Sports Drink Question

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by PeterF, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I am trying to determine the most economical and effective way to satisfy my hydration needs. I have used both the GU drink mix as well as Accelerade, but have found that buying bottles of Gatorade or Powerade to be just as cheap (or cheaper) and certainly easier to use. What have you found to be the best method of hydration. I ride 5 days a week and use a total of 7 24 oz bottles. I like the taste of the Accelerade, but the 56 serving can at $35 doesn't seem to be that economical. Any advice would be appreciated. Right now it's pretty hot up here in New England, so my hydration needs are at their highest. Am I getting the same benefit from the ready made store bought drinks? Thoughts?
    :confused:
     
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  2. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    It is supposed to be haqrd to find, and in my store they are dust covered, but I have powdered Gatorade, which is extremely affordable. I don't know however if cheap means good, but for now it is what I use.

    I don't know how much longer it will be available if others are having trouble finding it.

    Just found:

    http://www.toolbarn.com/category/drinkmixes/

    $8.15 for 6 gallons
     
  3. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    Personally, I drink plain water and take 2 Endurolyte tablets (Hammer Nutrition, $15.95 for a bottle of 120 tablets) every 2 hours after the first hour. It's a lot cheaper than any of the sports drinks.
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    i'm not entirely sure what these tablets are... but aren't they just electrolyte tablets? In other words where do you get your on the bike energy from? Taking in carbohydrates while training will lead to significant increases in performance

    ric
     
  5. camhabib

    camhabib New Member

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    I have also been using the powdered Gatorade mix. I bought one gallon bottle of the pre-mixed stuff and since finishing it within a few days have been using it to mix up new batches in. Can't tell the difference and can't get a much cheaper drink.

    -Cameron
     
  6. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    Correct. Maybe water + honey/jam sandwiches + dried figs + electrolyte tablets is a cost effective solution? I still like my sports drink powder.

    Incidentally, can you (or someone else) tell me how electrolyte requirments vary with sweat rates and, as a more useful proxy, temperature? Is there any requirement for electrolytes over and above those found in normal sports drinks, if so under what conditions and what levels of each electrolyte should be taken in at what rate to avoid imbalances?
     
  7. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    Yes, they are electrolyte tablets. I also eat bananas and fig bars for energy/carbos. They're also pretty cheap.
     
  8. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    Note that water will drain from your stomach slower than a 6-8% CHO mix, meaning what you are doing is likely to be slightly less effective at meeting your calorie and hydration needs than sports drink. I do similar things to you though, in terms of nutrition, as long as I'm not near my limits in terms of CHO/fluid requirements (eg I'll rely on sandwiches, fruit and water on some training rides that are not extremely hot or long and hard - but definitely not long races), and I don't see any harm in that as long as you also spend some time training with whatever nutrition products you plan to use when you race (cardinal rule - never try something for the first time in a race). It's also worth noting that you may be able to replace CHO faster and still effectively hydrate with a solution of up to ~18% CHO provided the CHO is predominantly maltodextrin. This solution should drain from your stomach faster than water but slower than the 6-8% solution. Such concentrations can be achieved easily by using gel and sports drink. I would be reticent to push CHO concentrations up too much on a hot day, but that's just me.
     
  9. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    Those are good points. Admittedly, I haven't been overly concerned since I don't plan on racing until next Spring but I will have to experiment with several drinks and gels as the time approaches. Frankly, one of my problems is that I hate the sweet, sticky after-taste in my mouth that some of the products leave. Water doesn't have that effect on me. Anyway, thanks for the info.
     
  10. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    Yeah, I think that is a problem for a lot of people. Finding nice tasting sports nutrition is hard. There are a few solutions. My normal one is 'suck it up'. This allows me to use whatever product I can get cheaply. :)

    Another good alternative is to try a range of products. I particularly like Carboshotz raspberry flavour, which isn't too sweet at all. Unfortunately I haven't been able to find it in the US and it is expensive as all get out. I think you can order it from Canada if money is no object. I also like Carboshotz gels, much less sweet tasting and better flavour than most. Also they are thinner and less 'gunky', despite having plenty of CHO (more than most). Anyway, I don't mean to sound like an advertisement - I am mainly using powergel now because of a sponsor but out of all the products I've tried that are easily available in the US I like GU chocolate, coffee, and plain flavours the best though chocolate has 1g of fat and is a bit sickly on hot days (see - this is why I stay anon on forums... I can be honest without pissing off sponsors).

    Lastly, I find adding a small amount of salt takes away the sickly taste of most sports drinks. I'm not sure what effect this has on fluid/electrolyte balance so I don't do it much. If anyone has info on electrolyte balance please post as I feel detailed knowledge of this is crucial, but missing from my understanding of sports nutrition.

    Good luck finding products you like and good luck with your racing.
     
  11. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    Good input. Thanks. Actually, I found a place in Miami that appears to carry Carboshotz (http://www.g-c-t.com/pro/nutrition.html). I may give it a try. Does anybody else have a suggestion for a sports drink with a relatively neutral after-taste?
     
  12. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    i can't recall off the top of my head (and don't have time before coaching to go and check), but there's a few places you can check
    1) Pub-Med and do some searches for Ron Maughan
    2) GSSI
    3) Lucozade sports institute

    If i recall correctly (and i may not!), most (all??) sports drinks don't provide enough electrolytes due to palatability issues (in lab studies i've had drinks that have been specially made up and taste very salty).

    ric

    edit: on the MSSE web site, there's a position stand on nutrition and that *may* give ideas on electrolyte requirement
     
  13. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    i find the best drinks are the ones that taste awful off the bike ;) at home i like a nice fruit tasting drink with plenty of flavour. on the bike i prefer a weaker tasting, more neutral flavoured drink that doesn't over power my taste buds.

    personally, i like the GO drinks from www.scienceinsport.com. what was interesting was that the Disco team in this years TdF were using their isotonic gels, even though they're sponsoed by Power Bar. There's a couple of photos around where you can see them using the gels if you look carefully enough!

    ric
     
  14. kvl1027

    kvl1027 New Member

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    I usually use a half gatorade half water mix in my bottles, and then eat a cliff bar half way through the ride. Usually does the trick for me!
     
  15. astroluc

    astroluc New Member

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    I split between water and Gatorade/Propel; I stay away from Powerade because it contains HFCS (High Fructose Corn Syrup), which is about the worst thing you could put into your body.
     
  16. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    What is wrong with High Fructose Corn Syrup?
     
  17. astroluc

    astroluc New Member

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    boy, am I glad you asked this question! (rant follows)

    Read the ingredients in your food! AVOID HFCS (High Fructose Corn Syrup) at all costs. It is everywhere and in so many types of foods! The problem with obesity in the US can be traced with a line paralell to the growing use of HFCS as a sweetener in the US since the late 70s. HFCS metabolizes in the body much more readily into FAT rather than energy; so the body has to work harder to burn it. HFCS can also send the intestines into a sort of shock, producing all sorts of intestinal distress.

    Here are some articles if you want to read up on it; here , here, here, and especially
    here

    HFCS is in:
    -bread (all kinds of bread products)
    -Hotdogs (most types)
    -Soda (non-diet)
    -"Fruit" Juices
    -Sauces of all kinds (worcestershire, BBQ, honeymustard, cranberry, etc...)
    -sports drinks (not Gatorade)
    -most Energy Bars! (supposedly healthy!!)
    -too many more to list!

    For the past year I have made a point to avoid HFCS in all its forms. Previous to doing this I had digestion problems. For many years I suspected a lactose intolerance issue, but was unable to lock it down; since eliminating HFCS from my diet these problems have become much less pronounced! I can eat dairy (organic) with no problem and I have also been much less bloated in the mid-section; all my pants fit like they should! For a while, my only guilty pleasure was Ketchup, but I have since found a organic Ketchup with no HFCS that tastes better anyway!

    It is in so many food items we consume; why not be aware of it and at least make a decision about whether or not to eat it? and just for the record and an FYI, I am not an earthy crunchy type... I eat meat of all kinds, though I do limit what I take in for health reasons...
    "not that there is anything wrong with that!!" ;)
     
  18. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    Fructose does follow a different metabolic pathway to other sugars. This may be a negative in some circumstances, though I have no knowledge of this and thus won't make any claim either way. It is a positive while exercising as utilising multiple pathways allows a higher total oxidation rate for exogenous CHO. That is - a small amount of fructose in your sports drink is likely to be a good thing if you want to maximise performance in endurance events. Fructose has been reported to lead to gastro-intestinal upset at high intakes, so you don't want too much of it. This problem seems to be variable from person to person, so it is good to go off experience - as I have already said, try different sports drinks and see what works. Obviously, don't use a product for the first time in a race situation - especially an important race.
     
  19. astroluc

    astroluc New Member

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    Fructose is not the same, chemically, as High-Fructose Corn Syrup... I agree that Fructose is a neccessary and important sugar; but there are much better ways to get it than through HFCS... read the articles behind the links I posted for more info than I can give.


    this fact you stated is a very important one, considering how many items people consume that contain HFCS without knowing... on any givin day, your average American (even a health conscious American) OVERDOSES on HFCS due to the fact that is is in so many food items.
     
  20. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    You mean because HFCS contains 45% glucose as well as fructose? Sounds like an excellent addition to a sports drink, in combination with other highly processed, simple sugars - ideally maltodextrins and some sucrose, as well as sodium, potassium and possibly magnesium. Of course, when not exercising or immediately post-exercise I would advise, like almost every other sane person, minimising the amount of this stuff you consume (including limiting straight glucose, maltodextrin and sucrose too, within reason). The goals and the physiology of nutrition for athletes during intense endurance exercise are very different to those of the general population at rest.
     
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