Spinning?

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Hoya1500, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. Hoya1500

    Hoya1500 New Member

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    So heres a noob question...

    Whats the difference between spinning, using a trainer, and cycling outdoors. Winter's coming, and as much as i hate the idea of being indoors, i have to come to terms with the fact that snow and ice aren't conducive to cycling. So what're my options here, and their pros and cons. I realize that winter (in the midatlantic) is a ways off, but if i have to buy a trainer than its better to know sooner.
     
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  2. SilentShifter

    SilentShifter New Member

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    Spinning - A technique where you pedal at a high cadence (rpm) utilizing a higher (easier) gear. It is said that spinning is easier on your joints and produces less lactic acid than 'mashing' (using a large difficult gear with low rpm). Think Lance Armstron for spinning and Jan Ullrich for mashing

    Trainers - Two types. (1) Trainer - Rear wheel is fixed to the trainer and front wheel rests on the floor or wheel support. Offers complete stability and resistance adjustment. Many different types out there. (2) Rollers (another type of trainer) Here neither wheel is fixed. Both wheels are resting on drums and you have to concentrate heavily on balance and spinning (see above). Allows you to perfect your technique and balance.
     
  3. Eden

    Eden New Member

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    I think "Spinning" as in "Spinning Class" is also a TradeMarked system of indoor cycling classes led by an instructor that use a special kind of stationary bicycle. I've never taken a spinning class, but I've heard it said that they do a good job at cardio, but don't prepare you for real road riding?
     
  4. gogoturtle

    gogoturtle New Member

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    I have been taking spinning classes and using a trainer for about 2 years. I think if you cannot ride during the winter months, both activities can help maintain fitness and improve. The key is not going nuts riding stationary. In comparison to outdoors, neither can replace the road, but both provide a way to get a very structured workout.

    The spinning classes can give you a good workout, but they are usually 45 minutes, not long enough to maintain the level of endurance I want. So, I usually get to the class about 30-34 minutes early to warm up and get a bit longer workout in. The quality of the classes are very dependent on the instructor. Not surprisingly, those instructors with a cycling background are the best IMO. But, I find the spinning bikes do not have a very good road feel. The "brake" type resistance takes some getting used to. That said, I have found the classes (and extra time of the bike) to be a good way to get rides in over the winter and they provide an alternative to spending every night on the trainer.

    IMHO trainers provide a better road feel. I personally favor progressive resistance fluid trainers over mag trainers. I would recommed getting some spinervals DVDs or an Ipod to help get through the workouts. I have also found the use of a power meter provides extra motivation.


    J
     
  5. aa9t8

    aa9t8 New Member

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    just a note for the other side
    i rode last year in the snow and will again this year.
    a cheap mtn bike with nobbies (or studs if you want to get into it) take it easy and have fun. it is nice and quiet and beats the heck out of trainer. just my opinion.
     
  6. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    I ride in the winter with studs it's fun but you have to pick days with less than 2 inches of snow fall because even with studs 2 inches of snow is like 2 inches of sand not good with a cement truck coming up behind you. You can't push it as fast either or you freeze and cause lung burn so it is not as good for training. Spinning with an instuctor to keep you from nodding off sounds like a good idea for fitness but is probably expensive. I use a recumbent magnetic stationary bike and watch a movie like American Flyers. It's ifit compatible so I can use my laptop to run interval programs for me that control the resistance and pace your cadence.

     
  7. huhenio

    huhenio New Member

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    Hey ... spinning sounds like a good idea if the next best option is sitting on the couch.
     
  8. Hoya1500

    Hoya1500 New Member

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    I guess that i should mention that i'll be running and swimming this winter also in order to keep up my endurance and general fitness. So is there a way to narrow down spinning/trainers to be more cycling specific?
     
  9. Induray

    Induray New Member

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    Very hard to do. There is no rela way to gauge your progress except by feel. Yes you can possibly improve on your zones. For example, you can ride at LT level and measure how long you can sustain it. You can run intervals btwn zone and see how many you can perform (i.e. minimum %80 MHR with 30 sec intervals at LT and return to 80%) You will see improvements in these measures and these will benefit your riding undoubtibly. Here is the caveat, you don't know how much improvement ridingwise you have achived... or not. (This is measured by a)Power output, b) speed and time in a known circuit and c) races won). Sustaining longer LT will translate to longer sprints, but have you become faster on your sprints? No way to tell.
    However, I enjoy teaching it. I have seen significant improvement in my climbing since I can endure longer above-LT intervals. And the VIEW! The VIEW s magnificent!!! If you know what I mean.
    One more thing,your endurance will suffer if you don't mix it with longer rides (base mileage) at 50-70% MHR.
     
  10. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    From what I've read on these forums

    1)Computrainer is as close to road as you can get. $$$$$(electronic load generator)

    2)[size=-1]Trax i-magic is very good $$$$ (fancy magnetic)

    3)fluid trainers (with custom flywheels good)$$$

    4)Wind trainers$$ (good but noisey and less available since fluid got more popular)

    5)Spinners$$ and magnetic$ trainers are about even. Spinners and magnetic trainers are less "road" like because as cadence increases resistance seems to decrease unless you tweak the resistance up at the same time. I don't consider it a big deal some people do and spend alot of money to come close to road riding without having to plan ahead and up resistance with cadence. I don't use a spinner because they are low tech I can't use my laptop to change resistance and pace during the workout at times I am changing cadence and resistance every 40 seconds and would find it hard to do manually at maximum effort early in the morning. I believe spining classes use three resistance levels my interval programs ussually span 7 levels out of 10 possible levels so I like magnetic machines better.


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