Spokes breaking



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M

Mark V

Guest
Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the spokes on
the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period. I haven't touched them since I
got the bike a year ago. Would they be too tight, too loose, or is it normal for smaller wheels (20
inch) to break more often than larger wheels? I would imagine that the front wheel of a SWB would
endure more stress so maybe this can be expected??? Any thoughts?
 
D

Doug Huffman

Guest
THE BICYCLE WHEEL by Jobst Brandt, published by AVOCET of Palo Alto, CA in 1981 (first ed.), 1993
(third ed.) and 1995 ( the latest printing noted in my copy).

Read, understand and practice the technology developed in the book.

There are two books with which EVERY cyclist should be familiar. They are Effective Cycling by John
Forester and Brandt's Bicycle Wheel. You may not agree with anything written but without knowing
what is in these books you'll have no connection with the fundamentals of 'cycling'.

"Mark V" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the spokes on
> the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period. I haven't touched them since
> I got the bike a year ago. Would they be too tight, too loose, or is it normal for smaller wheels
> (20 inch) to break more often than larger wheels? I would imagine that the front wheel of a SWB
> would endure more stress so maybe this can be expected??? Any thoughts?
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Doug Huffman wrote:
> without knowing what is in these books you'll have no connection with the fundamentals of
> 'cycling'.

Oh dear. Looks like I shall have to remain disconnected then.

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
R

Rick Moll

Guest
Mark V wrote:
> Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the spokes on
> the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period. I haven't touched them since
> I got the bike a year ago. Would they be too tight, too loose, or is it normal for smaller wheels
> (20 inch) to break more often than larger wheels? I would imagine that the front wheel of a SWB
> would endure more stress so maybe this can be expected??? Any thoughts?

It is not normal for 20 inch wheels to break spokes more often. They tend to have less problems
since they often have a higher spoke density (more spokes per circumference).

Most likely the wheel was not well built to start with, perhaps it had low spoke tension, or the
spoke lines were not corrected. Now that the wheel has been ridden for a while the spokes have
fatigued and are beginning to break. It's probably best to rebuild the wheel properly with new
spokes. Most likely the hub is fine to reuse, and unless the rim sides have worn from rim brake use,
or the rim has been bent it too can be reused.

Either take the wheel to a good shop (although in my experience it's hard to fine a shop that is
really good at wheel building), or use this as an excuse to learn wheel building.

Rick Moll
 
H

Harv

Guest
Where does Forester recommend carrying concealed firearms? "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]>
wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> THE BICYCLE WHEEL by Jobst Brandt, published by AVOCET of Palo Alto, CA in 1981 (first ed.), 1993
> (third ed.) and 1995 ( the latest printing noted in my copy).
>
> Read, understand and practice the technology developed in the book.
>
> There are two books with which EVERY cyclist should be familiar. They are Effective Cycling by
> John Forester and Brandt's Bicycle Wheel. You may
not
> agree with anything written but without knowing what is in these books you'll have no connection
> with the fundamentals of 'cycling'.
>
>
> "Mark V" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the spokes
> > on the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period. I haven't touched them
> > since I got the bike a year ago. Would they be too tight, too loose, or is it normal for smaller
> > wheels (20 inch) to break more often than larger wheels? I would imagine that the front wheel of
> > a SWB would endure more stress so maybe this can be expected??? Any thoughts?
 
E

Edward Wong

Guest
"Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> THE BICYCLE WHEEL by Jobst Brandt, published by AVOCET of Palo Alto, CA in 1981 (first ed.), 1993
> (third ed.) and 1995 ( the latest printing noted in my copy).
>
> Read, understand and practice the technology developed in the book.
>
> There are two books with which EVERY cyclist should be familiar. They are Effective Cycling by
> John Forester and Brandt's Bicycle Wheel. You may not agree with anything written but without
> knowing what is in these books you'll have no connection with the fundamentals of 'cycling'.

How very eloquent Doug! Now to address the questions/concerns of the gentleman who started the
thread...do these books offer a solution to the problem of breaking spokes? Though judging from the
title of Jobst's book I guess it does.

Edward Wong Orlando, FL
 
D

Doug Huffman

Guest
Unfortunately Mr. Forester lives in the So Socialist Republic (SSR) of Kalifornistan and is
therefore a subject - disarmed - instead of an armed citizen. When it is appropriate I will add my
skill and experience to his orthodoxy and teach cyclists to never accept second class citizen
status. Second class citizens are expected to die quietly and uncomplainingly while First Class
Citizens are allowed to defend themselves and their loved ones.

"harv" <harv*no_spam*@spininternet.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Where does Forester recommend carrying concealed firearms? "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]>
> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > THE BICYCLE WHEEL by Jobst Brandt, published by AVOCET of Palo Alto, CA
in
> > 1981 (first ed.), 1993 (third ed.) and 1995 ( the latest printing noted
in
> > my copy).
> >
> > Read, understand and practice the technology developed in the book.
> >
> > There are two books with which EVERY cyclist should be familiar. They
are
> > Effective Cycling by John Forester and Brandt's Bicycle Wheel. You may
> not
> > agree with anything written but without knowing what is in these books you'll have no connection
> > with the fundamentals of 'cycling'.
> >
> >
> > "Mark V" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> > > Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the
> > > spokes on the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period. I haven't
> > > touched them since I got the bike a year ago. Would they be too tight, too loose, or is it
> > > normal for smaller wheels (20 inch) to break more often than larger wheels? I would imagine
> > > that the front wheel of a SWB would endure more stress so maybe this can be expected??? Any
> > > thoughts?
> >
> >
>
 
N

News.Qwest.Net

Guest
For what it's worth, I had much the same problem with my rear wheel - broke a spoke almost every
time I rode for about 4 months. Asked everybody (and I mean EVERYBODY) I met in the biking world for
advice. Paid to have the wheel retensioned in Missouri. Eventually found a shop here in Phoenix with
a guy who really knows his wheels. He told me he thought that the spokes had been stressed, re-laced
the whole wheel and I've never had a problem since. My advice would be to find the best wheel man
you can and have him replace all the spokes.

Mark

"Mark V" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the spokes on
> the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period. I haven't touched them since
> I got the bike a year ago. Would they be too tight, too loose, or is it normal for smaller wheels
> (20 inch) to break more often than larger wheels? I would imagine that the front wheel of a SWB
> would endure more stress so maybe this can be expected??? Any thoughts?
 
J

Jude T. McGloin

Guest
Mark and Rick have given good advice. I agree, after all I am the Wheel Doctor and a veteran wheel
builder. Just get the wheel rebuilt by a reputable wheel builder. I recieved the Wheel Doctor name
in 1980 while at June Curry's place in Afton, VA. June and her Dad were featured on CBS Sunday
Morning with Charles Krault. For many years they furnished free overnight indoor accomidations for
cyclists and hikers. She became known as the "Cookie Lady". Each year a group of us would help with
upkeep, painting,caulking etc. Well anyway, we were there doing our thing when a groupdoing a
TransAm arrived and one guy with a bent rear wheel had disconnected his brake to make it to June's.
One of my riding buddies offered my skills. I despoked it and with the help of a tree to beat it on
and a flat surface to check it, we got it straight, re-laced, tensioned and trued. The owner, a
teacher from Portland dubbed me the Wheel Doctor. I suggested that he get a new wheel in
Williamsburg. Two weeks later I got a card from him. He was in Key West and the wheel was still
fine. The Wheel Doctor logo has since been on one mobile bike shop van and two LBS. Some frequenters
of this group and BROL are riding on my wheels. So take it from someone who has experience. Just get
it rebuilt or have a new one built.
--
Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
Inc "The Bacchetta Specialist in the Mid-Atlantic" 1-800-586-6645 "news.qwest.net"
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:K%Tya.84$%[email protected]...
> For what it's worth, I had much the same problem with my rear wheel -
broke
> a spoke almost every time I rode for about 4 months. Asked everybody (and
I
> mean EVERYBODY) I met in the biking world for advice. Paid to have the
wheel
> retensioned in Missouri. Eventually found a shop here in Phoenix with a
guy
> who really knows his wheels. He told me he thought that the spokes had
been
> stressed, re-laced the whole wheel and I've never had a problem since. My advice would be to find
> the best wheel man you can and have him replace
all
> the spokes.
>
> Mark
>
> "Mark V" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the spokes
> > on the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period. I haven't touched them
> > since I got the bike a year ago. Would they be too tight, too loose, or is it normal for smaller
> > wheels (20 inch) to break more often than larger wheels? I would imagine that the front wheel of
> > a SWB would endure more stress so maybe this can be expected??? Any thoughts?
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Mark V wrote:
> Can anyone give advise on how to keep spokes from breaking? I have a SMGT and two of the spokes on
> the front wheel have broken at the threaded end in a two week period.

I can't offer any thoughts as to why Mark's spokes are breaking, but a couple of years ago, the rear
wheel of my upright started behaving thus. It was, admittedly, well into its second decade of life,
but had been built by a reputable builder from good quality components. After the fifth spoke broke
at the nipple, I reluctantly shelled out for a new one, which thus far has behaved itself.

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
M

Mark V

Guest
Thanks so much for addressing my question :) I will look for the books as well. Although I've
ridden various bikes since I was 7 years old, I have so much to learn about repairing them. Breaking
spokes is something I've never experienced. I have since taken my wheel to a shop that's been in
business here for at least 20 years and they replaced the broken spokes and corrected the tension on
the others so I'll be watching it closely. If another breaks, I'll just get the whole wheel reworked
like you suggested. I've always subscribed to the theory that if you want something done right, you
have to do it yourself. So... I may just invest in the equipment, get all the books and get
connected :)
 
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