SRAM quick link question



F

Fritz

Guest
I am planning on buying a new Shimano 9 speed chain. I would like to
use a SRAM quicklink on it instead of the special pin.

The SRAM quicklink I am going to be using is off a worn out chain.
The worn out chain had 1/16 of an inch of wear in a span of 12 inches.

Should this be avoided because of extra wear on the cassette?

Thanks for the input
 
Fritz wrote:
> I am planning on buying a new Shimano 9 speed chain. I would like to
> use a SRAM quicklink on it instead of the special pin.
>
> The SRAM quicklink I am going to be using is off a worn out chain.
> The worn out chain had 1/16 of an inch of wear in a span of 12 inches.
>
> Should this be avoided because of extra wear on the cassette?


It'll probably work but it's advisable to use a new Powerlink with a new
chain because Powerlink pins wear just like all the other pins.

~PB
 
Fritz wrote:
> I am planning on buying a new Shimano 9 speed chain. I would like to
> use a SRAM quicklink on it instead of the special pin.
>
> The SRAM quicklink I am going to be using is off a worn out chain.
> The worn out chain had 1/16 of an inch of wear in a span of 12 inches.
>
> Should this be avoided because of extra wear on the cassette?
>
> Thanks for the input

Pop for the $4 for a new SRAM link. Possible early failure if you try to
cheap out and keep the old one.
 
Why not just buy a SRAM chain that comes with a powerlink? I've never
tried a SRAM chain, but hear they work well.

-Nate
 
Llatikcuf wrote:
>
> Why not just buy a SRAM chain that comes with a powerlink? I've never
> tried a SRAM chain, but hear they work well.


I have been using SRAM chains with powerlink for years on my commuting bike.
This sprint I put a new SRAM chain on my raceing bike. I have never had any
problems with the powerlink.

On my commuting bike I switch between 3 chains. While one chain is on the
bike, one is cleaned and ready to be put on the bike whenever needed, while
the third is being cleaned.

--
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes
http://www.dahl-stamnes.net/dahls/
 
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes wrote:
> On my commuting bike I switch between 3 chains. While one chain is on the
> bike, one is cleaned and ready to be put on the bike whenever needed, while
> the third is being cleaned.


This method could be carried beyond 3 chains...

A standard chain must be replaced to avoid excessive wear on the cassette. In
average, a cassette lasts 5, maybe 6 chains before the wear goes too far making
the cassette incompatible with a new chain. Standard chains are probably able to
last more than that - at least under normal use - as several reports from
riders who used the chain for ~ twice the "normal" lifetime seem to demonstrate.
Furthermore, near the end of the lifetime of the cassette, a new chain needs
some time to "break in", time where some skipping cannot be avoided. I have
this usually at the last chain before I replace the cassette.

Now, imagine a scenario where a new cassette is coupled with - say - ten chains.
The ten chains are rotated periodically (every month or so) and - when not in
use - they are kept well protected against rust (e.g. well greased or in an
oil bath). By doing this, the ten chains adapt themselves to the wear of the
cassette even when this is no longer compatible with a new chain.

The only "weak link" in all this could be the replacement pin. But the Quick
Link approach bypasses this problem (a new link could be used every 5000 Km,
or each chain could be given its own quick link).

The advantages? Replace-and-clean approach, several spares - all well adapted
to the wear of the chain and a cassette that lasts the double...

Disadvantages? Using a chain beyond the common pattern could make it break...
Also, the chains may become incompatible with a new cassette (on-the-field
replacement, for example, or multiple cassettes rotated according to the
conditions). As a matter of fact, I have never tried to use a worn-out chain
on a new cassette...

Any extra thoughts?

Ciao,
--
Roberto Divia` Love at first sight is one of the greatest
Dep:pH Bat:53 Mailbox:C02110 labour-saving devices the world has ever seen
Route de Meyrin 385 ---------------------------------------------
Case Postale Phone: +41-22-767-4994
CH-1211 Geneve 23 CERN Fax: +41-22-767-9585
Switzerland E-Mail: [email protected]
 
On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 07:48:14 -0400, John Forrest Tomlinson
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 12:22:54 +0200, Roberto Divia
><[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>Any extra thoughts?

>
>It's just a bicycle.
>
>JT



No , no , no. My bike is part of the family.
 
I much more recommend the Superlink III it is manufactured by the
Forster tool company and is actually the design that the Powerlink is
licensed from. These links are distributed by www.lickbike.com.

This is a much superior link to the Powerlink for several reasons,
first, the superlink has a tab that does not allow it to be released
when it is in line with the chain, it actually has to be turned 90^ so
that it is perpendicular to the chain. Additionally and more
importantly the link is first stamped then brazed and finally plated
making it much stronger than the powerlink wich is only stamped.

I hope that this information helps

Joshua McClure
Durst Cycles
 

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