Spring clean

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by elyob, Feb 17, 2006.

  1. elyob

    elyob Guest

    Right, the bike needs a spring clean. I haven't really done much mileage
    this year (the annual New Year slump), but got a chance to go out at sunset
    today. Bit chilly when dark, wish I'd managed to get away an hour earlier.
    Right, tomorrow I need a trip to the LBS, and need some advice on stuff to
    get.

    Firstly, my derailleur seized up on the large sprocket. I noticed it was
    prety tough trying to get it up there, and it wouldn't go back down. A bit
    of history, my bike was left a little mucky after my last ride. Not
    terrible, but I feel a little guilty.

    So, I'm going to replace all the cables (need doing anyway), and clean all
    the gearing etc. Shall I just take the old ones off, label them and take
    them in the LBS? Or wlil they know the lengths I need?

    I have one of those SRAM chains that are supposed to be easy to take off.
    I've never found them that easy, what's the technique? White spirit to clean
    the chain? How about the sprockets? How about my SPD pedals?

    Anything else I should do when I'm stripping the bike down? (I may replace
    some of the rusty allen bolts too).

    Thanks
     
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  2. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    elyob wrote:
    > Firstly, my derailleur seized up on the large sprocket. I noticed it was
    > prety tough trying to get it up there, and it wouldn't go back down. A bit
    > of history, my bike was left a little mucky after my last ride. Not
    > terrible, but I feel a little guilty.
    >
    > So, I'm going to replace all the cables (need doing anyway), and clean all
    > the gearing etc. Shall I just take the old ones off, label them and take
    > them in the LBS? Or wlil they know the lengths I need?


    I expect they'll use standard length cables (much longer than you need)
    and cut them down to size. Or they'll sell you standard length cables
    and you can cut them down to size yourself, if you're planning to do the
    job yourself, in which case you'll want one of these:
    <URL:http://wiggle.co.uk/Default.aspx?Main=ProductDetail.aspx&W=0&Manufacturer=&UberCatName=&Cat=cycle&CategoryName=&ProdID=5360011237&UberCat=0>

    If it's that bad, it's probably worth replacing the cable housing at the
    same time. I've no idea whether an LBS would do that by default, as
    I've always replaced my own cables.

    I replaced the cable housing for my rear gear cable last weekend (I've
    been putting it off for a couple of years, because it's a PITA to do on
    the Street Machine) and my gears now shift like a dream. Of course, I
    changed the cable and gave the derailleur a really good clean while I
    was at it.

    The old housing turned out to be rusty inside. For the last few months
    I'd had trouble using the smallest sprockets because the derailleur
    spring wasn't strong enough to drag the cable through the housing. I'd
    had trouble using the biggest sprockets because my fingers weren't
    strong enough to drag the cable through the housing. Monday morning's
    ride to work was a revelation, when I went to change down a gear and
    before I knew it I'd changed down 3!

    On the subject of cable housing, does anyone know what the difference is
    between this:
    <URL:http://wiggle.co.uk/Default.aspx?Main=ProductDetail.aspx&W=0&Manufacturer=&UberCatName=&Cat=cycle&CategoryName=&ProdID=5360011237&UberCat=0>
    (Transfil Shimano Outer Brake Casing)

    and this:
    <URL:http://wiggle.co.uk/Default.aspx?Main=ProductDetail.aspx&W=0&Manufacturer=&UberCatName=&Cat=cycle&CategoryName=&ProdID=5360011240&UberCat=0>
    (Transfil Outer Gear Casing)

    Apart from the price? I used the brake casing for my gear cable, simply
    because that's what I happened to have. It works perfectly well.

    --
    Danny Colyer <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
    Subscribe to PlusNet <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/referral/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  3. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > On the subject of cable housing, does anyone know what the difference is
    > between this:
    > <URL:http://wiggle.co.uk/Default.aspx?Main=ProductDetail.aspx&W=0&Manufacturer=&UberCatName=&Cat=cycle&CategoryName=&ProdID=5360011237&UberCat=0>
    > (Transfil Shimano Outer Brake Casing)
    >
    > and this:
    > <URL:http://wiggle.co.uk/Default.aspx?Main=ProductDetail.aspx&W=0&Manufacturer=&UberCatName=&Cat=cycle&CategoryName=&ProdID=5360011240&UberCat=0>
    > (Transfil Outer Gear Casing)
    >
    > Apart from the price? I used the brake casing for my gear cable, simply
    > because that's what I happened to have. It works perfectly well.


    Oh Danny, how long have you been reading this ng? Guess where I'm going to
    send you!

    http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ho-z.html#housing

    cheers,
    clive
     
  4. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Clive George wrote:
    > Oh Danny, how long have you been reading this ng? Guess where I'm going to
    > send you!
    >
    > http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ho-z.html#housing


    Thanks Clive.

    Almost certainly not worth paying the extra for the compressionless
    housing, then, for the cable routing on the Street Machine.

    --
    Danny Colyer <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
    Subscribe to PlusNet <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/referral/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  5. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    elyob wrote:
    ........
    > So, I'm going to replace all the cables (need doing anyway), and
    > clean all the gearing etc. Shall I just take the old ones off, label
    > them and take them in the LBS? Or wlil they know the lengths I need?


    Get standard long lengths (inners & outers) and cut to size. Overly long
    inner cables are easier to fit and tension anyway (something to get hold
    of). Maybe now's a good time to get some decent cutters if you don't have
    any good ones ;-)

    > I have one of those SRAM chains that are supposed to be easy to take
    > off. I've never found them that easy, what's the technique?


    Keeping it all in line, with fingers and thumbs and no tools, compress
    sideways at the same time as pushing links together lengthwise, then
    wiggle.

    > White spirit to clean the chain?


    That's my favourite, in a jar.

    > How about the sprockets?


    Just about any old solvent or degreaser on a rag or brush.

    > How about my SPD pedals?


    Oil the springs and tension adjuster screws. Do nothing to the insides if
    a model with cartridge bearings and they feel OK, otherwise /maybe/ grease
    the bearings. LBS should supply suitable tools and grease.

    > Anything else I should do when I'm stripping the bike down?


    Oil derailleur and brake pivots. Remove and service derailleur jockey
    wheels. Remove, grease, refit: pedals, seatpost, stem if traditional
    quill type. Service headset and hubs (if serviceable type) if you think
    they're probably dirty or dry inside. Sand brake pads.

    ~PB
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    I scribbled:
    > elyob wrote:
    >> I have one of those SRAM chains that are supposed to be easy to take
    >> off. I've never found them that easy, what's the technique?

    >
    > Keeping it all in line, with fingers and thumbs and no tools, compress
    > sideways at the same time as pushing links together lengthwise, then
    > wiggle.


    Of course I'm assuming the chain has a Powerlink!

    ~PB
     
  7. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, elyob
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > So, I'm going to replace all the cables (need doing anyway), and clean
    > all the gearing etc. Shall I just take the old ones off, label them and
    > take them in the LBS?


    No.

    > Or wlil they know the lengths I need?


    Yes - unless you've got something very exotic.

    > I have one of those SRAM chains that are supposed to be easy to take
    > off. I've never found them that easy, what's the technique?


    Find the joining link. Pinch the two links adjacent to the joining link
    together, so that you're slightly squeezing the joining link along its
    length. Then with your other hand pinch the sideplates of the joining
    link together. The pins will slide in their grooves. Now you can simply
    pull the sideplates apart, et voila!

    > White
    > spirit to clean the chain?


    Yes.

    > How about the sprockets?


    Same.

    > How about my SPD
    > pedals?


    Water, with a little washing up liquid, and a soft brush. Do not immerse
    them or direct jets of water at them. If they've become grunchy
    disassemble them, replace any damaged bearings, grease the bearings and
    reassemble. Most pedals use cup-and-cone bearings like bicycle wheels
    and the trick with adjusting them is pretty much the same (except
    generally more fiddly) - tighten them up until you can't jiggle them
    about, but no further.

    > Anything else I should do when I'm stripping the bike down? (I may
    > replace some of the rusty allen bolts too).


    Check how worn the chain is, and also how worn the cassette is. If the
    chain has enlongated beyond its wear limit (see
    <URL:http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html> replace the chain, and if
    it's greatly beyond its wear limit, replace the cassette as well.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    [ This mind intentionally left blank ]
     
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