Spinergy Rev-X



IzzyG

New Member
Jan 14, 2006
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Hi guys. I've heard very varied responses regarding this wheelset but would like to know the opinions here. What are your opinions regarding this particular wheelset. And what are the general weaknesses and pro's of 4 spoked wheels.
 

park

New Member
Jun 16, 2004
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Spinergy will not stand behind their wheels. As far as they are concerned if there is a problem, you caused it.
 

lumpy

New Member
Oct 22, 2003
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And if your wheel explodes on a fast descent, they won't even send you a card in the hospital!

Do a search here and see other's opinions.
 

JohnO

New Member
Jul 5, 2003
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You only have one butt. Why risk it on a dubious product that has failed in the past?

There are plenty of lightweight wheels out there that have an excellent reputation for holding together on fast downhills. Instead of risking your neck with the Rev-X, scratch up a few hundred more and get a used set of Zipp 404's. I love mine.
 

kleng

New Member
Jan 17, 2006
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Hi

Rode a set of rev x's in the past, early version, wheels felt heavy to get up to speed and difficult to handle in windy conditions, always felt the bike veering away. Pobably better under still conditions like a velodrome or on a flat tt course where your constantly at speed.

QUOTE=JohnO]You only have one butt. Why risk it on a dubious product that has failed in the past?

There are plenty of lightweight wheels out there that have an excellent reputation for holding together on fast downhills. Instead of risking your neck with the Rev-X, scratch up a few hundred more and get a used set of Zipp 404's. I love mine.[/QUOTE]
 

James Dalton

New Member
Jul 22, 2003
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I have a pair of Rev X's and have used them for TT's over the past few years and have found them to be quite OK.

I have heard all the horror stories about them too and as such have been extra careful to check them regularly.

You can get them very cheaply second hand becuase of their bad image and so it's really up to you.

I find mine to be fine and they feel great once you get up above 35km/hr. Mine roll fine and I have never had a problem.
 

cydewaze

New Member
Jun 17, 2004
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I have a pair of Rev-X's as well. They aren't good for my style of riding, so I plan to take advantage of Spinergy's trade-in program. You provide photographic evidence of the destruction of the wheels, and Spinergy will sell you a current wheelset at something like 40% off retail.

That worked out to something like $325-$350 for a set of Xaero Lites (perfect for the wife's bike).
 

Bayouboy2022

New Member
Feb 1, 2006
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I've had my REV-X on a LOOK K56 frameset for a few years and had no problems. I like the feel (Vibration Reduction) of this wheelset on my carbon frame. I have tendonitis from years of riding and it takes a little pain away while riding. I train on my recumbent to relieve elbow stress, but can't give up my Road Bike.
Anyone know (Figures) how many wheels are out there and what percentage have failed? Now you have me worried!




IzzyG said:
Hi guys. I've heard very varied responses regarding this wheelset but would like to know the opinions here. What are your opinions regarding this particular wheelset. And what are the general weaknesses and pro's of 4 spoked wheels.
 

bcardamone

New Member
Jul 23, 2004
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I bought a pair of used Rev-X-s about three years ago and have had no problems whatsoever with them. I will say though that I have no experience at all with them on hills. I live near Ocean City, Maryland and the terrain here is very flat. Mine are mounted on a Trek Aluminum frame.

As far as wind, it actually gets very windy here, 15-25 mph steady winds a lot of the time. I have found very little difference in the performance in crosswinds between the Rev-X and a wire spoke wheel.

Like you, I have also read some bad things about the Rev-X and structural failure, but again, I have found them to be reliable with more than 5000 miles on them since I purchased them. Hope this helps.
 

Bayouboy2022

New Member
Feb 1, 2006
6
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I too have a pair of Rev-X's on my LOOK KG56 Carbon frame. I have crashed a few times with them and had no damage or problems. It's amazing how strong they are being the blades are so thin. Still They do alleviate vibration in the frameset. I also tried them on my TREK 1500. No Complaints.



bcardamone said:
I bought a pair of used Rev-X-s about three years ago and have had no problems whatsoever with them. I will say though that I have no experience at all with them on hills. I live near Ocean City, Maryland and the terrain here is very flat. Mine are mounted on a Trek Aluminum frame.

As far as wind, it actually gets very windy here, 15-25 mph steady winds a lot of the time. I have found very little difference in the performance in crosswinds between the Rev-X and a wire spoke wheel.

Like you, I have also read some bad things about the Rev-X and structural failure, but again, I have found them to be reliable with more than 5000 miles on them since I purchased them. Hope this helps.
 

hd reynolds

New Member
Nov 15, 2005
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From my recollection there are 3 types of rev-X wheels - soft, medium and hard - each denoting to the tension of the spokes (or blades for that matter). These 3 models are distinguished by the graphics/color on the blades, the soft for lighter riders meeting a certain weight criteria so on and so forth.

Before deep section carbon rims became popular in the pro-peloton like the tour de france, Rev-Xs were campaigned by various teams and riders like Mario Cipollini who as you know was a feared sprinter in his heyday. It seems that the horror stories circulating later on about rev-Xs is more urban myth than widespread reality and for that their popularity waned. There were even stories circulated that the blades of Rev-Xs were responsible for severing limbs in accidents. Totally untrue.

About durability I personally know someone who has used them for years and have no major issues with their safety or reliablity except for some carbon surface wear. Otherwise he is quite happy with them altho they have been relegated for use in his beater/training bike.
 

artmichalek

New Member
Sep 15, 2004
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hd reynolds said:
There were even stories circulated that the blades of Rev-Xs were responsible for severing limbs in accidents. Totally untrue.
You probably won't sever the limb, but it's still enough of a concern that the UCI requires a minimum of 12 spokes with a maximum dimension of 10mm for mass start races.
 

hd reynolds

New Member
Nov 15, 2005
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artmichalek said:
You probably won't sever the limb, but it's still enough of a concern that the UCI requires a minimum of 12 spokes with a maximum dimension of 10mm for mass start races.

Doesn’t the UCI allow wheels of this caliber in TTs, much as it allows tri spokes like the HED as campaigned by Discovery and other teams during the TdF?
 

artmichalek

New Member
Sep 15, 2004
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hd reynolds said:
Doesn’t the UCI allow wheels of this caliber in TTs, much as it allows tri spokes like the HED as campaigned by Discovery and other teams during the TdF?
Yes, but only for time trials. Not mass start events.
 

greg687

New Member
Aug 11, 2005
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I have had my set of Rev-Xs since Christmas 99, and many a mile, including commuting with a loaded seatpost rack, racing, crashes, uphill, downhill, whatever. Never a problem. I did once break a bearing cone in the rear hub, and Spinergy sent me a new one free. I also witnessed a guy with the same wheels bump a rear D in the pack with his front wheel... shattered one of the spokes... he continued the race with the broken spoke flapping in the wind.
I love the speed, and found them better on all but the absolute steepest climbs than lightweight wheelsets.
FUnny how a few people have a failure, crash related or not, and it becomes an epidemic. Friend of mine had his Xyrieums fail... cracked rim. It happens.
Thanks
Greg