Spoke Lacing Patterns

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by MeatCloud, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. MeatCloud

    MeatCloud New Member

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    Hi guys... my first post here. Howdy.

    I recently noticed while looking at some mavic wheels:

    The 'Cosmics' spokes are laced crossed over on the drive side and radial on the non drive side.

    The SL's and the ES's and laced radial on the drive side and crossed over on the non drive side.

    That seems really weird to me. I am very interested to know why. How/why is one pattern suited to one style of wheel and vice versa?

    Thanks for any help on this one. The Mavic site seemed to leave me in the dark!

    Cheers
     
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  2. Aussie Steve

    Aussie Steve New Member

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    Drive side spokes are naturally tighter than non-drive side...to allow for freehub, but as far as radial vs cross... funny one that...
    could it be the hubs are designed that way by the French?
    remember that's the country which makes the Citroen, so they will always do strange things...
     
  3. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    Here's what Sheldon says:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

    With half-radial spoking, the amount of dish is very slightly less to begin with if you run the radial spokes up along the inside of its flange ("heads out.") In addition, since there are no "leading" spokes, no amount of torque on the hub can reduce the tension on any of the spokes. In fact, if you have an old wheel that has been breaking left side spokes, "half rebuilding" the wheel into a half radial will solve the problem once and for all.

    Sometimes, rear wheels are spoked half-radial with the radial spokes on the right. This is generally done for reasons of improving derailer clearance, particularly on wheels with unusually thick spokes or unusual flange designs. Such wheels require hubs with greater torsional stiffness since most of the driving torque must then be transferred by the left side spokes.
     
  4. carbonguru

    carbonguru New Member

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    Each wheel when it spins at a high rate of speed actually has at any given time 6-7 spokes that are LOOSE during the orbital rotation of the rim. To combat the natural forces of inertia -- it requires that spoke tension and lacing pattern hold the exact opposite section in place. Combined with Hub and Rim Configurations the spoke lacing pattern acts as an anchor in conjunction with the force being exerted with every pedal stroke. In short, it is a matter of physics that determines the lacing pattern of most wheel builders. Hence, Rolf paired spoke design vs. laced radial design of another. Either one has its strengths and disadvantages. I like to pick wheelsets that will cause me the least amount of pain when a spoke snaps at high speed.:rolleyes:



     
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