Sports writer researching nutrition article

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Greg Connors, May 26, 2003.

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  1. Greg Connors

    Greg Connors Guest

    I am a sports writer for the daily newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y. I am researching a story on sports
    nutrition, and I am interested in hearing from anyone who is familiar with any cutting-edge
    approaches to nutrition and sports performance. I find the best-selling sports nutrition books
    mostly recommend the FDA food pyramid, but how does the Atkins diet approach fit in for athletes? Or
    are there other new approaches worth exploring? I'd appreciate direct e-mail replies to:
    [email protected] My deadline is the end of this week, May 30, 2003. Thanks.
     
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  2. >From: [email protected] (Greg Connors)

    >I am a sports writer for the daily newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y. I am researching a story on sports
    >nutrition, and I am interested in hearing from anyone who is familiar with any cutting-edge
    >approaches to nutrition and sports performance. I find the best-selling sports nutrition books
    >mostly recommend the FDA food pyramid<<

    No they don't. Are you on crack?
     
  3. Jim Gosse

    Jim Gosse Guest

    During an interview with Dr. Atkins on Larry King, a caller called in questioning the atkins
    approach, and made the point about marathon runners eating high carb diets, and are very lean. Dr.
    Atkins replied that with the amount of training world class marathoners carry out, they need all the
    carbs. He also said normal people could eat up to 100 or more grams of carbs a day based on their
    level of activity, after they have reached their preferred weight.

    The Larry King Interview might be a potential source of research.


    "Greg Connors" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am a sports writer for the daily newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y. I am researching a story on sports
    > nutrition, and I am interested in hearing from anyone who is familiar with any cutting-edge
    > approaches to nutrition and sports performance. I find the best-selling sports nutrition books
    > mostly recommend the FDA food pyramid, but how does the Atkins diet approach fit in for athletes?
    > Or are there other new approaches worth exploring? I'd appreciate direct e-mail replies to:
    > [email protected] My deadline is the end of this week, May 30, 2003. Thanks.
     
  4. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "Jim Gosse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > During an interview with Dr. Atkins on Larry King, a caller called in questioning the atkins
    > approach, and made the point about marathon runners eating high carb diets, and are very lean. Dr.
    > Atkins replied that with
    the
    > amount of training world class marathoners carry out, they need all the carbs. He also said normal
    > people could eat up to 100 or more grams of
    carbs
    > a day based on their level of activity, after they have reached their preferred weight.
    >
    > The Larry King Interview might be a potential source of research.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Greg Connors" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I am a sports writer for the daily newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y. I am researching a story on sports
    > > nutrition, and I am interested in hearing from anyone who is familiar with any cutting-edge
    > > approaches to nutrition and sports performance. I find the best-selling sports nutrition books
    > > mostly recommend the FDA food pyramid, but how does the Atkins diet approach fit in for
    > > athletes? Or are there other new approaches worth exploring? I'd appreciate direct e-mail
    > > replies to: [email protected] My deadline is the end of this week, May 30, 2003. Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
    You are asking a very complex question. Is the "athlete" recreational or professional? Is the
    athlete primarily in an aerobic or non-aerobic sport? Try posting this question to
    alt.support.diet.low-carb and misc.fitness.weights. Search for "targeted ketogenic diet" (TKD) and
    "cyclic ketogenic diet" (CKD) and "the ketogenic diet" and "lyle mcdonald".

    Personally, I'm doing a TKD, but then I only work out about 3-5 hours a week.

    --
    Bob ctviggen at rcn dot com
     
  5. Pbeyer

    Pbeyer Guest

    Greg Connors wrote:

    > I am a sports writer for the daily newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y. I am researching a story on sports
    > nutrition, and I am interested in hearing from anyone who is familiar with any cutting-edge
    > approaches to nutrition and sports performance. I find the best-selling sports nutrition books
    > mostly recommend the FDA food pyramid, but how does the Atkins diet approach fit in for athletes?
    > Or are there other new approaches worth exploring? I'd appreciate direct e-mail replies to:
    > [email protected] My deadline is the end of this week, May 30, 2003. Thanks.

    If you think that the pyramid comes from the FDA and don't know how Adkins diets fit in with
    athletes, I'd suggest you bypass this deadline and do a lot more reading.
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "pbeyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Greg Connors wrote:
    >
    > > I am a sports writer for the daily newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y. I am researching a story on sports
    > > nutrition, and I am interested in hearing from anyone who is familiar with any cutting-edge
    > > approaches to nutrition and sports performance. I find the best-selling sports nutrition books
    > > mostly recommend the FDA food pyramid, but how does the Atkins diet approach fit in for
    > > athletes? Or are there other new approaches worth exploring? I'd appreciate direct e-mail
    > > replies to: [email protected] My deadline is the end of this week, May 30, 2003. Thanks.
    >
    > If you think that the pyramid comes from the FDA and don't know how Adkins diets fit in with
    > athletes, I'd suggest you bypass this deadline and do a lot more reading.
    >
    >

    This is true, as it's the USDA that recommends the food pyramid. For an article about "rebuilding"
    the food pyramid, see:

    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=0007C5B6-7152-1DF6-9733809EC588EE DF

    --
    Bob ctviggen at rcn dot com
     
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