Spinach shouldn't be eaten raw?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by MrKrinkle, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. MrKrinkle

    MrKrinkle Guest

    Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent it's
    nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only that, but it
    also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad you ate it with.
    But if you cook it first then you get the nutrients. Is that true?
     
    Tags:


  2. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    MrKrinkle wrote:
    > Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent it's
    > nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only that, but it
    > also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad you ate it with.
    > But if you cook it first then you get the nutrients. Is that true?
    >



    No. But there probably is a bit of truth to it. I believe spinach
    contains oxalates, which inhibit (not not totally prevent) the
    absorption of calcium and... iron? OTOH, cooking will destroy some (but
    not all) of the vitamins.

    Overall, I think it would be more nutritious raw -- it certainly makes a
    better salad raw!

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  3. "MrKrinkle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent it's
    > nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only that, but it
    > also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad you ate it with.
    > But if you cook it first then you get the nutrients. Is that true?
    >


    Never heard of that. If you are taking Warfarin you should limit the amount
    of spinach (and all greens to some extent) because of the reaction with
    vitamin K
     
  4. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote

    > MrKrinkle wrote:
    >> Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent it's
    >> nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only that, but it
    >> also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad you ate it with.
    >> But if you cook it first then you get the nutrients. Is that true?


    > No. But there probably is a bit of truth to it. I believe spinach
    > contains oxalates, which inhibit (not not totally prevent) the absorption
    > of calcium and... iron? OTOH, cooking will destroy some (but not all) of
    > the vitamins.
    >
    > Overall, I think it would be more nutritious raw -- it certainly makes a
    > better salad raw!


    I did a quick little search and right away found two sites that backed up
    what he said, that it's better to be eaten cooked. I don't know about
    it's affect on other foods.

    nancy
     
  5. >that prevent it's

    >about it's affect on other foods.


    Two people in this thread who don't know the difference between "it's"
    and "its".
     
  6. sf

    sf Guest

    On 2 Oct 2005 21:20:35 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    > >that prevent it's

    >
    > >about it's affect on other foods.

    >
    > Two people in this thread who don't know the difference between "it's"
    > and "its".


    Was that the most constructive comment you could make?
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    "MrKrinkle" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent it's
    > nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only that, but it
    > also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad you ate it with.
    > But if you cook it first then you get the nutrients. Is that true?
    >


    I think you should eat it any way you like it depending on what you are
    cooking!

    Spinach raw makes fantastic salads and is great as a lettuce substitute
    in sandwiches.

    It's also great cooked by itself, and in quiches, cassaroles and
    frittatas.

    Cheers!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2 Oct 2005 21:20:35 -0700, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > >that prevent it's

    > >
    > > >about it's affect on other foods.

    > >
    > > Two people in this thread who don't know the difference between "it's"
    > > and "its".

    >
    > Was that the most constructive comment you could make?


    Indeed... ;-p
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  9. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >that prevent it's

    >
    >>about it's affect on other foods.

    >
    > Two people in this thread who don't know the difference between "it's"
    > and "its".


    (laugh) Well, I don't think your sentence is complete, and I am pretty
    sure you are supposed to put the . inside the quotes.

    Could be wrong.

    nancy
     
  10. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> MrKrinkle wrote:
    >>> Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent
    >>> it's nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only
    >>> that, but it also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad
    >>> you ate it with. But if you cook it first then you get the
    >>> nutrients. Is that true?

    >
    >> No. But there probably is a bit of truth to it. I believe spinach
    >> contains oxalates, which inhibit (not not totally prevent) the
    >> absorption of calcium and... iron? OTOH, cooking will destroy some
    >> (but not all) of the vitamins.
    >>
    >> Overall, I think it would be more nutritious raw -- it certainly
    >> makes a better salad raw!

    >
    > I did a quick little search and right away found two sites that
    > backed up what he said, that it's better to be eaten cooked. I don't
    > know about it's affect on other foods.
    >
    > nancy


    Then I feel mighty fine about the cream of spinach soup I made the other day
    :) Was going to be broccoli but the spinach in the freezer caught my eye.

    Jill
     
  11. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >> "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>> MrKrinkle wrote:
    >>>> Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent
    >>>> it's nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only
    >>>> that, but it also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad
    >>>> you ate it with. But if you cook it first then you get the
    >>>> nutrients. Is that true?

    >>
    >>> No. But there probably is a bit of truth to it. I believe spinach
    >>> contains oxalates, which inhibit (not not totally prevent) the
    >>> absorption of calcium and... iron? OTOH, cooking will destroy some
    >>> (but not all) of the vitamins.
    >>>
    >>> Overall, I think it would be more nutritious raw -- it certainly
    >>> makes a better salad raw!

    >>
    >> I did a quick little search and right away found two sites that
    >> backed up what he said, that it's better to be eaten cooked. I don't
    >> know about it's affect on other foods.
    >>
    >> nancy

    >
    > Then I feel mighty fine about the cream of spinach soup I made the other
    > day
    > :) Was going to be broccoli but the spinach in the freezer caught my eye.
    >
    > Jill
    >

    I cannot eat spinach raw except for a couple of leaves. When I eat spinach
    steamed or blanched, I always pour over it a tablespoon of vinegar because
    I've heard that spinach will keep bind calcium and not let it be absorbed.
    That could be a hoax, I'm not stating it as fact, just simply my reason for
    using vinegar.

    I made this simple spinach dish last night, Quick and EASY! It was good.
    Creamed Spinach.

    Pour a batch of spinach into a hot pan (no water needed if you washed your
    spinach). Cook as long as you desire. Take it out and chop it.
    Add some butter (melt first) and cream to your pan and heat to point of
    boiling. Add back into your pan the spinach. Sprinkle on a little fresh
    nutmeg.
    Dee Dee
     
  12. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> >that prevent it's

    >>
    >>>about it's affect on other foods.

    >>
    >> Two people in this thread who don't know the difference between "it's"
    >> and "its".

    >
    > (laugh) Well, I don't think your sentence is complete, and I am pretty
    > sure you are supposed to put the . inside the quotes.
    >
    > Could be wrong.
    >
    > nancy

    LOL, you are right, Nancy. The exception is the question mark.
    So funny.
    Dee Dee
     
  13. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]shentel.net> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Nancy Young wrote:
    >>> "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>>> MrKrinkle wrote:
    >>>>> Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent
    >>>>> it's nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only
    >>>>> that, but it also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad
    >>>>> you ate it with. But if you cook it first then you get the
    >>>>> nutrients. Is that true?
    >>>
    >>>> No. But there probably is a bit of truth to it. I believe spinach
    >>>> contains oxalates, which inhibit (not not totally prevent) the
    >>>> absorption of calcium and... iron? OTOH, cooking will destroy some
    >>>> (but not all) of the vitamins.
    >>>>
    >>>> Overall, I think it would be more nutritious raw -- it certainly
    >>>> makes a better salad raw!
    >>>
    >>> I did a quick little search and right away found two sites that
    >>> backed up what he said, that it's better to be eaten cooked. I don't
    >>> know about it's affect on other foods.
    >>>
    >>> nancy

    >>
    >> Then I feel mighty fine about the cream of spinach soup I made the other
    >> day
    >> :) Was going to be broccoli but the spinach in the freezer caught my
    >> eye.
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>

    > I cannot eat spinach raw except for a couple of leaves. When I eat
    > spinach steamed or blanched, I always pour over it a tablespoon of vinegar
    > because I've heard that spinach will keep bind calcium and not let it be
    > absorbed. That could be a hoax, I'm not stating it as fact, just simply my
    > reason for using vinegar.
    >
    > I made this simple spinach dish last night, Quick and EASY! It was good.
    > Creamed Spinach.
    >
    > Pour a batch of spinach into a hot pan (no water needed if you washed your
    > spinach). Cook as long as you desire. Take it out and chop it.
    > Add some butter (melt first) and cream to your pan and heat to point of
    > boiling. Add back into your pan the spinach. Sprinkle on a little fresh
    > nutmeg.
    > Dee Dee


    I make spinach in a similar way. After having boiled them, you squeeze. Then
    put them in a frying pan with liquefied butter. Salt, nutmeg (if you want)
    and a lot of grated Reggiano cheese. Mix for a minute till Cheese will
    become stringy.
    Gnam Gnam!!! and Yum Yum!
    Pandora
    >
    >
     
  14. Dan Wenz

    Dan Wenz Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:


    >
    > No. But there probably is a bit of truth to it. I believe spinach
    > contains oxalates, which inhibit (not not totally prevent) the
    > absorption of calcium and... iron? OTOH, cooking will destroy some (but
    > not all) of the vitamins.
    >


    Beware you kidney stone formers! If yours are calcium oxalate stones, as
    are mine, a few gulps of milk or a tums may tend to counteract the
    oxalate content of spinach (And other greens containing oxalates).
    Theory is that calcium + oxalates forms calcium oxalate in the bowels
    where the "stuff" is excreted, rather in the bladder/kidneys.
     
  15. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Dumbdora wrote:
    >
    > After having boiled them, you squeeze. Then
    > put them in a frying pan with liquefied butter.


    And the nutrients go down, down, down the drain... leave it to a dumb
    dago who has absolutely no business in a kitchen.

    Normal brained cooks saute tender leafy vegetables directly in fat
    (bacon fat is better than butter), no boiling, no squeezing. And if no
    fat is required simply steam, briefly. Only kitchen imbeciles ever
    boil spinach, and then to add insult to injury they toss away the
    water... DUH! There is never a reason to ever boil fresh spinach
    unless it's to remain in a soup... a *real* WOP who's ever made
    minestrone would know that. Dumbdora is a fraudulent dago and
    absolutely a kitchen fraud.

    Sheldon
     
  16. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Dumbdora wrote:
    >>
    >> After having boiled them, you squeeze. Then
    >> put them in a frying pan with liquefied butter.

    >
    > And the nutrients go down, down, down the drain... leave it to a dumb
    > dago who has absolutely no business in a kitchen.
    >
    > Normal brained cooks saute tender leafy vegetables directly in fat
    > (bacon fat is better than butter), no boiling, no squeezing.


    <Snip>

    > Sheldon


    One of our favorites:

    Sauté pan
    Olive oil
    Minced Garlic (sauté briefly)
    Loads of spinach (washed and dried)
    Finish with a splash of Balsamic.

    Alternate
    Sauté pan
    Olive oil
    Minced Garlic (sauté briefly)
    add the Balsamic to reduce.
    Loads of spinach (washed and dried)
    Sauté & toss till lightly wilted.

    Dimitri
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Pandora wrote:
    > >>
    > >> After having boiled them, you squeeze. Then
    > >> put them in a frying pan with liquefied butter.

    > >
    > > And the nutrients go down, down, down the drain...
    > >
    > > Saute tender leafy vegetables directly in fat
    > > (bacon fat is better than butter), no boiling, no squeezing.

    >
    > <Snip>
    >
    > > Sheldon

    >
    > One of our favorites:
    >
    > Sauté pan
    > Olive oil
    > Minced Garlic (sauté briefly)
    > Loads of spinach (washed and dried)
    > Finish with a splash of Balsamic.
    >
    > Alternate
    > Sauté pan
    > Olive oil
    > Minced Garlic (sauté briefly)
    > add the Balsamic to reduce.
    > Loads of spinach (washed and dried)
    > Sauté & toss till lightly wilted.
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    >


    Add a bit of melted cheese...... ;-d

    I never boil spinach.
    I do sometimes steam it and other mixed veggies, but the steaming water
    gets frozen for later use in soup stocks as it's always loaded with
    veggie flavor. At least steaming does not use much water tho' and does
    not come into direct contact with the veggies.

    Sauteed' spinach IMHO is superior, but I use a mix of butter and olive
    oil.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  18. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> Nancy Young wrote:
    >>>> "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>>
    >>>>> MrKrinkle wrote:
    >>>>>> Someone told me that spinach has some chemicals in it that prevent
    >>>>>> it's nutrients from being absorbed into the body, and not only
    >>>>>> that, but it also prvents the nutrients from the rest of the salad
    >>>>>> you ate it with. But if you cook it first then you get the
    >>>>>> nutrients. Is that true?
    >>>>
    >>>>> No. But there probably is a bit of truth to it. I believe spinach
    >>>>> contains oxalates, which inhibit (not not totally prevent) the
    >>>>> absorption of calcium and... iron? OTOH, cooking will destroy some
    >>>>> (but not all) of the vitamins.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Overall, I think it would be more nutritious raw -- it certainly
    >>>>> makes a better salad raw!
    >>>>
    >>>> I did a quick little search and right away found two sites that
    >>>> backed up what he said, that it's better to be eaten cooked. I don't
    >>>> know about it's affect on other foods.
    >>>>
    >>>> nancy
    >>>
    >>> Then I feel mighty fine about the cream of spinach soup I made the other
    >>> day
    >>> :) Was going to be broccoli but the spinach in the freezer caught my
    >>> eye.
    >>>
    >>> Jill
    >>>

    >> I cannot eat spinach raw except for a couple of leaves. When I eat
    >> spinach steamed or blanched, I always pour over it a tablespoon of
    >> vinegar because I've heard that spinach will keep bind calcium and not
    >> let it be absorbed. That could be a hoax, I'm not stating it as fact,
    >> just simply my reason for using vinegar.
    >>
    >> I made this simple spinach dish last night, Quick and EASY! It was good.
    >> Creamed Spinach.
    >>
    >> Pour a batch of spinach into a hot pan (no water needed if you washed
    >> your spinach). Cook as long as you desire. Take it out and chop it.
    >> Add some butter (melt first) and cream to your pan and heat to point of
    >> boiling. Add back into your pan the spinach. Sprinkle on a little fresh
    >> nutmeg.
    >> Dee Dee

    >
    > I make spinach in a similar way. After having boiled them, you squeeze.
    > Then put them in a frying pan with liquefied butter. Salt, nutmeg (if you
    > want) and a lot of grated Reggiano cheese. Mix for a minute till Cheese
    > will become stringy.
    > Gnam Gnam!!! and Yum Yum!
    > Pandora
    >>

    Pandora, I will never forget seeing the spinach when we were in Italy a
    LOOOONG time ago. There was (outside) in a covered/screened in restaurant
    sitting waiting to be cooked on either a grill or fry-pan, many, many
    rounded balls of spinach which had been flattened (I recall a toothpick
    holding them together). I don't know how I got into cooking spinach this
    way: Making similar balls of blanched spinach, flattening them, and frying
    them in olive oil.
    Thanks for the hint, I will make it your way, tonight. I just cut up a slab
    of Parmisan Regg and put it in my new vacuum foodsaver last night. I will
    not waste it any more. I also cut off some of the rinds for soup. I kept
    some PR out, and I have some fresh spinach left and will try it your way for
    dinner tonight to serve with my lasagna. It's only 1:30 am, so I will have
    to wait. Gnam Gnam~~~~~~
    Dee Dee
     
  19. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> > Pandora wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> After having boiled them, you squeeze. Then
    >> >> put them in a frying pan with liquefied butter.
    >> >
    >> > And the nutrients go down, down, down the drain...
    >> >
    >> > Saute tender leafy vegetables directly in fat
    >> > (bacon fat is better than butter), no boiling, no squeezing.

    >>
    >> <Snip>
    >>
    >> > Sheldon

    >>
    >> One of our favorites:
    >>
    >> Sauté pan
    >> Olive oil
    >> Minced Garlic (sauté briefly)
    >> Loads of spinach (washed and dried)
    >> Finish with a splash of Balsamic.
    >>
    >> Alternate
    >> Sauté pan
    >> Olive oil
    >> Minced Garlic (sauté briefly)
    >> add the Balsamic to reduce.
    >> Loads of spinach (washed and dried)
    >> Sauté & toss till lightly wilted.
    >>
    >> Dimitri
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Add a bit of melted cheese...... ;-d
    >
    > I never boil spinach.
    > I do sometimes steam it and other mixed veggies, but the steaming water
    > gets frozen for later use in soup stocks as it's always loaded with
    > veggie flavor. At least steaming does not use much water tho' and does
    > not come into direct contact with the veggies.
    >
    > Sauteed' spinach IMHO is superior, but I use a mix of butter and olive
    > oil.
    > --
    > Om.


    I never boil spinach, but I do 'blanch' it. But I would not save the water
    for stock -- it turns carrots brown.
    Red & green = brown.
    Dee Dee
     
  20. Dee Randall wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>>that prevent it's
    >>>
    >>>>about it's affect on other foods.
    >>>
    >>>Two people in this thread who don't know the difference between "it's"
    >>>and "its".

    >>
    >>(laugh) Well, I don't think your sentence is complete, and I am pretty
    >>sure you are supposed to put the . inside the quotes.
    >>
    >>Could be wrong.
    >>
    >>nancy

    >
    > LOL, you are right, Nancy. The exception is the question mark.
    > So funny.
    > Dee Dee
    >
    >


    American English puts the period inside the quotes; British English puts
    the period outside the quotes. Haven't you read _Eats, Shoots, and Leaves_?

    --Charlene


    --
    Negotiating: The art of persuading your opponent to take the nice shiny
    copper penny and give you the wrinkled old paper money. -- Bayan, Rick;
    The Cynic's Dictionary, 2002


    email perronnelle at earthlink . net
     
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