Spraypainting a bike.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jacobe Hazzard, Jun 20, 2003.

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  1. Hi, I want to spraypaint my bike, mostly flat colours with stensiled overlays. Does anyone have
    suggestions for good types of paint or methods to use? Best way to clean the (steel) frame? Do I
    need to remove the existing paint? Do I need special rust precautions?

    I thought an enamel based hobby type paint would adhere directly to the frame, and provide adequate
    protection from the elements.

    Thanks,

    Adam
     
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  2. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Jacobe Hazzard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Hi, I want to spraypaint my bike, mostly flat colours with stensiled overlays. Does anyone have
    > suggestions for good types of paint or methods to use?
    Best
    > way to clean the (steel) frame? Do I need to remove the existing paint? Do
    I
    > need special rust precautions?
    >
    > I thought an enamel based hobby type paint would adhere directly to the frame, and provide
    > adequate protection from the elements.

    I have painted several bikes over the years. As always, surface preparation is the biggest concern.
    There are plenty of sites out there that tell you how to prep a metal surface for paint. Get it
    smooth and be sure it is completely clean of dust from the sanding and oil from your hands before
    spraying. I prefer to sand down to the metal, although this isn't always necessary. The owner of the
    last bike I painted wrapped an uncovered chain around the top tube and let the lock dangle in the
    triangle. The top tube was completely covered in rust and the other tubes had rusty spots where the
    lock had chipped through the paint. But none of the rust was deep and it was all easily sanded down
    to bare metal. I would question the integrity of a frame that had really deep rust pits.

    I have found that the automotive-type touch-up paints are just too fragile for bicycle use. They
    nick and scratch too easily. Krylon seems to have a much more durable finish. A good base coat of
    primer will help the finish layers to bond. As for protection from the environment, Krylon is pretty
    amazing. I repainted a wrought-iron bench with semi-gloss black a few years ago. Despite sitting in
    direct sun and the Texas heat, it shows no signs of fading, chipping, peeling or cracking. It also
    seems to hold up to bicycle abuse as well.

    I can't say anything about hobby paints because I haven't tried them. I'm sure they will adhere to a
    properly prepped frame just fine, but I would worry about the durability of the finish.

    Good luck, Buck
     
  3. NuTz4BiKeZ

    NuTz4BiKeZ New Member

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    I have used general purpose spray cans with pretty good results... in fact the paint stands up better than the frame I had done at an auto spray shop.:rolleyes:
     
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