike. Could that just be because of that difference in position (which I wasn't used to)?

    Once I get my new road bike, will I be faster uphill than I was on my mountain bike (assuming all other factors are equal)?

    Edit: I think that you could probably gain at least 2-3 mph on a good road bike.
     
  4. sparknote_s

    sparknote_s New Member

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    What about coming from a hybrid with smooth tires? Not road tires, but smaller and smoother than mountain tires. Like an in-between. Going to a road bike still a big difference you think? Oh and what about adding clipless pedals and aerobars?
     
  5. keydates

    keydates New Member

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    I'd say you'd see a difference, although how big I don't know. Clipless pedals will make you more efficient in pedalling, tires will provide a little less resistance on the road, and aerobars will give you a better position.

    After you get used to the change of position, I'd guess you'd get at least a gain of a couple mph.
     
  6. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    I'd say a 2 mph difference is possible. More than that, a good road bike will feel a lot smoother and quieter, as well as more responsive for climbing and accelerating.

    Suggest you try some test rides at your LBS. If you can't afford a road bike now, you could get a lot of the speed improvement just by changing wheels and tires.
     
  7. Liquid.Fire

    Liquid.Fire New Member

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    im a hill climber, and there isnt much difference when climbing a hill on a racer, (between mountain bike and racer ) but there is a small difference. you'll notice on the other side of the hill that you can go over 30mph easy though!
     
  8. keydates

    keydates New Member

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    What if you can reach 30 mph downhill on a mtb? Is it conceivable to reach 40 on a road bike :) ?
     
  9. Liquid.Fire

    Liquid.Fire New Member

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    yeh i hit 39.2 mph the other week
     
  10. enamore22

    enamore22 New Member

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    Well, I can get 39mph on my Hybrid fairly easily. So probably!
     
  11. Liquid.Fire

    Liquid.Fire New Member

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    i just think Hybirds look a bit gay really
     
  12. wyllisx2

    wyllisx2 New Member

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    I just got a road bike after riding a mtb with slicks on it. There are a lot of factors that make my ride faster on the RB vs the MTB.

    The tires on my new bike are much thinner creating a great deal less resistence.

    The more forward position does reduce wind drag.

    Better gearing is a huge factor too.

    I'd love to tell you what the real difference has been but my new comp hasn't gotten to me yet. As just an estimate I'd guess a gain of 3-4 mph. This is on the regular course I ride here in CT nearly everyday.
     
  13. wyllisx2

    wyllisx2 New Member

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    Well I got the comp attached it & went for a test ride. I kept to the same 10 mile course & averaged 2.5 mph faster & finished the distance in 13 fewer minutes. I thought it would be a larger difference & the very windy conditions may have been a factor.

    While riding at the same average cadence of 60 my cruising speed is 18-19 mph. It used to be 15-16.

    I can't wait for a nonwindy day to really try it out.:p
     
  14. Postie

    Postie New Member

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    With all factors being equal you should see about a 10% difference in speed on a road bike vs. a hybrid. However many rides are not about all factors being equal.

    Hybrid's are designed to put you in a much more upright position then a road bike. This means that the road bike will have a considerable advantage against the wind. The weight difference between a hybrid and a road bike should also be a conservative 5 pounds. This means that the road bike should also have the advantage while climbing.

    I know the question was regarding speed, however it is worth mentioning that speed is only one out of several factors you'd compare between the two bikes. On a nice piece of hi-way the road bike will be much, much smoother of a ride while the hybrid is created more as a general-purpose bike with a "comfortable" riding position.
     
  15. Red2000SS

    Red2000SS New Member

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    LOL!

    I agree the Hybrids may be sort of dorky looking, BUT...

    This just seems like this is a sport where you have little room to be deriding others as looking gay!

    Let's set the scene... A group of serious road racing guys riding $2000 - $3000+ bicycles have stopped. They see someone out riding a hybrid just getting some excersise who maybe can't afford a $2000 bike.

    Rider1: Can you believe how gay that dork on the hybrid looks!

    Rider2: Yes, Extremely Gay... I wouldn't be caught dead on such a gay looking bike... I am glad we are really cool...

    All the while, standing around in what amounts to spandex underwear you wouldn't be caught dead in any activity other than riding, and gay looking plastic shoes that you can't even really walk in, exchanging tips on how to best shave their legs!!! :rolleyes:

    Yes, that sounds extremely heterosexual.... LOL :D

    On top of all that, many terms in cycling are French (and anything French is essentially gay) Criterium, peleton, etc.

    And doesn't the guy that is the best sprinter or climber ( I forget) in the Tour de France (yet another French [GAY] phrase) win the PINK POLKA DOT jersey... Many NFL, hockey, rugby etc. teams use pink polka dot jerseys - Oh wait, my mistake - that would be considered EXTREMELY GAY!!! LOL :D

    This is intended as a humorous response - no offense if you are French or gay...

    I just feel like anyone that is seriously involved in cycling has little room to deride others as looking gay without seeming like the pot calling the kettle black.

    Flame me if you must, I was just struck by the irony of it all...
     
  16. Marx SS

    Marx SS New Member

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    u rok red.
     
  17. zperrys

    zperrys New Member

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    A road bike with a double front chainring combo will slow you down for a while (because of the reduced mechanical advantage), but your legs will get stronger, and you'll ultimately be able to ride faster.
     
  18. dennis dee

    dennis dee New Member

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    All else being equal I think a closed-coach hybrid will out pace a roadbike on a straight and level road. The one biggest limiting factor against road bikes is the front width. That is why UCI limits frame spars ratios to 4:1 (side to front width ratio). The reason for this is that there is a measurable aerodynamic advantage of a narrower front width versus the narrowest UCI allowable handlebar or aerobar width. But having said this, I doubt if a hybrid will be as fast on a hill simply because there is no aero advantage going up a hill when one can't go beyond, say, 15-20 mph and sustain it.
     
  19. belfast-biker

    belfast-biker New Member

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    Are you saying the width of a roadbike is more than a hybrid? What is a closed-coach hybrid, and why will it go faster than a roadbike?
     
  20. dennis dee

    dennis dee New Member

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    The width of a hybrid is probably no wider than a typical roadie. But in terms of frontal area, an open hybrid is probably less because of its height. The biggest aerodynamic defeciency of a roadie is the rider's frontal area, particulary the torso and the extended arms - it's just like a sail. Reducing this to, say, a superman position (note: former hour record holder Greame Obree) greatly diminishes the frontal area. That is also the reason why the UCI has banned this position on time trials and alike and has reached a consensus on the use of tri-bars and the resulting position.

    Reducing frame spar to less than 4:1 (ratio of the bike's length to its frontal length) means one will punch a smaller hole against the wind, and consequently be more aerodynamically effecient.

    A closed-coach hybrid is a hybrid with fairings. The advantages of such is obvious.
     
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