Spiral-sliced ham question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Chris and Bob N, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. I feel really stupid for having to ask, but I've never served a spiral-sliced ham before. It will be
    for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have to warm it up, or can I just unwrap it, stick
    it on a platter, slice off some starter slices, and serve?

    Some of our guests can't stay long, so I want to have stuff we can whisk out of the fridge the
    minute we get home (we won't eat right that minute...but I won't have to heat things or do last-
    minute prep etc.). Will the chill come off the ham better if I slice it off the bone beforehand? I
    will have plenty of prep time in the morning before church.

    Besides the ham, I'm planning to make baked beans in a crock pot, a pasta salad, spinach salad,
    chopped fresh pineapple, a veggie pltter, and assorted breads, rolls, cheeses and condiments for the
    ham. Pickles and olives, too. My mother-in-law will bring devilled eggs. Dessert will be a cake from
    a wonderful neighborhood cake baker. (The poor baby...the partiy's in his honor and he won't get to
    eat any of this stuff!)

    Last question....has anyone ever had a spiral-slices hamj from BJ's? How was it.
     
    Tags:


  2. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    "Chris and Bob Neidecker" <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I feel really stupid for having to ask, but I've never served a spiral-sliced ham before. It will
    > be for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have to warm it up, or can I just unwrap it,
    > stick it on a platter, slice off some starter slices, and serve?
    >
    > Some of our guests can't stay long, so I want to have stuff we can whisk out of the fridge the
    > minute we get home (we won't eat right that minute...but I won't have to heat things or do last-
    > minute prep etc.). Will the chill come off the ham better if I slice it off the bone beforehand? I
    > will have plenty of prep time in the morning before church.
    >
    > Besides the ham, I'm planning to make baked beans in a crock pot, a pasta salad, spinach salad,
    > chopped fresh pineapple, a veggie pltter, and assorted breads, rolls, cheeses and condiments for
    > the ham. Pickles and olives, too. My mother-in-law will bring devilled eggs. Dessert will be a
    > cake from a wonderful neighborhood cake baker. (The poor baby...the partiy's in his honor and he
    > won't get to eat any of this stuff!)
    >
    > Last question....has anyone ever had a spiral-slices hamj from BJ's? How was it.

    I don't know about the BJ's spiral sliced. I usually buy my at The Honeybaked Store when I'm in a
    rush and do not want to cook a regular, non cooked ham. The spiral sliced I buy is fully cooked and
    ready to go. I would imagine for sandwiches you could just unwrap it and let them have at
    it. If you have a question about the ham, it may be best to ask BJ's. I would almost bet my
    lily garden the ham is fully cooked and ready to serve. Is there nothing on the package
    stating fully cooked, smoked ham? I'm curious about the bone you mentioned. Is the bone not
    sliced through?

    Sounds like a lot of food. Enjoy the day ;)

    Michael

    --
    "Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of scented
    urine." ~~James Joyce, Irish writer (1882-1941)
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Chris and Bob Neidecker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I feel really stupid for having to ask, but I've never served a spiral-sliced ham before. It will
    > be for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have to warm it up, or can I just unwrap it,
    > stick it on a platter, slice off some starter slices, and serve?
    >
    > Some of our guests can't stay long, so I want to have stuff we can whisk
    out
    > of the fridge the minute we get home (we won't eat right that minute...but
    I
    > won't have to heat things or do last-minute prep etc.). Will the chill
    come
    > off the ham better if I slice it off the bone beforehand? I will have plenty of prep time in the
    > morning before church.
    >
    > Besides the ham, I'm planning to make baked beans in a crock pot, a pasta salad, spinach salad,
    > chopped fresh pineapple, a veggie pltter, and
    assorted
    > breads, rolls, cheeses and condiments for the ham. Pickles and olives,
    too.
    > My mother-in-law will bring devilled eggs. Dessert will be a cake from a wonderful neighborhood
    > cake baker. (The poor baby...the partiy's in his honor and he won't get to eat any of this stuff!)
    >
    > Last question....has anyone ever had a spiral-slices hamj from BJ's? How was it.
    >

    This doesn't answer your question, but it is relevant. In my experience, spiral-sliced hams (and
    boned hams also) are always markedly inferior in falvor to the intact, bone-in counterparts. I guess
    the extra processing takes its toll. Slicing a ham is not a big deal.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  4. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >spiral-sliced ham before. It will be for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have to warm
    >it up, or can I just unwrap it, stick it on a platter, slice off some starter slices, and serve?
    >
    >
    The instructions usually call for heating the ham, covered, in a low oven for about two hours or so,
    depending on the size of the ham. Would you feel comfortable popping it in the oven before you leave
    for the church? This way when you arrived back home, it would be warm and ready to serve.

    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist hopes they are.

    To reply, remove the SPAM BLOCK
     
  5. "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]rr.com> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "Chris and Bob Neidecker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I feel really stupid for having to ask, but I've never served a spiral-sliced ham before. It will
    >> be for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have to warm it up, or can I just unwrap it,
    >> stick it on a platter, slice off some starter slices, and serve?
    >>
    >> Some of our guests can't stay long, so I want to have stuff we can whisk
    > out
    >> of the fridge the minute we get home (we won't eat right that minute...but
    > I
    >> won't have to heat things or do last-minute prep etc.). Will the chill
    > come
    >> off the ham better if I slice it off the bone beforehand? I will have plenty of prep time in the
    >> morning before church.
    >>
    >> Besides the ham, I'm planning to make baked beans in a crock pot, a pasta salad, spinach salad,
    >> chopped fresh pineapple, a veggie pltter, and
    > assorted
    >> breads, rolls, cheeses and condiments for the ham. Pickles and olives,
    > too.
    >> My mother-in-law will bring devilled eggs. Dessert will be a cake from a wonderful neighborhood
    >> cake baker. (The poor baby...the partiy's in his honor and he won't get to eat any of this
    >> stuff!)
    >>
    >> Last question....has anyone ever had a spiral-slices hamj from BJ's? How was it.
    >>
    >
    > This doesn't answer your question, but it is relevant. In my experience, spiral-sliced hams (and
    > boned hams also) are always markedly inferior in falvor to the intact, bone-in counterparts. I
    > guess the extra processing takes its toll. Slicing a ham is not a big deal.

    No, it doesn't answer her question, and I'm sure she wants to hear that the ham she's bought (or at
    least planned specifically to buy) is supposedly inferior to hams that aren't spiral-sliced. Slicing
    a ham may not be a big deal to you, but it may be to the OP who has a myriad of other things to do
    on this occasion.

    To the OP...

    I'm not familiary with BJ's, but I've had many spiral-sliced hams from Honey-Baked Ham over the
    years. While I do like to bake my own cured smoked hams which have to be sliced after baking, I
    really do like the Honey-Baked Hams. They are moist and flavorful and the slices are perfect for
    making sandwiches. They are fully-cooked and ready to serve out of the package, although they can be
    warmed before serving if desired. You would need to check with BJ's for the particulars regarding
    their hams, but they are probably quite similar to Honey-Baked Hams.

    Enjoy the christening and the party!

    Wayne
     
  6. The Joneses

    The Joneses Guest

    Donna Rose wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >spiral-sliced ham before. It will be for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have to
    > >warm it up, or can I just unwrap it, stick it on a platter, slice off some starter slices,
    > >and serve?
    > >
    > The instructions usually call for heating the ham, covered, in a low oven for about two hours or
    > so, depending on the size of the ham. Would you feel comfortable popping it in the oven before you
    > leave for the church? This way when you arrived back home, it would be warm and ready to serve.

    I did that once, the warming part, and all the juices leached out. Next year's was served cold and
    was much better & juicier, IMO. Edrena.
     
  7. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 18:15:35 -0000, Dog3
    <[email protected];not> wrote:

    > Is the bone not sliced through?
    >
    I don't fork over the money for Honey Baked, so I don't know. To my surprise, I can say that I've
    never knowingly eaten it at someone's house - although I do know people who say they buy them.

    Are you saying the bone in a H.B. ham is sliced? I'd be surprised if it was because the bones in
    spiral hams I've encounterd aren't sliced.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  8. sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    4ax.com:

    > On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 18:15:35 -0000, Dog3 <[email protected];not> wrote:
    >
    >> Is the bone not sliced through?
    >>
    > I don't fork over the money for Honey Baked, so I don't know. To my surprise, I can say that I've
    > never knowingly eaten it at someone's house - although I do know people who say they buy them.
    >
    > Are you saying the bone in a H.B. ham is sliced? I'd be surprised if it was because the bones in
    > spiral hams I've encounterd aren't sliced.

    No, the bone in HBH is not sliced. The spiral slicing machine slices the entire ham around the bone.

    Wayne
     
  9. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 00:29:51 GMT, The Joneses
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Donna Rose wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > >spiral-sliced ham before. It will be for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have to
    > > >warm it up, or can I just unwrap it, stick it on a platter, slice off some starter slices, and
    > > >serve?
    > > >
    > > The instructions usually call for heating the ham, covered, in a low oven for about two hours
    > > or so, depending on the size of the ham. Would you feel comfortable popping it in the oven
    > > before you leave for the church? This way when you arrived back home, it would be warm and
    > > ready to serve.
    >
    > I did that once, the warming part, and all the juices leached out. Next year's was served cold
    > and was much better & juicier, IMO. Edrena.
    >

    Just guessing: You probably heated it too long or too high.

    The only dried out ham I've ever made was way too over cooked. There was no other reason for it.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  10. Kent H.

    Kent H. Guest

    How can you cook a precooked ham????

    sf wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 00:29:51 GMT, The Joneses <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Donna Rose wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > > >spiral-sliced ham before. It will be for sandwiches at a post-christening lunch. Do I have
    > > > >to warm it up, or can I just unwrap it, stick it on a platter, slice off some starter
    > > > >slices, and serve?
    > > > >
    > > > The instructions usually call for heating the ham, covered, in a low oven for about two hours
    > > > or so, depending on the size of the ham. Would you feel comfortable popping it in the oven
    > > > before you leave for the church? This way when you arrived back home, it would be warm and
    > > > ready to serve.
    > >
    > > I did that once, the warming part, and all the juices leached out. Next year's was served cold
    > > and was much better & juicier, IMO. Edrena.
    > >
    >
    > Just guessing: You probably heated it too long or too high.
    >
    > The only dried out ham I've ever made was way too over cooked. There was no other reason for it.
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  11. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

  12. "Dog3" <[email protected];not> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >

    > I'm curious about the bone you mentioned. Is the bone not sliced through?
    >

    Actually, I have no idea. I know the meat is spiral sliced, but I'm not sure whether they cut around
    the bone or not. I don't like ham, so that's why I've never served one of these things before. I
    said "cut it off the bone," but I guess what I meant was "cut it apart."

    Guess I need to read "Ham for Dummies" before next weekend.

    > Sounds like a lot of food. Enjoy the day ;)

    Why, thanks! We will.
     
  13. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> deliciously
    posted in news:[email protected]:

    >>
    >> This doesn't answer your question, but it is relevant. In my experience, spiral-sliced hams (and
    >> boned hams also) are always markedly inferior in falvor to the intact, bone-in counterparts. I
    >> guess the extra processing takes its toll. Slicing a ham is not a big deal.
    >
    > No, it doesn't answer her question, and I'm sure she wants to hear that the ham she's bought (or
    > at least planned specifically to buy) is supposedly inferior to hams that aren't spiral-sliced.
    > Slicing a ham may not be a big deal to you, but it may be to the OP who has a myriad of other
    > things to do on this occasion.

    I have bought other hams at the supermarket when I could not or did not want to make the trek to Honey-
    Baked. The butcher at the supermarket would thinly slice my ham at no additional charge. Slicing a
    ham is a big deal to me because I can never get the slices uniform in size.

    >
    > To the OP...
    >
    > I'm not familiary with BJ's, but I've had many spiral-sliced hams from Honey-Baked Ham over the
    > years. While I do like to bake my own cured smoked hams which have to be sliced after baking, I
    > really do like the Honey-Baked Hams. They are moist and flavorful and the slices are perfect for
    > making sandwiches. They are fully-cooked and ready to serve out of the package, although they can
    > be warmed before serving if desired. You would need to check with BJ's for the particulars
    > regarding their hams, but they are probably quite similar to Honey-Baked Hams.
    >
    > Enjoy the christening and the party!
    >
    > Wayne

    I really like the HB hams. They're pricey where I live but for those occasions when you want a
    really good ham without the fuss of making your own, they're great. As you said, perfectly sliced
    for sandwiches.

    Michael
    --
    "Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of scented
    urine." ~~James Joyce, Irish writer (1882-1941)
     
  14. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> deliciously
    posted in news:[email protected]:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 4ax.com:
    >
    >> On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 18:15:35 -0000, Dog3 <[email protected];not> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is the bone not sliced through?
    >>>
    >> I don't fork over the money for Honey Baked, so I don't know. To my surprise, I can say that I've
    >> never knowingly eaten it at someone's house - although I do know people who say they buy them.
    >>
    >> Are you saying the bone in a H.B. ham is sliced? I'd be surprised if it was because the bones in
    >> spiral hams I've encounterd aren't sliced.
    >
    > No, the bone in HBH is not sliced. The spiral slicing machine slices the entire ham around
    > the bone.
    >
    > Wayne

    Thanks Wayne. I honestly could not remember if the bone was sliced through or not. I *do* remember
    having a chunk left over one time and I made navy beans and ham with it. The bone must have been
    intact. I'll know more in April. I'm serving one up for Easter.

    Michael

    --
    "Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of scented
    urine." ~~James Joyce, Irish writer (1882-1941)
     
  15. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Chris and Bob Neidecker wrote:

    > Actually, I have no idea. I know the meat is spiral sliced, but I'm not sure whether they cut
    > around the bone or not. I don't like ham, so that's why I've never served one of these things
    > before. I said "cut it off the bone," but I guess what I meant was "cut it apart."

    You cut down through the layers, that will make the slices. Seeing as the bone is irregular, you'll
    wind up cutting a few slices at a time, probably. I think you'll be happy with your ham, but I would
    take it out earlier so it's not so cold.

    nancy
     
  16. Dog3 <[email protected];not> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>>
    >>> This doesn't answer your question, but it is relevant. In my experience, spiral-sliced hams (and
    >>> boned hams also) are always markedly inferior in falvor to the intact, bone-in counterparts. I
    >>> guess the extra processing takes its toll. Slicing a ham is not a big deal.
    >>
    >> No, it doesn't answer her question, and I'm sure she wants to hear that the ham she's bought (or
    >> at least planned specifically to buy) is supposedly inferior to hams that aren't spiral-sliced.
    >> Slicing a ham may not be a big deal to you, but it may be to the OP who has a myriad of other
    >> things to do on this occasion.
    >
    > I have bought other hams at the supermarket when I could not or did not want to make the trek to
    > Honey-Baked. The butcher at the supermarket would thinly slice my ham at no additional charge.
    > Slicing a ham is a big deal to me because I can never get the slices uniform in size.

    You're fortunate that the supermarket butcher was willing to slice the ham for you, especially at no
    charge. In my area they will do it, albeit begrudgingly, but with a charge. I've been disappointed
    in most of the supermarket hams I'vwe bought, so have usually gone the HBH route. On occasion,
    though, I will have a ham shipped to me by relatives in MS. Those are really worth baking from
    scratch and even putting up with the slicing. <G>

    >> To the OP...
    >>
    >> I'm not familiary with BJ's, but I've had many spiral-sliced hams from Honey-Baked Ham over the
    >> years. While I do like to bake my own cured smoked hams which have to be sliced after baking, I
    >> really do like the Honey-Baked Hams. They are moist and flavorful and the slices are perfect for
    >> making sandwiches. They are fully-cooked and ready to serve out of the package, although they can
    >> be warmed before serving if desired. You would need to check with BJ's for the particulars
    >> regarding their hams, but they are probably quite similar to Honey-Baked Hams.
    >>
    >> Enjoy the christening and the party!
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    > I really like the HB hams. They're pricey where I live but for those occasions when you want a
    > really good ham without the fuss of making your own, they're great. As you said, perfectly sliced
    > for sandwiches.
    >
    > Michael

    They're pricey here, too, Michael. However, I think the pluses outweigh the minuses. When I
    serve one of these, I know that I don't have to worry about it and can turn my attention to
    everything else.

    Cheers, Wayne
     
  17. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 06:09:27 GMT, "Kent H."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How can you cook a precooked ham????

    To heat is to cook.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
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