Sram vs. shimano components?



bianchi10

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Oct 28, 2009
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Long time since I have been on here. Im on my phone so I didn't do a search, though im sure there are several threads about this topic so I apologize in advance. His last bike was geared with shimano ultegra components and he loved it. He had to sell it due to finances but is ready to get another one. He is looking to stay under $3k. As of right now he seems to be heading towards a focus or pinarrelo. The focus comes with sram components which has him squimish about purchasing it since he has heard mixed reviews and opinions. Neither him or myself have ridden much with sram other than a couple circles in a parking lot so i wasnted to get some of your opinions. What I have gathered from others is of course its a personal thing. Some just like shimano and others like. He sram set up. - what do you think about sram force componenets vs shimano? - any pro's or cons to consider?
 
Both are good, although I only have 2nd hand experience with red. My teammates love sram red, although a few of these folks work for sram and may be biased. I am running dura ace and love it. I agree that it is a personal thing as both are good components. Despite running DA (it came on my already built up bike) I have a sweet spot for sram, not only because I know folks who work there, but being a local company they run neutral support at a lot of our races and do a really terrific job. If/when I am in the market for new components, I'd probably go with sram just to support their business.
 
Originally Posted by bianchi10 .

Long time since I have been on here. Im on my phone so I didn't do a search, though im sure there are several threads about this topic so I apologize in advance.

His last bike was geared with shimano ultegra components and he loved it. He had to sell it due to finances but is ready to get another one. He is looking to stay under $3k. As of right now he seems to be heading towards a focus or pinarrelo. The focus comes with sram components which has him squimish about purchasing it since he has heard mixed reviews and opinions. Neither him or myself have ridden much with sram other than a couple circles in a parking lot so i wasnted to get some of your opinions. What I have gathered from others is of course its a personal thing. Some just like shimano and others like. He sram set up.

- what do you think about sram force componenets vs shimano?
- any pro's or cons to consider?
Shimano without question. Better chainrings, better BBs, better shifting particularly the front derailleur. When many get sram Red, they get a 'Force' FD, cogset and shimano chain..that speaks volumes. shimano is more refined, better looking(IMO) and more reliable.
 
coke or pepsi / blue or red/ iphone or android/ team jacob or team edward/ facebook or twitter/ colbert or steward/ chicken or beef
 
Originally Posted by jagonz456 .

coke or pepsi / blue or red/ iphone or android/ team jacob or team edward/ facebook or twitter/ colbert or steward/ chicken or beef

coke/blue/android/vampiressuck/cxmagazine.com/stewart/chicken/campagnolo

for me the difference lies in the shifter function. i just don't like sram's double tap shifting. i like a lot about sram, having ridden it many times on bikes that are not my own, but i'll never buy it because i don't want to have to re-learn my shift timing. others i know have loved it from the first ride.
double tap. try it. see for yourself how it feels. it's definitely a change, but that could be a good or bad thing.
 
I've got bikes with both. They both work fine. They both have their quirks. But here's the stuff I notice.
Brakes- I like the Force. Never notice any fade on decents like with Ultegra. Could be the pads/wheels though.
Rear shifting - Up shifting is super quick and precise on SRAM and I prefer it. Over 8000 on a Force group and I haven't adjusted the rear derraileur once. I prefer Shimano for downshifts. It uses the brake lever rather than the shorter, thinner shifter lever. Feels more solid and takes less force.
Front shifting - Same issue on the lever but on upshifts. I do have to adjust the SRAM front derrailleur pretty often. Since the it does not have the trim adjustment (half click) on the shifter, the slightest cable stretch requires adjusting to keep everything running silent.
Cranks - Sram tend to loosen on left side. Requires occassional torquing it down. I've had it happen on Shimano too. SRAM BB is quiet and the carbon crank arms seem stiff enough for me.
Hoods - The nod goes to Shimano. The SRAM hoods are smaller. My hands aren't mitts or anything, but large enough to prefer the bigger Shimano hoods. Makes me ride in the drops more. Maybe a plus.

Overall, I could go with either one. I certainly would not hesitate to buy a bike with either group. They are both quality and function well.
 
I have been in love with Sram since the first time I worked on it when Rival and Force first came out. The shifting is quick and confident and the brakes have excellent modulation and stopping power. The only complaint that I have is that the Red front derailleur is not as stiff as it could be (Hence why pros get special Red front ders with steel cages). This can be fixed by using a Force front derailleur. Some people also complain the the Red lever chain and cassette are a little bit noisy due to the hollow cassette and hollow pins and sidewalls of the chain. Once again, an easy fix is to use a Force chain and cassette in order to quiet it down for the price of a small weight gain. Sram also tends to be more affordable and lighter weight than its competitors comparable groups.
 
As posted above they noth are good with slightly different featers. Put your hands around the hoods and get the one that feels best.
 
Coke beef sram android blue stewert....The SRAM is just built better because they are the "other guys" and have to try harder. Shimano skated by on its basically monopolistic name for so long. SRAM had to step it up....which is good cuz it made Shimano step it up. God bless the free market and god bless America! Bike Mechanics (which i am not) mostly say SRAM needs less adjusting babying whatever. I have a simple 3x10 x7 set up which performs flawless! Im sure id like deore and above also but SRAM really is impressive.
 
I have both Shimano- and SRAM-equipped bikes and can echo most of what the previous posters have said. Although I've been using Shimano for the longest time, I do feel that SRAM is a breath of fresh air.

Shimano
Pros:
- Shifting is very precise (assuming everything is correctly tuned)
- Braking control (modulation) is good to excellent
- Very ergonomic hoods
- Tried and tested
- Easier to set up and tune (I have plenty of experience on Shimano)
Cons:
- Single cog shifting (both on up- and down-shifts)
- Non-adjustable lever reach

SRAM
Pros:
- Shifting is very precise as well
- Multiple cog shifts on the down-shift
- Provision for reach adjustment
Cons:
- Braking is a good to excellent as well, but sometimes I find it lacking
- Small hoods, feels like I'm missing something
- More difficult to tune. Had several chain drops while tuning the FD on the stand
 
Originally Posted by drummerboy1248 .

... I do have to adjust the SRAM front derrailleur pretty often. Since the it does not have the trim adjustment (half click) on the shifter...
It does. My Red shifters have them, and so does Force.

From the SRAM website:

Working in tandem with the SRAM Force DoubleTap® controls, the SRAM Force Front Derailleur allows you to trim your shifting on the big chainring for seamless gear changes.

Never needed the trim on my Red-equipped bike, even on extreme gear combinations (52x25, 39x12). It's a different story for Shimano though.
 
Originally Posted by e_guevara .

I have both Shimano- and SRAM-equipped bikes and can echo most of what the previous posters have said. Although I've been using Shimano for the longest time, I do feel that SRAM is a breath of fresh air.

Shimano
Pros:
- Shifting is very precise (assuming everything is correctly tuned)
- Braking control (modulation) is good to excellent
- Very ergonomic hoods
- Tried and tested
- Easier to set up and tune (I have plenty of experience on Shimano)
Cons:
- Single cog shifting (both on up- and down-shifts)
- Non-adjustable lever reach

SRAM
Pros:
- Shifting is very precise as well
- Multiple cog shifts on the down-shift
- Provision for reach adjustment
Cons:
- Braking is a good to excellent as well, but sometimes I find it lacking
- Small hoods, feels like I'm missing something
- More difficult to tune. Had several chain drops while tuning the FD on the stand
I don't know what Shimano group you're running, but my Ultegra 6700 brifter (2010 or 2011, 10 spd) for the rear allows for double shifts both up and down with a single sweep of either lever. Actually, now that I think about it, it may allow 3 downshifts--I don't do it that often.
 
Originally Posted by jpr95 .


I don't know what Shimano group you're running, but my Ultegra 6700 brifter (2010 or 2011, 10 spd) for the rear allows for double shifts both up and down with a single sweep of either lever. Actually, now that I think about it, it may allow 3 downshifts--I don't do it that often.
Okay, it was bugging me, so I had to go check. It only allows a single upshift at a time in the rear. However, the downshifting is up to 3--a slow, full sweep of the lever will get you two shifts, while a quick, full sweep will do 3 downshifts.
 
Originally Posted by jpr95 .


Okay, it was bugging me, so I had to go check. It only allows a single upshift at a time in the rear. However, the downshifting is up to 3--a slow, full sweep of the lever will get you two shifts, while a quick, full sweep will do 3 downshifts.
Okay, it bugged me as well so I had to go check...

I stand corrected that it Shimano shifters can downshift up to 3 cogs at a time. Thanks jpr95. However, the lever action needed for that is sooooo deep that I could only do 1 click most of the time comfortably which made me write what I wrote in my initial post.

I have a Sora (3400) on my beater, Tiagra (4400) on my rain training bike, and 105 (5700) on my primary/crit bike.

In contrast to SRAM multiple shifts are easier due to the shorter action on the inner paddles.
 
I can't really compare the two companies because I haven't fully tester both their components. I am usually biased though that thinking Japan products are better. As a normal rider I would say they are both pretty equal in quality.

I did a quick search and found this article, talks a little about both companies:
http://deviceraters.com/sram-vs-shimano/
 
I just posted a blog after researching and testing Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo's top groupsets - a dozen altogether. It gets into a lot of the comparative questions and discussion in this thread. You can read it here.

Bottom line, mechanical groupsets are a mature product and they are all pretty good for the average cycling enthusiast. You may prefer one or another for ergonomic reasons - the way the shifters feel in your hands for example - but their performance, design, and quality are pretty similar at this point. You pay more for lower weight component sets and a lot more to get electronic shifting but you'll get performance benefits from both. Do you need it? Depends on how you ride and what your goals are. Some companies provide better service support in different parts of the world than others and there are other things to consider before you decide.

If you want a deeper look at the how to pick the best groupset for you and your bike along with answers to questions like why buy a new groupset, what you should expect to spend, what are the key developments and which perform the best or are the best value, have a look a the post and let me know what you think.
 
Originally Posted by ITKCycling
I just posted a blog after researching and testing Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo's top groupsets - a dozen altogether. It gets into a lot of the comparative questions and discussion in this thread. You can read it here.

Bottom line, mechanical groupsets are a mature product and they are all pretty good for the average cycling enthusiast. You may prefer one or another for ergonomic reasons - the way the shifters feel in your hands for example - but their performance, design, and quality are pretty similar at this point. You pay more for lower weight component sets and a lot more to get electronic shifting but you'll get performance benefits from both. Do you need it? Depends on how you ride and what your goals are. Some companies provide better service support in different parts of the world than others and there are other things to consider before you decide.

If you want a deeper look at the how to pick the best groupset for you and your bike along with answers to questions like why buy a new groupset, what you should expect to spend, what are the key developments and which perform the best or are the best value, have a look a the post and let me know what you think.
Quite enjoyed your blog post, agree with your suggestion that ultegra is the best option from a value for money/performance perspective.
 
For the record i'm now a convert to SRAM. Ulterga the best value for money? no way in hell these days.
 
DailyCycle said:
I can't really compare the two companies because I haven't fully tester both their components. I am usually biased though that thinking Japan products are better. As a normal rider I would say they are both pretty equal in quality.
Similar to you Daily Cycle, I see Japanese crews coming on in there, I'm more of a fan of American products, with all other things being equal. Beyond that, the great Shimano/SRAM/Comblagno debate rages on for me.