Spoke failures

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by MattAussie66, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. MattAussie66

    MattAussie66 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm not light (93kg / 205#) and I have been using an omega19 rim with lotsa spokes (36) for a few years (10?) on the commute bike (freewheel) - originally built by campag - and I try to keep them reasonably true......

    6 weeks back I broke a spoke, non-drive side - first one ever! :(
    3 weeks back I broke a spoke, drive side :mad:
    last night I broke a spoke, drive side :eek:

    Do they all go at the same time? Why?
    Will another one break in 3 weeks time?
    Is it time for me to read all the wheelset threads?
    (actually I have a superbe pro hub that is looking for a velocity OC rim :D)....

    ttfn
    Matt
     
    Tags:


  2. sogood

    sogood New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,148
    Likes Received:
    0
    The fact that they are breaking all at the same time, assuming that the wheel was built well with even tension, then I have to say that Campag's quality control and tolerance is phenomenal! The spokes have all reached their fatigue limit at the same time.

    I'd go out and buy another Campag wheelset to replace it pronto! :D

    Seriously though, it makes sense doesn't it? 10 years is a pretty good service life for a set of wheels. Maybe it's time for that major rebuild or just replace them.
     
  3. meehs

    meehs New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    0
    There are some knowledgable "wheel guys" on this forum. Hopefully they'll see your post and have an explanation for you. I can share a very similar experience that I had.

    I had a set of good wheels that I had been riding on for several years and several thousand miles. I started breaking spokes on the rear wheel just like you are. When the third spoke broke, I brought the wheel into the same local shop I did when each of the first two broke (I'm miserable at wheel work so I don't try to do it myself). An older guy who is a well respected "wheel guy" owns the place and he recognized me and said: "Maybe you ought to just have this wheel relaced. You've broken several spokes now. The hub and rim are fine." He explained that the spokes are probably just fatigued and that's why they were starting to pop.

    Anyway, I went ahead and had him relace the wheel with new spokes. That was two years ago and I haven't broken a spoke since. Maybe you're experiencing the same thing I was.
     
  4. sideshow_bob

    sideshow_bob New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Messages:
    506
    Likes Received:
    0
    the only times i've seen this happen is when the wheel was redone with crap spoke tensions after the initial spoke broke. ie it's been pulled into true but the spoke tensions are all over the place, and it's compounded as you aren't a lightweight.

    i'd say given it's a commuter, that theres probably lots of life left in it, but you should take it someplace where they can fix it properly including checking all the spoke tensions and making sure they are all even.

    --brett
     
  5. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    2,763
    Likes Received:
    0
    Likely spoke fatique. There is no way to reverse it.
    Check spoke tension to see if they are proper (100 kgf drive side) and even.
    If they are and the wheel is true... and the rim not worn,,,, expecially in the brake track areas; just have the wheel rebuilt with new spokes and nipples.
    If not, get going with a new rim.
    At 95 kg, I would pick a Fusion or Deep V 36 spoke rear.
    I build wheels for lots of different applications.
     
  6. jstava

    jstava New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think sideshowBob said it I've always "done my own" and found over my 30 yr cycling time, I've had two problem wheels. The first one was when I didn't have a clue and thought that close was fine. the second was a new wheel which was assembled only (Straight but not tensioned) I finally got the hang of getting it totally straight AND having even tension. Get someone who really knows wheels to look at and you won't break individual spokes, even in a prang.
     
Loading...
Loading...